• Male Urinary Incontinence: A Critical Appraisal of the Literature With Practice Recommendations

      Forcht, Deborah J. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      Urinary Incontinence (UI) is a debilitating medical condition that affects individuals’ quality of life. People with this condition describe decreased enjoyment of sexual activity, as well as increased risk of experiencing depression, and anxiety. Data show that incontinence is less prevalent in men than women, which may explain the dearth of studies focusing specifically on men. As men age, their rate of suffering from UI increases from 4.8% at ages 19 to 44 to over 21% by the age of 65 years. Additionally, men who suffer from permanent UI are more likely to be institutionalized compared to those without UI and have increased risk for suicide, infections, falls, social isolation, loss of independence and may suffer from life-altering fractures. For many patients, UI may be reversible with medical intervention. A critical appraisal of UI literature found many non-surgical male UI treatments that were effective. The evidence-based information was utilized to provide primary care providers with up to date male-specific interventions for UI.
    • Management of Pain During Intrauterine Device Insertion

      Booysen, Debra (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      Increased use of intrauterine contraception is desirable to achieve safe, highly effective, long-acting, and reversible means to prevent unintended pregnancy. For most women, intrauterine device (IUD) contraception is a viable option for protection from an unplanned pregnancy. Fear of pain during insertion is one barrier to IUD use. The aim of this project was to identify best practice evidence for different types of interventions for the management of pain during IUD insertion. Evidence for pain management strategies was critically appraised, and the most recent information synthesized into evidence-based recommendations to promote point-ofcare decisions.
    • Managing Alaska’s Petroleum Nest Egg for Maximum Sustainable Yield

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-03)
      Web Note #7 (How Much Should Alaska Save? February 2011) suggested we should think of Alaska’s petroleum wealth as an asset from which we should spend only the earnings—thus preserving that wealth for future generations, while at the same time providing a sustainable annual flow of income for current Alaskans. Based on the value of state financial assets and a projection of future petroleum revenues, in early 2011 we estimated total petroleum wealth—the Petroleum Nest Egg—to be $126 billion. That total could generate an annual sustainable flow of income, or Maximum Sustainable Yield, of $5 billion. That year actual state spending from petroleum revenues, along with the Permanent Fund dividend, was $5.5 billion, or $.5 billion more than the sustainable amount. This put a Fiscal Burden on future generations of Alaskans because it reduced the size of the nest egg. The state could have avoided that burden either by increasing non-petroleum revenues $.5 billion, or by reducing spending that much. Doing one or the other would have added $.5 billion of saving to the nest egg and so maintained its value. This Web Note revisits the calculation of the Petroleum Nest Egg, the Maximum Sustainable Yield, and the Fiscal Burden, taking into account both changes in expectations of future revenues and the size of the state budget. The estimated size of the nest egg has increased since last year, to $155 billion, because of higher oil prices and more optimistic production assumptions, so the estimated sustainable yield is up to $6.2 billion a year. But that growth has been more than offset because spending of petroleum revenues has also increased. The FY 2012 state budget exceeds the Maximum Sustainable Yield by $.8 billion, passing a Fiscal Burden of that amount on to the next generation of Alaskans. Looking beyond FY 2012, continued spending growth would have dramatic effects on the Nest Egg and Sustainable Yield. For example, if spending growth of 6% a year were to go on year after year and the growth was funded by petroleum revenues, the currently estimated Nest Egg would shrink at an accelerating rate and the Fiscal Burden would grow at an increasing rate. The Maximum Sustainable Yield for the next generation of Alaskans would drop by half in 20 years. Looked at another way, sustaining spending growth of 6% a year would require a Nest Egg of $350 billion—more than twice the current estimate. To put that amount in perspective, $350 billion is more than half the current size of the Norwegian government’s pension fund.
    • Managing Extractive Resource Wealth for Sustainability: Alaska in the Time of Falling Oil Production

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-06)
      Cash economies in many parts of the Arctic North have long been dominated by resource extraction industries such as petroleum and metal mining. These developments are often short lived, generating cycles of economic booms followed by busts. And the wealth created by these activities tends to flow South, as profits to large firms and wages to temporary residents. But in Alaska the Permanent Fund (and a number of smaller financial accounts), has captured a significant share of the wealth generated by the production of petroleum over the last 30 years. Alaska residents now have the opportunity to use this wealth (currently estimated at $45 billion in financial assets and $81 billion in the state share of oil still in the ground) to build a strong economy, not only for the current generation but for future generations of Alaskans as well. This will be a unique challenge, balancing the needs of current and future generations, the preferences of urban and rural residents, permanent and temporary citizens, and others. This paper will examine the challenges facing Alaska as it begins the task of wealth management in an era of declining petroleum production. This should provide lessons for other regions impacted by cycles of resource extractive industries.
    • Managing Extractive Resource Wealth for Sustainability: Lessons from Alaska Seen Through the Lens of Maximum Sustainable Yield

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-02)
      Alaska has enjoyed a generation of unprecedented economic growth and prosperity driven by crude oil production primarily from one giant field, Prudhoe Bay, on the North Slope. Through a number of financial savings accounts, including the Alaska Permanent Fund, the Statutory Budget Reserve, and the Constitutional Budget Reserve, the state has successfully converted a share of petroleum wealth into $55 billion in financial assets. It has been less successful in diversifying the economic base away from dominance by oil and gas production. Now oil production has fallen to less than 1/3 of its peak and this decline is projected to continue—reducing public revenues and private economic activity. This paper will explore whether the state of Alaska has the resources to be able to transition successfully to a Post-Prudhoe Bay economy, how that transition could take place, and what impediments might prevent a successful transition. This analysis will be of interest to other natural resource dependent economies that are trying to manage the cycles that resource extraction generate.
    • Managing Invasive Species: How Much Do We Spend?

      Schwörer, Tobias; Federer, Rebekka; Ferren, Howard; Alaska SeaLife Center (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07)
      Invasive species: they’re along roadways and up mountain trails; they’re in lakes and along the coast; chances are they’re in your yard. You might not recognize them for what they are—plants or animals not native to Alaska, brought here accidentally or intentionally, crowding out local species. This problem is in the early stages here, compared with what has happened in other parts of the country. But a number of invasive species are already here, and scientists think more are on the way. These species can damage ecosystems and economies—so it’s important to understand their potential economic and other effects now, when it’s more feasible to remove or contain them. Here we summarize our analysis of what public and private groups spent to manage invasive species in Alaska from 2007 through 2011. This publication is a joint product of ISER and the Alaska SeaLife Center, and it provides the first look at economic effects of invasive species here. Our findings are based on a broad survey of agencies and organizations that deal with invasive species.1 The idea for the research came out of a working group formed to help minimize the effects of invasive species in Alaska.2 Several federal and state agencies and organizations funded the work (see back page).
    • Manual of Criminal Law and Procedure

      Ring, Peter Smith; Havelock, John E.; HIckey, Daniel W.; Stern, Barry J. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-07)
      Intended to aid to Alaska law enforcement officers in the performance of their duties in the field, this manual was designed to provide brief, quick access to major points of substantive and procedural criminal law. The manual contained discussion and procedural guidelines for investigatory stops, identification procedures including line-ups, arrest, search and seizure, interrogation, as well as discussion of justification for the use of nondeadly and deadly force whether by peace officers or civilians, culpability, entrapment, trial preparation, and media relations. The section on substantive criminal law deals with a selection of crimes most likely to be encountered by "street" officers as defined with the recently enacted Revised Alaska Criminal Code (effective January 1, 1980), desribing elements of each crime, investigative hints, and differences with previous provisions of the criminal code, where relevant.
    • A Manual to Improve Efficiency in Contractor-Supplied Quality Control on Asphalt Heavy Civil Construction Pojects on State of Alaska-Owned Roads

      Robson, Alena (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      The State of Alaska requires contractors to follow specific quality standards for heavy civil asphalt construction projects. Contractors face financial and scheduling risks if these standards are not addressed effectively and in conformance with necessary criteria. Contractors must complete project work to meet customer requirements and conform to quality standards efficiently and cost effectively. Doing so ensures that the State of Alaska’s quality standards are met and contractors’ financial and schedule targets can be achieved with the most efficient use of scarce resources. Currently, there is an indirect cost savings to the contractor to perform QC in a specific manner because it reduces or in some cases eliminates rework. The desired state is to directly save money by applying efficient quality control methods. This project produced a manual that describes best practices and quality control procedures that can be applied by heavy civil asphalt construction contractors to meet necessary SOA quality standards in a more timely, cost effective and efficient way. The correct application of this manual should result in a savings of 1% on the bid cost per asphalt ton.
    • Mapping Sex Offender Addresses: The Utility of the Alaska Sex Offender Registry as a Research Data Base

      Curtis, Richard W.; Godwin, Maurice; Langworthy, Robert H.; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-10)
      The registration of sex offenders was part of a national effort to enhance public safety by permitting law enforcement officials to track the location of convicted sex offenders after their release. All fifty states have enacted legislation requiring persons convicted of various sex-related offenses to register with law enforcement agencies; many states also grant public access to all or a portion of their registries. This document reports on the Alaska Statistical Analysis Center's efforts to improve data accuracy in the Alaska Sex Offender Registry, maintained by the Alaska State Troopers, and to assess the registry's utility as a research tool.
    • Marine Exchange of Alaska

      Custard, Buddy (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-30)
    • The Mat-Su Borough in 2040: What Would Residents Like to See?

      Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04)
      Many residents of the Mat-Su Borough were attracted to the area by its rural character: low-density population, salmon streams, opportunities for recreation and hunting in undeveloped areas, and food produced by local farmers. With rapid population growth, these characteristics have been changing, and they will likely continue to change without policies to maintain or restore them. But residents can influence such change, by letting policymakers know what they value. What do Mat-Su residents want their area to look like in 2040? What value do they place on rural character and recreation opportunities? What would they be willing to pay to maintain or restore those characteristics? These are important questions for people in the borough, which borders Anchorage on the north. It has for decades been the fastest-growing area in Alaska, with a current population five times what it was in 1980.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey 2010 and Trends 2006–2010: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-01-11)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey), conducted annually since 2006, is a cooperative research effort between the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. The survey asks Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The 2010 survey was distributed to 2,088 adult heads-of-household in the Mat-Su Borough in the late summer and fall of 2010; a total of 922 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 45.9%. This sourcebook presents both the results from the 2010 Mat-Su Survey and trends from 2006–2010 in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information. Additionally, findings from a derived importance-performance analysis of the survey data are presented, as is a compilation of respondent comments.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2006: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Farrell, Chad; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-11-02)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey) was a cooperative effort on the part of Mat-Su College, the University of Alaska-Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough which asked Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The survey was distributed to every Borough household in the spring of 2006; a total of 2,600 were received, coded, and analyzed for the report. The Sourcebook provides detailed tabular results in six major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; (5) higher education; and (6) respondent background information.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2007: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Evans, Shel L.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-06-21)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey) was a cooperative effort on the part of Mat-Su College, the University of Alaska-Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough which asked Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The survey was distributed to 2,478 residents of the Mat-Su Borough in the spring of 2007; a total of 1,388 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 56.1%. The Sourcebook provides results in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2008: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-10-26)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey) was a cooperative effort on the part of Mat-Su College, the University of Alaska-Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough which asked Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The survey was distributed to 1,993 residents of the Mat-Su Borough in the spring of 2008; a total of 1,045 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 52.4%. The Sourcebook provides results in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2009: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Chamard, Sharon; Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01-08)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey) is a cooperative research effort between the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough which asked Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The survey was distributed to 2,733 residents of the Mat-Su Borough in the fall of 2009; a total of 1,406 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 51.6%. The Sourcebook provides results in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2011 and Trends 2007–2011: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Chamard, Sharon; MacAlpine, Heather (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-11-12)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey), conducted annually since 2006, is a cooperative research effort between the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. The survey asks Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The 2011 survey was distributed to 2,577 adult heads-of-household in the Mat-Su Borough in the late summer and fall of 2011; a total of 1,159 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 45.0%. This sourcebook presents both the results from the 2011 Mat-Su Survey and trends from 2006–2011 in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information. Additionally, findings from a derived importance-performance analysis of the survey data are presented, as is a compilation of respondent comments.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2012 and Trends 2008–2012: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Chamard, Sharon; MacAlpine, Heather (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-12-24)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey), conducted annually since 2006, is a cooperative research effort between the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. The survey asks Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The 2012 survey was distributed to 1,965 adult heads-of-household in the Mat-Su Borough in the late summer and fall of 2012; a total of 845 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 43.0%. This sourcebook presents both the results from the 2012 Mat-Su Survey and trends from 2008–2012 in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information. Additionally, findings from a derived importance-performance analysis of the survey data are presented, as is a compilation of respondent comments.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2014 and Trends 2009–2014: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Chamard, Sharon; Barnes, Luke; Fox, Lily; Lyons, Kris; Reinhard, Daniel; Witte, Derek (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-07-07)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey), conducted annually since 2006, is a cooperative research effort between the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. The survey asks Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The 2014 survey was distributed to 2,491 adult heads-of-household in the Mat-Su Borough in the winter and spring of 2014; a total of 1,003 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 40.3%. This sourcebook presents both the results from the 2014 Mat-Su Survey and trends from 2009–2014 in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information. A set of additional questions focusing on salmon and the environment was added to the 2014 Mat-Su Survey at the request of the Nature Conservancy. Additionally, findings from a derived importance-performance analysis of the survey data are presented, as is a compilation of respondent comments.
    • Math Anxiety in Pre-Licensure Nursing Students: a Pilot Study

      Lindley, Margaret K. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-16)
      Background Math anxiety is a common phenomenon among nursing students. A review of the literature has revealed that math anxiety interferes with student cognition which could ultimately lead to patient harm. The purpose of this project is to determine if a basic math tutorial affects levels of math anxiety in pre-licensure students at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). Methods Thirty-five students were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Math anxiety was measured with the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Rating Scale (AMARS). The experimental group participated in a math tutorial while the control group quietly waited outside of the classroom. Results There is no evidence that the math tutorial was useful in reducing math anxiety. Conclusions Both groups of participants had a decrease in math anxiety, yet it is uncertain how significantly the math tutorial (Appendix E) affected their math anxiety levels.