• Youth Alcohol Access, Consumption, and Consequences in Anchorage, Alaska: 2012 Update

      Rivera, Marny; Parker, Khristy; McMullen, Jennifer (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-12-10)
      This report identifies indicators of underage drinking in Anchorage, Alaska, which can be used in assessing changes brought about by strategies designed to reduce underage access to alcohol and consequences associated with underage drinking. Indicators are addressed under the categories of underage access to alcohol, social norms and perceptions associated with underage drinking, alcohol consumption patterns, and consequences of underage drinking. Consequences examined include school-related consequences, risky behavior, and legal consequences of underage drinking. Alcohol abuse by people under 21 years of age requiring substance abuse treatment, health and safety consequences of underage drinking, and economic consequences of underage drinking are also discussed.
    • Youth Alcohol Access, Consumption, and Consequences in Anchorage, Alaska: Identification of Indicators

      Rivera, Marny; McMullen, Jennifer (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2010-12-15)
      This report identifies indicators of underage drinking in Anchorage, Alaska, which can be used in assessing changes brought about by strategies designed to reduce underage access to alcohol and consequences associated with underage drinking. Indicators are addressed under the categories of underage access to alcohol, social norms and perceptions associated with underage drinking, alcohol consumption patterns, and consequences of underage drinking. Consequences examined include school-related consequences, risky behavior, and legal consequences of underage drinking. Alcohol abuse by people under 21 years of age requiring substance abuse treatment, health and safety consequences of underage drinking, and economic consequences of underage drinking are also discussed.
    • Youth Attitudes and the Police: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to sixth-graders, ""Youth Attitudes and the Police," focuses on the work and responsibilities of police officers, and their relationships with kids. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as local newspaper stories about police and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Youth in Crisis Characteristics of Homeless Youth Served by Covenant House Alaska

      Martin, Stephanie; Meléndez, Alejandra Villalobos (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-03-03)
      This research is the result of a partnership between Covenant House Alaska and the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska, Anchorage, as part of a national effort, initiated by Covenant House Institute, to create partnerships between Covenant House service providers and academic institutions. This report documents trends in use of Crisis Center at Covenant House Alaska and the characteristics of its clients. Use of Crisis Center, measured by visits and length of stay, has been increasing since 2003. The number of youth coming to Covenant House Crisis Center from outside of Anchorage is increasing, as is the number Alaska Natives served by Covenant House. Data indicate that many after aging out of foster care, many youth end up at Covenant House. Similarly many who receive mental health care outside of the state, return to Alaska and end up at Crisis Center. Few have high school diplomas or GED and three out of four are unemployed.
    • Youth Marijuana and Prescription Drug Abuse in Anchorage

      Rivera, Marny; Lepage, Cory R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-09-21)
      This article examines results of the Adult Perceptions of Anchorage Youth: 2015 Survey (APAYS) to examine perceptions and concerns of Anchorage adults, both parents and non-parents, about youth marijuana use and youth non-medical use of prescription drugs. A resource list is included.
    • Youth Violence Study, Anchorage, AK: Youth Violence Progress Report

      Rosay, André B.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03-16)
      This slide presentation describes youth violence in Anchorage by providing initial comparisons between current Anchorage conditions and conditions of the past five to ten years, as well as initial comparisons between Anchorage and the rest of the U.S. Data shows that youth violence in Anchorage is not a serious problem, is at levels similar to or lower than national rates of youth violence, and is declining in Anchorage as it is nationally. Youth violence is also not perceived to be a serious problem in Anchorage, according to a public survey of Anchorage residents. Nonetheless, efforts to reduced and prevent youth violence in Anchorage are necessary; this progress report identifies some successful programs, and suggests how to develop policies to reduce levels of youth violence in Anchorage.
    • Yukon-Kuskokwim Storm Surge Nowcast/Forecast Model and Preliminary Norton Sound Storm Surge Model

      Ravens, Tom; Allen, Jon S.; Reardon, Kristen (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-29)
    • Yup’ik Language Assistance Tribal Outreach: Report to the Alaska Division of Elections

      Martin, Stephanie; Killorin, Mary; Sharp, Suzanne; DeRoche, Patricia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-10-15)
      The Division of Elections contracted with the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Alaska Anchorage to help develop a network of key tribal organization and village representatives in the Bethel census area to work with the division on their Yup’ik language assistance program. The division asked ISER to help them communicate with tribes about the division’s current programs and to document additional ways that the division can improve its language assistance program. The Alaska Division of Elections is required under the Federal Voting Rights Act (VRA) to provide language assistance to voters in areas where more than 5% of the voting age citizens are members of a single-language minority and are limited English proficient. In July 2008, a federal court ordered the division to take the following remedial actions, many of which the division had already taken prior to the court order: 1. Provide mandatory poll worker training. 2. Hire a language assistance coordinator fluent in Yup'ik. 3. Recruit bi-lingual poll workers or translators. 4. Provide sample ballots in written Yup'ik. 5. Provide pre-election publicity in Yup'ik. 6. Ensure the accuracy of translations. 7. Provide a Yup'ik glossary of election terms. 8. Submit pre-election and post-election reports. Although the division has a Yup’ik language assistance program and has been addressing the court order, interviews with Bethel census area residents show that some people are unaware of the elements in the division’s language assistance plan. In addition, some Bethel area residents said they feel the election workers and the division should interpret the meaning of the ballot measures and explain the positions of the various candidates—activities that are forbidden by state statute. ISER agreed to help the division address this lack of awareness and the misconceptions about their programs by contacting tribal organizations and inviting them to attend a meeting in Bethel, Alaska, on May 27, 2009. Part I of this report, issued in July 2009, describes ISER’s contacts with tribal organizations and summarizes the comments and feedback from the participants at the election outreach meeting in Bethel. Part II describes ISER’s post-meeting contacts with tribal organizations and meeting participants and summarizes their responses to the post-meeting survey.