• Aboriginal Rights in Alaska

      Conn, Stephen (VWGO-Verlag, 1987-12)
      This paper describes the current state of aboriginal rights in Alaska and the impact of federal and state laws and policies on Alaska Native political and legal rights, tribal status, self-determination, and access to tribal lands. Topics covered include the legal determination of Alaska Native identity, the legal status of Alaska Native groups, Alaska Native land rights, sovereignty and self-government, subsistence, recognition of family and kinship structures, the criminal justice system in rural Alaska, customary versus formal legal process, and human rights and equality before the law.
    • The Aborigine in Comparative Law: Subnational Report on Alaska Natives

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-08)
      This paper describes the current state of aboriginal rights in Alaska and the impact of federal and state laws and policies on Alaska Native political and legal rights, tribal status, self-determination, and access to tribal lands. Topics covered include the legal determination of Alaska Native identity, the legal status of Alaska Native groups, Alaska Native land rights, sovereignty and self-government, subsistence, recognition of family and kinship structures, the criminal justice system in rural Alaska, customary versus formal legal process, and human rights and equality before the law.
    • About the Authors

      ANSC (2015-08-20)
    • Academy Expands Medical Forensic Care and Response

      Casto, L. Diane; Trujillo, Angelia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      The Alaska Comprehensive Forensic Training Academy, the first of its kind in the nation, trains nurses and health care providers to support victims of interpersonal violence in a trauma-informed manner and to preserve potential evidence and information for future prosecutions.
    • Accessing Permanent Fund Earnings to Reduce the Fiscal Gap

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-02-04)
    • Accessing Permanent Fund Earnings to Reduce the Fiscal Gap

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/1/2016)
      Presented to Alaska Senate State Affairs Committee on February 4, 2016
    • ACES High or Low? The Impact of a Severance Tax Change on Alaskan Oil Activity

      Tanaka, Audrey; Reimer, Matthew; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-01)
    • ACES vs MAPA (SB21): Revenues and Jobs

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-06-25)
    • ACES vs MAPA (SB21): Revenues and Jobs

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/2014)
    • ACI Technical Report: Initial Measures Derived from Census

      Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-06-09)
      The decennial census provides a wealth of information about communities that has been mined by social scientist for decades. The purpose of this technical report is to describe an initial set of measures taken from or derived from the 2000 U.S. Census in an effort to develop a statistical description of Anchorage communities for use with the Anchorage Community Indicators project of the University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center. The initial set of measures isolated from census are inspired by two principal bodies of work: (1) the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, an exceptionally well endowed research effort that took neighborhood measurement very seriously; and, (2) Peter Blau’s work that specifies parameter of social structure, heterogeneity, and inequality. The focus of the paper is on documenting how the measures were formed from 2000 Summary File 3 census tables. However, measures without conceptual content are of little value. Accordingly, the paper will offer a brief introduction to the derivative works (PHDCN, Blau) and then follow with a fairly detailed presentation of each measure (what concept is addressed, how it is measured, how the measure is distributed across block group and census tracts, and isolation of the census tables providing essential counts).
    • "Activating" Park Spaces in Anchorage’s Town Square Park (Research Note)

      Payne, Troy C.; Reinhard, Daniel (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-06)
      This brief research note describes an intervention designed to increase activity in Anchorage's Town Square Park in an effort to reduce public disorder in the park. An abbreviated evaluation of the intervention is included.
    • Acute Kidney Injury: Continuous Quality Improvement for Systems Change

      Bassett, Robin (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is reduced kidney function over hours to days which can be reversible but can lead to renal failure and death. AKI is diagnosed using serum creatinine and urine output but these factors are not sensitive or specific, and no biomarker has been found for more accurate diagnosis. International guidelines for AKI diagnosis and treatment were released in 2012 by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group. Many providers are not aware of AKI and guidelines for treatment have not been implemented in practice. The purpose of this continuous quality improvement (CQI) project was to improve healthcare team member knowledge of AKI Guidelines and to develop electronic health records (EHR) tools to improve AKI recognition and diagnosis. EHR tools were developed for implementation during a two-month CQI practice initiative. An Excel spreadsheet for AKI diagnosis and EHR renal protection protocols were created and tested. Updates were made to the tools to allow ease of use based on interprofessional feedback. A trifold AKI educational pamphlet was developed following implementation to fill gaps in knowledge. The interprofessional critical care team survey reported the tools were helpful in facilitating AKI recognition and management according to published guidelines. More work is needed to find sustainable and significant improvements in AKI recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. AKI guidelines should be disseminated to non- nephrology professionals after revision to allow for increased diagnosis and management of this critical and common problem.
    • ADAM-Anchorage Data: Are They Representative?

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03)
      This paper presents the results of a study designed to assess the representativeness of realized samples of recent arrestees selected for the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program in Anchorage, Alaska. Because one of the most important goals of the ADAM program is to produce scientific information on the prevalence of alcohol and drug use behaviors among arrestees that is generalizable to an entire local arrestee population, establishing the representativeness of realized samples (or isolating inherent biases) is an essential first step to meaningful use of these data to address locally defined problems. In order to determine the reasonableness of inferences grounded in realized samples of ADAM respondents, an analysis was done comparing various characteristics between each stage of the sample selection process including the census of eligible arrestee population, the designed ADAM arrestee sample, arrestees available for interview, arrestees actually interviewed (“realized” sample), and arrestees that provided urine sample (“realized” sample). If the realized samples are similar to the census we can have a greater degree of confidence in our capacity to describe the population of Anchorage arrestees using ADAM data. Also, if it happens that departures are detected between realized samples and the arrestee census we are better positioned to condition the inferences made by integrating these discerned biases into our conclusions.
    • Adaptation to climate change in coastal communities: findings from seven sites on four continents

      Berman, Matthew; Kofinas, Gary (Climatic Change, 2019-10-26)
      Climate change is causing wide-ranging effects on ecosystem services critical to coastal communities and livelihoods, creating an urgent need to adapt. Most studies of climate change adaptation consist of narrative descriptions of individual cases or global synthesis, making it difficult to formulate and test locally rooted but generalizable hypotheses about adaptation processes. In contrast, researchers in this study analyzed key points in climate change adaptation derived from coordinated fieldwork in seven coastal communities around the world, including Arctic, temperate, and tropical areas on four continents. Study communities faced multiple challenges from sea level rise and warmer ocean temperatures, including coastal erosion, increasing salinity, and ecological changes. We analyzed how the communities adapted to climate effects and other co-occurring forces for change, focusing on most important changes to local livelihoods and societies, and barriers to and enablers of adaptation. Although many factors contributed to adaptation, communities with strong self-organized local institutions appeared better able to adapt without substantial loss of well-being than communities where these institutions were weak or absent. Key features of these institutions included setting and enforcing rules locally and communication across scales. Self-governing local institutions have been associated with sustainable management of natural resources. In our study communities, analogous institutions played a similar role to moderate adverse effects from climate-driven environmental change. The findings suggest that policies to strengthen, recognize, and accommodate local institutions could improve adaptation outcomes.
    • Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities

      Schmidt, Jennifer; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-19)
      Our surroundings and society are both constantly evolving. Some changes are due to natural processes. People are responsible for other changes, because of what we do—for example, increasing the size of the population, expanding technology, and increasing mobility and connectivity. And some changes—like climate change—are due to a combination of natural processes and actions of people. In the Arctic, including the Aleutian Islands, marine and coastal ecosystems have seen the largest number of regime shifts with direct and indirect consequences for subsistence activities, commercial fisheries, and coastal communities (Council 2016). This paper describes current subsistence activities and changes local residents have observed over time in three Aleutian Island communities—Akutan, Nikolski, and Atka. As described more later, we did initial household surveys in 2016 and a second round in 2017, as well as more detailed interviews with some residents.
    • Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities

      Schmidt, Jennifer; Berman, Matt (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 4/19/2018)
    • Adult Violent and Property Crime Arrests in Alaska, 2002-2010

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
      This research overview presents data on adult arrests and arrest rates for serious violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
    • Adverse Childhood Experiences and Their Association with Alcohol Abuse by Alaska Adults

      Rivera, Marny; Sidmore, Patrick (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      This article examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) — such as abuse and household dysfunction in childhood — and its association with adoption by Alaska adults of the health-risk behaviors of heavy and binge drinking. The behavioral health of Alaskans could be improved by addressing the association between ACEs and health-risk drinking behaviors, and establishing an integrated prevention system.
    • The African: Debunking the Stereotypes

      Abam, Ruddy (University of Alaska Anchorage Student Life and Leadership: Student Showcase, 2013-04-30)
      These visuals represent the video: THE AFRICAN: Debunking the Stereotype, by Ruddy Abam, that explore the labels and definitions given to african men and women, mainly by the western world and western cultures. As the video rolls, it narrates the various stereotypes that the African deals with, accompanied by Macklemore’s Same Love: (partial Instrumental) in the background and a descriptive overvoice by the author Ruddy Abam.
    • After Broadband: A Study of Organizational Use of Broadband in Southwest Alaska

      Hudson, Heather E.; Sharp, Suzanne; Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-01)
      The purpose of this research was to gain a preliminary understanding of how organizations including large and small businesses, Native corporations and organizations, and local and regional governments are using broadband that is now available in much of southwest Alaska. To learn about community access to broadband, interviews were also conducted with library and school staff in communities where broadband had been installed under the OWL (Online with Libraries) program. Further, the study identifies research from other sources that could help to predict what socio-economic impacts the availability and adoption of broadband may have in rural Alaska. Financial institutions use online connections for teller services and credit and debit card processing, and stated that more people in rural communities now have debit cards that they can use for online purchases and bill paying. Large retailers use online services for payroll, for pointof-sale (POS) transactions, and online ordering. Seafood processors rely heavily on connectivity with their head offices (generally in the lower 48) for administrative services including payroll, accounting, shipping and receiving, purchasing, and ERP (enterprise resource planning), and access data base software to track fish tickets. Seafood processors also provide Internet access for their employees, most of whom are seasonal and from other states or countries. Tourism businesses use broadband for online reservation systems and for guests, who increasingly demand connectivity even for remote vacations. Village corporations and tribal councils use online services to help their residents obtain hunting and fishing licenses and fishing permits, to learn about funding opportunities, and to file reports on grants. Local Governments connect online for interoffice communications and for payroll and other administrative functions. Other online applications and services include providing remote desktop access from other agency sites, use of online tools for land management and mapping, training including webinars for workforce development, and providing access to social services for clients. An economic development organization sends newsletters to communities electronically and packets of documents to its board members rather than relying on fax or courier. Websites are important for tourism-related businesses to advertise and promote their businesses and for nonprofits and local governments to provide information about their services. 5 Broadband now plays many roles in rural education. Most students are required to use the Internet for class assignments. High school students can connect to classes in advanced subjects in other communities, and may complete online courses for college credit. Libraries remain important locations for community access, with residents going online to connect with friends on Facebook, as well as to download content for e-books, file income tax, and apply for jobs and government benefits. School and library Wi-Fi provides access inside and near the buildings for residents with smartphones. Despite enthusiasm for broadband and the adoption of many broadband-based applications and services, most organizations interviewed identified problems with broadband, particularly with the pricing, stating that the terrestrial broadband network is too costly for them to take full advantage of online services and applications. While the scope of this study was too limited to estimate long-term benefits, it found that broadband is highly valued and increasingly important to businesses and nonprofit organizations and local governments in southwest Alaska. Broadband helps businesses to be more efficient in their operations and to extend their reach to new customers and suppliers. It also helps to improve the effectiveness of public sector services such as those provided by borough and city governments and extends access to education and training. Broadband is also likely to be an important component of strategies to develop ecotourism and other ecosystem services.