• Why did Alaska eliminate the Alaska Coastal Management Program?

      Wilson, Ryan M.; Todd, Susan; O'Donoghue, Brian P.; Speight, Jeremy S. (2018-05)
      In 1972, the federal government passed the Coastal Zone Management Act. The federal government recognized that there is a national interest in effective management of the nation's coasts. The act created a program that made it possible for states to collaborate with the federal government to manage the nation's coastal areas and resources. In July of 2011, after thirty-two years of active participation in the program, Alaska became the only eligible state or territory to choose to no longer take part in the program. This action significantly affected Alaska's ability to manage the state's coastline and resources. This research is a qualitative case study that documents the events leading up to the establishment of the Alaska Coastal Management Program, its implementation, its elimination, and the initiative regarding its possible reinstatement. The research evaluates the current form of Alaska's coastal management practices to determine if it meets Elinor Ostrom's design principles for effective common property resource management, as well as theories on decentralization/devolution, polycentric governance, and adaptability and resilience. The research concludes that Alaska's choice to eliminate the Alaska Coastal Management Program was influenced by the interests of natural resource extraction agencies and a consequence of divisive party politics. The research finds that the effect of eliminating the Alaska Coastal Management Program was that the State of Alaska took a significant step away from what science recommends as prudent ways to manage common property resources.
    • Why Do We Farm in Alaska?

      Greene, Barbara E. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992-05)
    • Wildflower Seed Mixes for Interior Alaska

      Rutledge, Ouina C.; Holloway, Patricia S. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1994-02)
      The objectives of this research were to characterize six native and non-native wildflower seed mixes sold in Alaska in terms of seed germination, flowering dates, winter survival, and public acceptability. In addition, the growth of wildflower seed mixes was evaluated in relation to two management practices: irrigation and seasonal sowing date.
    • Wildland Fire in Alaska: A History of Organized Fire Suppression and Management in the Last Frontier

      Todd, Susan K.; Jewkes, Holly Ann (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2006-03)
      When the federal government used the military to fight fires in Yellowstone National Park in 1886, it marked the beginning of wildland fire suppression in the United States (Pyne 1982). Organized fire suppression in the Territory of Alaska began almost 60 years after the emergence of this first federal effort in the contiguous states. The state's first fire control agency, the Alaska Fire Control Service, was established in 1939. It Faced a vast, remote, and largely unknown territory where wildfires burned millions of acres every year.
    • Winter Survival of Grasses and Legumes in Subarctic Alaska as Related to Latitudinal Adaptation, Pre-Winter Storage of Food Reserves, and Dry-Matter Concentration in Overwintering Tissues

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1993-09)
      similar experiments, were to (a) compare winter hardiness in subarctic Alaska of numerous plant species and ecotypes from various latitudinal sources within most species, and (b) seek a better understanding of certain aspects of pre-winter physiologic changes in plants that are associated with successful or with unsuccessful winter survival in this northern area. Both experiments were conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6°N) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska.
    • Winterhardiness and Agronomic Performance of Wildryes (Elymus species) Compared With Other Grasses in Alaska, and Responses of Siberian Wildrye to Management Practices

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1993-12)
      This report summarizes eight field experiments involving both native and introduced wildrye grasses (Elymus species) conducted over a span of several years at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6oN) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska. Objectives were to (a) evaluate winterhardiness, persistence, forage yield, and other aspects of agronomic performance of numerous strains within several species of wildrye, (b) assess their potential for forage use or conservation plantings in Alaska, and (c) determine the effects on Siberian wildrye (E. sibiricus) of seeding-year management options (time of planting and time of harvest) on seeding-year forage production, subsequent winter survival, and on second-year forage production.
    • Winterhardiness, Forage Production, and Persistence of Introduced and Native Grasses and Legumes in Southcentral Alaska

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1994-08)
      This study consisted of four separate field experiments, each of six years duration, conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6oN) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska. Objectives were to compare winterhardiness, forage productivity, and general persistence of introduced grass and legume species, strains, and cultivars from various world sources with Alaska-developed cultivars and native Alaskan species. Twenty-one species of grasses compared (Tables 1 through 4) included eight native to Alaska, four Alaska cultivars, and numerous introduced cultivars and regional strains (one to seven per species) from North America and northern Europe. Legumes included two species of biennial sweetclover and nine species of perennials, six introduced and three native. Each experiment was harvested once near the end of the seeding year and twice annually for five years thereafter.
    • WINTERING BREEDING EWES IN ALASKA

      Ebert, W.J. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1945-11)
      Forage production for wintering livestock in Alaska has long been a problem where cleared land is limited. In the vicinity of the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet there are tide flats where native grasses grow in such abundance that they are utilized for hay. To determine the relative feeding value of this tide flat hay as compared with other locally-grown roughages for wintering pregnant ewes, the Matanuska Experiment Station carried out a series of five one-year feeding trials. The tests were conducted for an xverage of 151 days’ feeding period each year, using the bred ewes of the Station flock of pure-bred Hampshires. Results were based on the condition of the ewes at the contusion of each year’s trial, on the size and vigor of the lambs, on ihe weight and quality of the fleece and on the cost of the respective rations over the five-year period.
    • Woody Biomass Fuel Crops in Interior Alaska

      Garber-Slaght, Robbin; Sparrow, Stephen D.; masiak, darleen t.; Holdmann, Gwen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009)
      As the price of traditional fossil fuels escalates, there is increasing interest in using renewable resources, such as biomass, to meet our energy needs. Biomass resources are of particular interest to communities in interior Alaska, where they are abundant (Fresco, 2006). Biomass has the potential to partially replace heating oil, in addition to being a possible source for electric power generation (Crimp and Adamian, 2000; Nicholls and Crimp, 2002; Fresco, 2006). The communities of Tanana and Dot Lake have already installed small Garn boilers to provide space heating for homes and businesses (Alaska Energy Authority, 2009). A village-sized combined heat and power (CHP) demonstration project has been proposed in North Pole. In addition, several Fairbanks area organizations are interested in using biomass as a fuel source. For example, the Fairbanks North Star Borough is interested in using biomass to supplement coal in a proposed coal-to-liquids project, the Cold Climate Housing Research Center is planning to test a small biomass fired CHP unit, and the University of Alaska is planning an upgrade to its existing coal-fired power plant that could permit co-firing with biomass fuels. The challenge for all of these projects is in ensuring that biomass can be harvested on both an economically and ecologically sustainable basis.
    • Working for Alaskans 2009 - a wealth of opportunity

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009
    • Working for Alaskans: a wealth of knowledge

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004
      2004 Strategic Plan of the School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (SNRAS) and Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) by Carol E. Lewis.
    • Working for Alaskans: a wealth of knowledge

      School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2003
      This publication highlights some of the research, instruction, and outreach programs of the School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (SNRAS). If you are acquainted with us, you will notice our name change and the recent addition of the geography department. Our research arm remains the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station to assure you of continued research and outreach programs that include traditional agricultural production and forest management.
    • Yield and Quality of Timothy in Southcentral Alaska

      Mitchell, William W. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1989-10)
      Timothy (Phleum pratense) is the major perennial forage seeded on strongly acidic soils in southcentral Alaska. It is an important forage grass on the Kenai Peninsula and in the Susitna Valley. Bromegrass (Bromus inermis) is more commonly used on the moderately acidic soils of the Matanuska valley. Timothy is also used to some extent in the Tanana Valley of interior Alaska. Recently it has assumed an increasingly important role in forage programs of dairy farms and hay growers in the Pt. MacKenzie Agricultural Project northwest of Anchorage.