Survey Detectability and Occupancy of Cliff Nesting Raptors (Gyrfalcon, Golden Eagle, Rough-legged Hawk, Common Raven) on the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska during May 2007.

Metadata also available as

Metadata:


Identification_Information:
Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: Booms, Travis
Publication_Date: Unpublished material
Title:
Survey Detectability and Occupancy of Cliff Nesting Raptors (Gyrfalcon, Golden Eagle, Rough-legged Hawk, Common Raven) on the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska during May 2007.
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: n/a
Online_Linkage: <http://science.nature.nps.gov/nrdata>
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: database
Description:
Abstract:
Four replicate surveys of 50-90 historical Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus), Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus), and Common Raven (Corvus corax) nests were carried out in May 2007 via helicopter in the Kilbuck Moutains and via a Husky fixed-wing plane in an area called 'the Volcanoes. Each replicate was conducted by a single, independent observer with the same helicopter or fixed-wing pilot. In order to minimize uneven detectability, pilots were not allowed to point out birds or assist the surveyor, though they were asked to fly as similar routes as possible among survey replicates. Presence or absence of birds was noted at each historical site, and each site was found using a hand-held GPS unit containing the locations of all historical nest sites. Detection histories were generated for each site and these data are to be modeled using program Presence to create a maximum likelihood estimator for detectability and occupancy for each species, used for publication and management.
Purpose:
The purpose of this dataset is to estimate survey detectability of each of the four cliff nesting species in two study areas using two different survey techniques.
Supplemental_Information:
Time Period of Content: Time Period Information: Data was collected from 5 May 2007 until 13 May 2007 Single Date/Time: Calendar Date: Currentness Reference: Current Status: Progress: ongoing analysis Maintenance and Update Frequency:
Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Range_of_Dates/Times:
Beginning_Date: 20070505
Ending_Date: 20070515
Currentness_Reference: ground condition
Status:
Progress: In work
Maintenance_and_Update_Frequency: As needed
Spatial_Domain:
Bounding_Coordinates:
West_Bounding_Coordinate: -166.00000
East_Bounding_Coordinate: -160.00000
North_Bounding_Coordinate: 62.00000
South_Bounding_Coordinate: 60.00000
Description_of_Geographic_Extent:
Description of Geographic Extent: Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge; Kilbuck Mountains and Ingakslugwat Hills
Keywords:
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Theme_Keyword: Occupancy
Theme_Keyword: Aerial Survey
Theme_Keyword: Raptors
Theme_Keyword: Gyrfalcon
Theme_Keyword: Golden Eagle
Theme_Keyword: Rough-legged Hawk
Theme_Keyword: Common Raven
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: National Park Service Theme Category Thesaurus
Theme_Keyword: Occupancy
Theme_Keyword: Aerial Survey
Theme_Keyword: Raptors
Theme_Keyword: Gyrfalcon
Theme_Keyword: Golden Eagle
Theme_Keyword: Rough-legged Hawk
Theme_Keyword: Common Raven
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: ISO 19115 Topic Category
Theme_Keyword: Common Raven
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Place_Keyword: Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge
Place_Keyword: Alaska
Place_Keyword: Kilbuck Mountains
Place_Keyword: Ingakslugwat Hills
Place_Keyword: Mud Volcanoes
Place_Keyword: North America
Place_Keyword: USA
Place_Keyword: Arctic
Place_Keyword: Sub-arctic
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: National Park System Unit Name Thesaurus
Place_Keyword: Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge
Place_Keyword: Alaska
Place_Keyword: Kilbuck Mountains
Place_Keyword: Ingakslugwat Hills
Place_Keyword: Mud Volcanoes
Place_Keyword: North America
Place_Keyword: USA
Place_Keyword: Arctic
Place_Keyword: Sub-arctic
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: National Park System Unit Code Thesaurus
Place_Keyword: Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge
Place_Keyword: Alaska
Place_Keyword: Kilbuck Mountains
Place_Keyword: Ingakslugwat Hills
Place_Keyword: Mud Volcanoes
Place_Keyword: North America
Place_Keyword: USA
Place_Keyword: Arctic
Place_Keyword: Sub-arctic
Temporal:
Temporal_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Temporal_Keyword: 2007
Access_Constraints: Data not publicly available until results published.
Use_Constraints: Open to collaboration; see PI
Point_of_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Travis Booms
Contact_Organization: University of Alaska Fairbanks
Contact_Position: Student
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical
Address: UAF Biology and Wildlife Dept
Address: 211 Irving I
City: Fairbanks
State_or_Province: AK
Postal_Code: 99775
Country: USA
Contact_TDD/TTY_Telephone: 907-474-6232
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 907-474-5712
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: fttlb@uaf.edu
Taxonomy:
Keywords/Taxon:
Taxonomic_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Taxonomic_Keywords: Falco rusticolus
Taxonomic_Keywords: Gyrfalcon
Keywords/Taxon:
Taxonomic_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Taxonomic_Keywords: Aquila chrysaetos Golden Eagle
Keywords/Taxon:
Taxonomic_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Taxonomic_Keywords: Buteo lagopus Rough-legged Hawk
Keywords/Taxon:
Taxonomic_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Taxonomic_Keywords: Corvus corax Common Raven
Taxonomic_System:
Classification_System/Authority:
Classification_System_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: Unknown
Publication_Date: Unknown
Title: American Ornithologists Union Bird Checklist
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form:
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Kingdom
Taxon_Rank_Value: Animalia
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Phylum
Taxon_Rank_Value: Chordata
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Subphylum
Taxon_Rank_Value: Vertebrata
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Class
Taxon_Rank_Value: Aves
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Order
Taxon_Rank_Value: Falconiformes
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Family
Taxon_Rank_Value: Accipitridae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Subfamily
Taxon_Rank_Value: Accipitrinae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Aquila
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Species
Taxon_Rank_Value: Aquila chrysaetos
Applicable_Common_Name: aigle royal
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Buteo
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Species
Taxon_Rank_Value: Buteo lagopus
Applicable_Common_Name: Roughleg
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Family
Taxon_Rank_Value: Falconidae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Falco
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Species
Taxon_Rank_Value: Falco rusticolus
Applicable_Common_Name: faucon gerfaut
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Order
Taxon_Rank_Value: Passeriformes
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Family
Taxon_Rank_Value: Corvidae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Corvus
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Species
Taxon_Rank_Value: Corvus corax
Applicable_Common_Name: Northern Raven
Data_Set_Credit:
Funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Migratory Birds.
Native_Data_Set_Environment: Field Note Books, Excel
Analytical_Tool:
Analytical_Tool_Description: Presence Software, 2.0 (to be completed)

Data_Quality_Information:
Attribute_Accuracy:
Attribute_Accuracy_Report: Data are accurate in space and time; triple-checked.
Logical_Consistency_Report: All data collected under same protocol
Completeness_Report: Complete
Positional_Accuracy:
Horizontal_Positional_Accuracy:
Horizontal_Positional_Accuracy_Report:
n/a, GPS was used, but locations not included or needed in data set.
Lineage:
Methodology:
Methodology_Type: Survey Protocols
Methodology_Description:
Gyrfalcon Helicopter Replicate Survey Protocol, May 2007 (DRAFT) Travis Booms

Observers Goal: To detect one or more Gyrfalcons at historical or potential nest sites and record additional information (eggs, pair, breeding activity) when available. We are interested in RLHA, GOEA, and CORA sightings as well and these need to be documented, but Gyrfalcons take priority.

Definitions: Point- A GPS waypoint or spot on a map representing a historical Gyrfalcon nest site. This is our sampling unit. Zone- A cluster of 2 or more points that are too close together or on the same physical structure such that a perched or soaring bird above it cannot be assigned to only one of the points. A zone should be treated as a single point. A zone is indicated on the data sheet as a block of point numbers and on the map by a series of point numbers (123-126). Pass- A flight path across, over, or around a point.

Instructions to Pilot: 1) Pilot cannot assist observer in detecting birds in any way. Pilot cannot point out birds, nests, cliffs, trees, etc. If a pilot accidentally provides information about a bird to the observer, observer should record what was said or done. 2) Pilot should not let knowledge of bird locations gained from previous replicates affect how he or she flies. Consistent flight paths among replicates are highly desirable. 3) Ask pilot to try to remember the number of birds that he or she saw but that the observer likely missed. 4) Flying is up to the pilot obviously, but it should be kept as consistent as possible among replicates. This is best done if the pilot follows the GPS track from the first replicate. On the first replicate, the pilot should have a route of the waypoints to be surveyed downloaded into his or her GPS. 5) Request that the pilot approaches waypoints slowly, to give observer time to scan nesting habitat.

Instructions to Observer: Navigating: Observer should navigate by map and/or GPS. All observers must have at least one GPS on at all times to record the track of their flight. GPS should be set to record a position every 15 seconds. Observers should use the Goto and nearest point options in the GPS to navigate to points. Observer should talk the pilot into each point. Give pilot the distance to site, bearing and/or direction of next point using the numbers of a clock relative to the aircraft (12 meaning straight ahead, 6 meaning straight behind, etc.). Update the pilot regularly as point approaches. The observer needs to recommend the flight path as much as possible within safe flying conditions.

Communications: Observer should call out everything that he or she sees to help the pilot determine if the observer may have missed a bird or nest. This also helps the pilot navigate the helicopter to provide the observer the best view of the habitat.

General Approach to Looking at Habitat: When approaching a point, the observer should be scanning across all likely nesting habitat to try to detect a flying or perched bird. Do not immediately focus on likely nest spots. After scanning the area, the observer may then begin focusing on likely or known nest ledges.

Flight Paths: On the first pass, the observer should guide the helicopter to the GPS location of the point. This should standardize the first pass among observers as best as reasonably possible because all observers will arrive at approximately the same location to view habitat. Height of this pass should be eye level with or slightly above the structure that likely contains the historical nest site. We expect there will be three types of structures that require three different types of FIRST PASSES:

1) Small Cliff Face or Tree Observer should guide helicopter to the GPS point while looking for birds/nest. 2) Spire or Knife Edge Observer should to the point and circle around structure looking or birds or nests. 3) Complex Ridge or Very Large Cliff Observer should begin surveying the cliff on one end and parallel the structure until the GPS point is located. The pass should continue past the GPS point until the opposite end of the cliff is reached. If nesting habitat exists on both sides of a ridge, both sides of the ridge should be surveyed in this fashion.

Direction of approach will be dictated largely by direction of the previous point surveyed and wind. This should remain consistent. There are no restrictions on the flight path of the second and third passes. Generally speaking, observers should work cliffs beginning at the top of one end and working down and across the face using multiple passes as necessary until he or she feels they have covered all available nesting habitat. No more than 3 passes should be conducted per site. However, the observer on the last replicate may make more than 3 passes to further investigate the breeding status of birds observed.

Information to record: Information on GYRF, RLHA, GOEA, and CORA. In data columns: 1) Cliff Side: Circle the pass number on which the observer was on the cliff side of the helicopter. Put a slash through the pass number on which the helicopter pilot was on the cliff side (and therefore reducing observers visibility of the cliff). This should be recorded at every point, regardless of detecting a bird. 2) Pass Detected on: Circle the pass (1, 2 or 3) on which a bird was detected. If a second species is detected, record on which pass the additional species was detected in the notes section. 3) Distance Bird Detected: Circle the appropriate distance category that includes the straight line distance between the aircraft and the bird when first detected. If a second species is detected at a point, record the information for it in the notes section. 4) Number of Passes: Record the total number of passes made per point.

In notes section, record: 1) Species. 2) Bird Behavior: perched, flying, incubating, or flushed by helicopter. 3) Exactly what you see: empty nest (EN), no nest (NN), no birds (NB), no nesting habitat (NNH), etc. The abbreviations above are encouraged. Presence or absence of a stick nest should always be noted! 4) Number of eggs, condition of nests, etc. should also be recorded if possible.

NEVER leave a notes section blank; write down what you see. Fill-in data fields at the top of the data form and comments section on the bottom after the flight. Ask the pilot for approximate wind speed and direction, total flight hours, amount of fuel used, etc.

Survey Rules at Each Point; IF: -A Gyrfalcon is observed survey at that point is ended and observer immediately travels to next point or zone. This will reduce disturbance and hopefully minimize any effects multiple surveys may have on birds responses to the helicopter. However, the observer on the fourth replicate should continue the survey until evidence of nesting is observed or observer feels confident the bird is not nesting. -A RLHA, CORA, or non-incubating GOEA is observed survey at point or zone continues with up to three passes. -Incubating GOEA is observed - passes may continue near the point but NOT within 200 m (horizontal distance) of the eagle nest.

To Do After the Survey: 1) Interview Pilot to help fill-in data fields at top of data form. 2) All observers should transcribe information on the data form into a digital copy of the form as soon as possible. Doing this shortly after the flight is desired before the memory of the survey fades. At a minimum, the observer should review his or her notes the same day of the survey to attempt to fill-in any omissions or correct mistakes while the memory of the survey is fresh.

Gear List: -GPS(s) -Extra batteries -Map(s) -Data Form -Clip board -3 pens/pencils -10X binoculars -Flight suit and helmet -Ziploc bag(s) for air sickness -food (eat while traveling between distant points, not while surveying if possible) -water -air sickness pills (taken before flight) -wrench and/or bung wrench for fuel cache

Gyrfalcon Fixed-wing Replicate Survey Protocol, May 2007 (DRAFT) Travis Booms

Observers Goal: To detect one or more Gyrfalcon(s) at historical or potential nest sites and record additional information (eggs, pair, nest present) when available. We are interested in RLHA, GOEA, and CORA sightings as well and these need to be documented, but Gyrfalcons take priority.

Definitions: Point- A GPS waypoint or spot on a map representing a historical or potential Gyrfalcon nest site. Zone- A cluster of 2 or more points that are close enough together or on the same physical structure such that a perched or soaring bird seen above them cannot be assigned to only one of the points. A zone should be treated as a single point in survey methodology and can only have 3 passes flown over it. A zone is indicated on the data sheet as a block of point numbers and on the map by a series of point numbers (123-126). Pass- A flight path over or in front of a point or zone. The first pass for each point should always be a straight line over and slightly to the side of the point and as similar as possible in all replicates. Subsequent pass are not restricted to any particular path.

Instructions to Pilot: 1) Pilot cannot assist observer in detecting birds in any way. Pilot cannot point out birds, nests, cliffs, trees, etc. If a pilot accidentally provides information about a bird to the observer, observer should record what was said or done. 2) Pilot should not let knowledge of bird locations gained from previous replicates affect how he or she flies. Consistent flight paths among replicates are highly desirable. 3) Ask pilot to try to remember the number of birds that flush in front of the approaching plane and that were likely missed by the observer. 4) Flying is up to the pilot obviously, but as is possible, the following should be kept consistent among replicates: a. Aircraft: Super Cub or Husky. b. Survey speed: 60-70 mph. c. Height above nest/cliff/tree: 50-100 ft. d. Horizontal distance from nest/cliff/tree: 25-75 ft. e. Speed, height, etc. when traveling BETWEEN points can vary. 4) Pilot should be encouraged to allow observer to download waypoints and a GPS track from a previous replicate into the aircrafts GPS. This will assist the pilot with navigating and attempting to follow the same flight path in all replicates.

Instructions to Observer: Navigating: Observer may navigate by map and/or GPS. All observers must have at least one GPS on at all times to record the track of their flight. GPS should be set to record a position every 15 seconds. Observers should use the Goto and nearest point options in the GPS to navigate to points. All observers must follow the same route and order of points, which must be established and incorporated into the data form before the first replicate. Observer should talk the pilot into each point. Give pilot the distance to site, bearing and/or direction of next point using the numbers of a clock relative to the aircraft (12 means straight ahead, 2 means quartering to the right, 6 means straight behind, etc.). Update the pilot regularly as point approaches. The observer needs to recommend the flight path as much as possible within safe flying conditions!

Flight Paths: All points should first be over-flown in a straight line, ideally 50-100 ft. above the structure and 25-75 ft. to one side. The first pass should be as consistent as possible between replicates and should not be a circling flight over the structure. Direction of approach will be dictated largely by direction of previous points surveyed and wind. If the point is located within a long, linear stretch of potential nesting habitat (long cliff, lava flow, or linear stand of trees), the first pass should parallel the linear nesting habitat. Subsequent pass are not restricted to any particular path (may be curving or circular), though flight speed and elevation should remain similar during all passes.

Fixed-wing surveys are rapid fire. If an observer needs more time to take notes, operate a GPS, or otherwise orient themselves, he or she may (and should) instruct the pilot to circle over an area away from any points while the observer catches-up with notes or navigating. This should only happen when traveling BETWEEN points and NOT between survey passes at a point.

Number of Passes Per Point or Zone: To reduce disturbance of birds and hence, the chance of affecting bird behavior during subsequent replicates, no more than three passes shall be flown over a point or zone. However, the observer conducting the last replicate may fly as many passes over a point or zone as they see fit to confirm presence or breeding activity. Passes should be conducted at each point until: A) A Gyrfalcon is observed The survey at that point is ended and observer immediately travels to next point or zone. This does not apply to the last replicate. B) Incubating GOEA is observed - passes should continue near the point but NOT within 200 m (horizontal distance) of the eagle nest. C) Two passes are completed and observer has had good views of the nesting habitat and is confident no bird is present. This primarily applies to very small, simple patches of habitat such as small isolated boulders and small clumps of trees. D) Three passes are completed.

Data to record: Information on GYRF, RLHA, GOEA, and CORA. In data columns: 1) Circle the pass (1, 2 or 3) on which a Gyrfalcon was detected. Only use this column for GYRF. 2) Write down the number of passes completed at each point. 3) Circle the appropriate distance category that includes the straight line distance between the aircraft and the GYRF. In notes section: 1) Species 2) Bird Behavior: perched, flying, incubating, or flushed by plane. 3) Exactly what you see: empty nest (EN), no nest (NN), no birds (NB), no nesting habitat (NNH), etc. The abbreviations above are encouraged. Noting presence/absence of a stick nest is particularly important as this may allow us to model detectability of stick nests, which is desirable. 4) Number of eggs, condition of nests, etc. 5) If RLHA, GOEA, or CORA, record the pass on which the bird was detected and distance, as possible, in notes section. However, only use pass and distance columns to record GYRF sightings.

NEVER leave a notes section blank; write down what you see. Circle the pass during which a Gyrfalcon was detected. Record total number of passes flown at each point. Circle the straight-line distance (meters) between the aircraft and the bird when first detected.

Fill-in data fields at the top of the data form and comments section on the bottom after the flight. Ask the pilot for survey speed, average survey height, wind speed, and wind direction.

To Do After the Survey: 1) Interview Pilot to help fill-in data fields at top of data form. 2) All observers should transcribe information on the data form into a digital copy of the form the same day. Doing this shortly after the flight is HIGHLY desired before the memory of the survey fades!

Gear List: -GPS(s) -Extra batteries -Map(s) -Data Form -Clip board -3 pens/pencils -10X binoculars -Flight suit and helmet -Ziploc bag(s) for air sickness -food (eat while traveling between distant points if possible, not while surveying. Alternatively, the pilot should circle away from points while observer eats) -water -air sickness pills (taken before flight) -wrench and or bung wrench for fuel cache -LUCK!

Methodology_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: Travis Booms
Originator: Phil Schempf
Originator: Mark Fuller
Originator: Brian McCaffery
Publication_Date: Unpublished material
Title:
Replicate Survey Protocols for Surveying Cliff-Nesting Raptors on the Yukon Delta NWR, Alaska, to Estimate Occupancy and Survey Detectability May 2007.
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form:
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Data are worked-up from field notes (data now in Excel), are being analyzed with Presence Software 2.0, and results will be published by 2009. Data are organized in 2 Excel Worksheets: 2007 Kilbucks, 2007 Volcanoes.
Process_Date: Not complete

Spatial_Data_Organization_Information:
Indirect_Spatial_Reference:
Kilbuck Mountains, Ingakslugwat Hills, Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge

Entity_and_Attribute_Information:
Detailed_Description:
Entity_Type:
Entity_Type_Label: 2007 Kilbucks Detection Histories
Entity_Type_Definition: Database containing survey results
Entity_Type_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Site
Attribute_Definition:
one historical nesting site surveyed during each replicate survey.
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 4 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=Detected 0=Not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 1 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=specied detected 0=not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 2 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=Detected 0=Not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 3 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=Detected 0=Not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Detailed_Description:
Entity_Type:
Entity_Type_Label: 2007 Volcano Detection Histories
Entity_Type_Definition: Detection histories of birds observed in the Volcanoes Surveys
Entity_Type_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Site
Attribute_Definition:
one historical nesting site surveyed during each replicate survey.
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 1 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=specied detected 0=not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 2 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=Detected 0=Not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 3 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=Detected 0=Not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Observer 4 Detections
Attribute_Definition:
1=Detected 0=Not detected
Attribute_Definition_Source: PI
Overview_Description:
Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
Data set includes Columns: Nest Site (numbered historical nest sites), Species(species detected at that historical nest site), Detected (1=yes, 0=no).
Entity_and_Attribute_Detail_Citation: Travis Booms

Distribution_Information:
Distributor:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Travis Booms
Contact_Organization: University of Alaska Fairbanks
Contact_Position: PhD student
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical
Address: UAF Biology and Wildlife Dept.
Address: 211 Irving I
City: Fairbanks
State_or_Province: AK
Postal_Code: 99775
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 907-474-6232
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 907-474-5712
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: fttlb@uaf.edu
Distribution_Liability: see PI
Standard_Order_Process:
Fees: None

Metadata_Reference_Information:
Metadata_Date: 20071112
Metadata_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Travis Booms, Falk Huettmann
Contact_Organization: University of Alaska Fairbanks
Contact_Position: PhD student/Advisor
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical
Address: EWHALE Lab
Address: Biology and Wildlife Dept., Institute of Arctic Biology
Address: 211 Irving I
City: Fairbanks
State_or_Province: AK
Postal_Code: 99775
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 907-474-6232
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 907-474-6967
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: fffh@uaf.edu
Metadata_Standard_Name:
FGDC Biological Data Profile of the Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata
Metadata_Standard_Version: FGDC-STD-001.1-1999
Metadata_Extensions:
Online_Linkage: <http://nrdata.nps.gov/profiles/NPS_Profile.xml>
Profile_Name: NPS NR and GIS Metadata Profile
Metadata_Access_Constraints: None
Metadata_Use_Constraints: None
Metadata_Security_Information:
Metadata_Security_Classification_System: None
Metadata_Security_Classification: Unclassified
Metadata_Security_Handling_Description: None

Generated by mp version 2.8.25 on Tue Nov 13 12:06:59 2007