• Observations on Alaska’s Economy and Economic Implications of Alaska’s Fiscal Choices

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-03-30)
    • Officer Drug- and Alcohol-Related Workload Daily Activity Log: User's Guide

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2002-08)
      This guide provides instructions to officers of the Anchorage Police Department for recording daily log forms as part of a study of the extent to which Anchorage patrol officer activities are the result of, or are in some way associated with, drugs and/or alcohol. Data collection was conducted over a seven-day period in August 2002.
    • Officer-Involved Shootings in Anchorage 1993-2013

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      This article presents findings from the December 2013 report Officer-Involved Shootings in Anchorage 1993–2013, which describes shootings involving officers of the Anchorage Police Department (APD) for the period January 1, 1993 through May 11, 2013.
    • Officer-Involved Shootings in Anchorage 1993–2013

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12-11)
      This report describes situational, officer, and citizen characteristics of the 45 officer-involved shootings in Anchorage for the period 1 Jan 1993 through 11 May 2013 as recorded in Anchorage Police Department (APD) criminal investigation files. An “officer-involved shooting” is defined as an incident in which a sworn APD employee purposefully discharged a firearm with the intent of stopping a human being while acting under color of law, including firing at vehicles when the intent is to stop the vehicle. A total of 45 officer-involved shootings occurred during the 20-year study period. APD policy with regard to use of force and investigation of officer-involved shootings is also described.
    • Oil Pumps Alaska's Economy to Twice the Size - But What's Ahead?

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-02)
      Oil money has driven most of the growth and paid for state government operations in Alaska for 40 years. We’ve all gotten used to that money, so it’s easy to underestimate how much of the state’s prosperity is built on oil. Think about this: without oil, the economy today would be only half the size. But now times are changing. The North Slope is producing just a third the oil it once did—and there’s a danger Alaskans will assume the state can keep going the way it is, without future oil development. Not true.
    • Oil Spill Modeling for the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas

      Ravens, Tom; Brunswick, Dana (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-29)
    • Older Women Face Psychological and Physical Abuse

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article examines psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and compares these rates to national rates. Psychological abuse includes expressive aggression by intimate partners and coercive control by intimate partners. Physical abuse includes physical violence by intimate partners. It also includes sexual violence, by both intimate partners and non-intimate partners. Estimates are provided for both psychological and physical abuse. Alaska estimates come from the 2010–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) and national estimates from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Results show that one in nine Alaskan women aged 60 or older (11.5%) experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year. These rates are all significantly higher than national rates.
    • Optimal Portfolio Management in Alaska: A Case Study on Risk Characteristics of Environmental Consulting Companies

      Willingham, Katura (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      Sharp declines in global oil prices have led to a marked contraction in Alaska’s natural resource dependent economy. This, coupled with record the State’s budgetary shortfalls and a decrease in incoming federal dollars, has created a climate where environmental consulting companies must accept riskier projects to balance portfolio growth and security. As a result, companies must adopt a risk-based portfolio management approach as both a high level strategy and a core management practice. It is important to specifically identify projects best suited for an organization’s tolerance for risk based off of the supply and demand of the industry in rapidly changing economic conditions. Therefore, the aims of this project report are to help environmental consulting companies identify risk characteristics and manage their portfolio, as well as develop a tool to guide decision-making and selecting projects best suited for a companies’ portfolio strategy. The results of this research may provide Alaska based environmental companies with a clear understanding of the types of projects that offer both development and financial security for an organization. This research paper will present the methodology, results, and an environmental consulting portfolio management tool.
    • Outpatient education and medication adherence

      Sherwood, Veronica (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-02-01)
    • Overpaid or Underpaid? Public Employee Compensation in the State of Alaska

      Guettabi, Mouhcine; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-07-01)
      Are state workers better paid than their counterparts in private industry? That question is likely to come up more often, as the state deals with a huge budget shortfall. The answer is generally no, but there are exceptions. We analyzed the question in two ways, using different data sources for cash wages but the same assumptions about benefit levels.1 Using two sources helped us better answer the question, and each yielded the same broad conclusion: state workers are not on average paid more. That’s true, whether we consider just wages, or total compensation— wages plus benefits. But there are significant differences in pay and total compensation of public and private workers in individual occupations. We did this research for the Alaska Department of Administration (see back page). Below we summarize our findings, and inside report more details.
    • Overview of 'Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations. The briefing was coordinated through the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the Indian Law Resource Center, and the National Congress of American Indians.
    • Overview of Sexual Assault in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-08-20)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation provides an overview of key results from UAA Justice Center research and statistics from other sources on sexual assault in Alaska, presented before a roundtable discussion with officials from the U.S. Department of Justice sponsored by the Alaska Native Justice Center.
    • Overview of UAA Justice Center Violence against Women Research

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-02-18)
      This Powerpoint presentation presents an overview of key results from Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska, including studies on sexual assault, stalking, and domestic violence through February 2009.
    • Overview of Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations.
    • Overweight and Obesity Knowledge Assessment of Alaskan Nurse Practitioners

      Cerutti, Kelly M (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      The purpose of this project was to describe Alaskan Nurse Practitioners (NPs) current practice and beliefs regarding overweight and obesity, and to identify barriers that may prevent evidence based management. A descriptive study was conducted using a convenience sample of 116 Alaskan NPs who completed The Treatment of Obesity Questionnaire. Findings revealed which factors NPs considered to determine risk status; their current management strategies; barriers to treatment; and, their beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity. An open-ended question revealed other treatment strategies, barriers, and beliefs regarding the treatment of overweight and obese patients.
    • Parole and Probation in Alaska, 2002–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-05)
      This fact sheet presents data on the characteristics of offenders who came under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) between 2002 and 2016. Probation and parole offender data are from the Alaska Department of Corrections’ annual Offender Profile publication. Overall trends saw numbers of probationers and parolees increasing from 2002 to 2012, then decreasing through 2016. The majority of probationers and parolees are between 20 and 34 years old. The trend for both males and females followed the overall trend, increasing from 2002 to 2012 then decreasing. On average, from 2002 to 2016, Alaska Natives were 26.7% of the probation and parole population, Asian & or Pacific Islander 4.1%, Black 8.7%, and White 56.1%.
    • The Path to a Fiscal Solution: Use Earnings from All Our Assets

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-23)
      Thanks to a combination of good decisions and a little luck, today Governor Hammond’s vision has become a reality. More than $60 billion in financial accounts now generates more income for the state government than petroleum production. Yet we continue to rely mostly on current petroleum revenues to pay for public services—and as oil production declines, “sliding down the falling Prudhoe Bay revenue curve” is proving to be a formula for fiscal and economic disaster. In fiscal year 2016, General Fund revenues are expected to be only about $2.2 billion. That will leave an apparent “deficit” of about $3.3 billion, based on spending of $5.5 billion. But the state doesn’t have to face such a huge shortfall. There is a straightforward solution that Jay Hammond foresaw: using both current revenues and earnings from the state’s portfolio of assets (financial accounts and future petroleum revenues) to pay for public services.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Hirshberg, Diane; Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-14)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-01)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program. The following table provides a look at advanced offerings at different school levels. Each of these offerings is discussed in the report.
    • Pediatric Lead Screening in the United States: A Comparative Analysis

      Sykes, Genevieve (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-01-05)
      The purpose of this project is identification of approaches to pediatric lead screening in the United States by each of the fifty states and evaluation of whether best practice is being utilized. Data was obtained from publicly available state based websites and interaction with state departments; there were no participants in this project. The data was compared and contrasted among each of the fifty states and against current screening recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]. Only one state, Delaware, has screening recommendations current with CDC standards. There is a large amount of variation between how state approaches pediatric lead screening. Several recommendations were proposed for the improvement of pediatric lead screening in the United States, including the following; all test results be reported in every state, states should assess need for screening universally versus screening Medicaid-eligible children only, states update their geographic risk areas yearly, screening recommendations be made available in a single area, and all questionnaire include questions about symptoms, lead sources, hand washing, and children with risk.