• Section 8 Housing & Crime: Screwed or Skewed?

      Gallagher, Kathleen; Payne, Troy C.; Eck, John E.; Frank, James (School of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, 2010-11-18)
      This poster presentation examines the claim that Section 8 tenants in a small midwestern city in Ohio are consuming too many police resources. Based on previous research regarding public housing projects and perceptions of public housing and crime, the city has become concerned that the level of police services that are dedicated to residents with housing vouchers is in excess of the average residential tenant.
    • Seizing Opportunities for Energy Efficiency: How Are we Doing

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-05-01)
    • Selected Results from Local Evaluation of Reclaiming Futures, Anchorage, AK

      Henjum, Barb; Schaff, Karin; Moffitt, Linda; Begich, Thomas S.; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-04)
      This Powerpoint presentation briefly reports on results of an evaluation of Reclaiming Futures Anchorage, which is one of 10 founding Reclaiming Futures projects funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to create new approaches to help teens in trouble with drugs, alcohol and crime. It partners with courts, treatment facilities, detention facilities, and community to promote new opportunities and standards of care in juvenile justice to improve the improvement of drug and alcohol treatment, expand and coordinate services, and find jobs and volunteer work for young people in trouble with the law.
    • Selective Return of Criminal Law Activity to Alaska Native Villages: Neocolonialism or Revitalization of Tribal Sovereignty?

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1990-03)
      As Alaska struggles with criminal justice delivery to Alaska Native villages, many experiments have been undertaken or postulated which would reinvigorate criminal law activity in these rural places. Initial enthusiasm for alleviation of burdens on the formal system has been replaced with a state concern that village activity will be viewed as tribal activity. The author isolates areas where the needs of the state and villages can be met without feeding the flames of the conflict between state sovereignty and village tribal sovereignty.
    • Senate Bill 64 - Omnibus Crime Bill

      Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-22)
      This brief article describes provisions of SB 64, the omnibus crime bill enacted during the 2013–2014 session of the Alaska Legislature. Sidebar accompanying the article "The Alaska Criminal Justice Commission: A Legislative Call for Action."
    • Senate Bill 91: Summary of Policy Reforms

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-09-21)
      This article highlights provisions of Senate Bill 91, "Omnibus Criminal Law & Procedure; Corrections Act," related to the recommendations of the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission. SB91 was signed into law on July 11, 2016.
    • Sentencing Issues: A Summary

      Ring, Peter Smith; Erwin, Robert C.; Israel, Jerold (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-02)
      This document contains three summaries prepared as an introduction for members of the Alaska Legislature to criminal sentencing issues: (1) A paper on presumptive sentencing reviews the study "Fair and Certain Punishment: Report of the Twentieth Century Fund Task Force on Criminal Sentencing" (McGraw-Hill, 1976), and presents a guide for legislative action prior to the enactment of a presumptive sentencing system. (2) A report on sentencing standards in Alaska presents excerpts from Alaska Supreme Court Justice Robert C. Erwin's article "Five Years of Sentence Review in Alaska" (5 U.C.L.A. Law Review 1 (1975)). (3) A final paper, "An Introduction to Basic Sentencing Issues" – an edited version of a memorandum by Jerold Israel of University of Michigan Law School, discusses a series of proposals that acknowledged experts have advanced concerning the reform of the laws governing sentencing.
    • Sequential Intercept Model: Framework for a ‘Wicked Problem’

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Sequential Intercept Model offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system and into community-based treatment. This article reviews the 2015 book "The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal Justice" (New York: Oxford University Press), which looks at the success of programs along the intercept continuum. A workshop on the model sponsored by the Alaska Department of Corrections will be held in Anchorage in May 2018.
    • Seven Years of Individualized Training: An Examination of Specialized Training Grants Funded by the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, 1973 through 1979

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-04-15)
      Prior to the establishment of the Criminal Justice Center at the University of Alaska (renamed the Justice Center in 1979), no program has attempted to train and educate Alaska justice practitioners on a continuing basis and at all agency levels. The Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, through the Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, has attempted to deal with this training problem on an interim basement through the Specialized Training Grant program, which enables "state and local police officers, correctional officers, prosecutors, public defenders, and court personnel [to obtain] specialized training sponsored by other agencies and institutions," often involving travel out-of-state for programs largely unavailable in Alaska. This study examines individualized grants funded for the years 1973–1979 as a means of measuring the effectiveness of the Specialized Training Grant program as on approach to the continuing professionalization of Alaska's criminal justice personnel.
    • Sex Offender Registries and Notification Programs

      Periman, Deborah (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-05-01)
      Presents a brief history of sex offender registries and notification programs nationally and in Alaska; describes provisions of Alaska's registry/notification laws; and discusses recent research findings about the effectiveness of such laws and their impact on offenders.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Program: Initial Recidivism Study

      Mander, Anthony M.; Atrops, Martin E.; Barnes, Allan R.; Munafo, Roseanne (Offender Programs, Alaska Department of Corrections; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-07-31)
      This report presents results of a recidivism study of participants in the Sex Offender Treatment Program at Hiland Mountain Correctional Center, Alaska Department of Corrections, from January 1987 to August 1995. The report provides an overview and history of sex offender treatment in Alaska as well as a literature review of other studies and findings on this area of treatment. The Alaska study, which was the first conducted of the treatment program, found that any level of treatment achieved resulted in less recidivism, with the longer the period of treatment, the lower the recidivism. The study also noted the high percentage of Alaska Natives in the program and the history of alcohol and substance abuse presented by many sex offenders. The majority of offenders in the program were guilty of assaulting children. The study discusses the program's cost benefits as well as the implications of its findings for probation and parole.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Program: Preliminary Description

      Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1995-05-10)
      This report provides a summary of the history of sex offender treatment in Alaska, including the current status of treatment programs offered by the Alaska Department of Corrections, a review of literature on sex offender treatment and recidivism issues, and a summary of the descriptive characteristics of individuals who came in contact with the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center from January 1987 to March 1993.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Project: Literature Review

      Barnes, Allan R.; Baca, Melanie; Dix, Melody; Flahr, Shelly; Gaal, Cathy; Whitaker, Max; Moeglein, Samantha; Morgheim, Nicol (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1994-07-22)
      A comprehensive literature review on recidivism by and the treatment of sex offenders.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2006-05)
      The outcomes of sexual assaults involving one suspect and one victim reported to the Anchorage Police Department (APD) in 2000 to 2003 were examined. Overall, 1,235 sexual assaults were reported to APD during this period, of which 1,074 involved one suspect and one victim. Data were collected on 1,052 of these cases to learn how the Alaska Department of Law disposed of these cases. Of the 1,052 cases examined, 188 (17.9%) were referred to the Department of Law, 127 were accepted for prosecution, and 111 resulted in a conviction. Clearly, the point of greatest attrition is from report to referral, with 85.2 percent of reported sexual assaults not being referred for prosecution. However, most offenders whose cases reach prosecutors are held accountable in some degree through the imposition of criminal sanctions.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the outcomes of sexual assault cases reported to the Anchorage Police Department between January 2000 and December 2003. The data include 1,052 cases involving one suspect and one victim (85% of all reported sexual assaults). Cases and charges were tracked through the Alaska Department of Law to determine what was referred, accepted, and convicted. * Overall, 18% of cases were referred for prosecution. The most common referred charge was a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-nine percent of referred charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 12% of cases were accepted for prosecution. The greatest point of attrition was from report to referral. Once referred, 68% of cases were accepted for prosecution. Sixty-eight percent of charges were accepted by the Department of Law as referred. The most common reasons for not accepting a charge as referred were evidentiary reasons. The most common accepted charge was also a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-five percent of accepted charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 11% of cases resulted in a conviction. Once accepted, 87% of cases resulted in a conviction. Although convictions were common in accepted cases, accepted charges were often dismissed. While 87% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction, 59% of accepted charges were dismissed. Ninety percent of guilty findings were a result of plea bargaining. With plea bargaining, some charges were dismissed but a conviction was still secured. Fifty-six percent of convicted charges were sexual assault charges. The most common convicted charge was for assault, followed by sexual assault in the second degree.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-05)
      The outcomes of sexual assaults involving one suspect and one victim reported to the Anchorage Police Department (APD) in 2000 to 2003 were examined. Overall, 1,235 sexual assaults were reported to APD during this period, of which 1,074 involved one suspect and one victim. Data were collected on 1,052 of these cases to learn how the Alaska Department of Law disposed of these cases. Of the 1,052 cases examined, 188 (17.9%) were referred to the Department of Law, 127 were accepted for prosecution, and 111 resulted in a conviction. Clearly, the point of greatest attrition is from report to referral, with 85.2 percent of reported sexual assaults not being referred for prosecution. However, most offenders whose cases reach prosecutors are held accountable in some degree through the imposition of criminal sanctions.
    • Sexual Assault in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-08-03)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation provides an overview of key results from Justice Center research on sexual assault in Alaska through August 2009, with discussion of victimization and its costs, victim characteristics, suspect characteristics, victim-suspect relationships, alcohol use, and criminal case processing (referral, prosecution, and disposition), and recidivism.
    • Sexual Assault Kit Initiative: Alaska Making Progress

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      Victim-centered policies being developed by the Alaska Department of Public Safety for processing unsubmitted and untested sexual assault kits collected by Alaska State Troopers are one part of the state’s efforts to tackle more than 3,000 untested kits under grants from the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Age of Victim

      Morris, Catherine; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by age of victim. Analysis compares the 210 victims that were less than 21 years old to the 339 victims that were 21 years old or older. Most suspects were older than their victims. On average, suspects were 5 years older than victims.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Community Council

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001 by the five community councils with the highest incidence of sexual assauults reported to police during the study period: Downtown, Fairview, Mountain View, Northeast, and Spenard. Comparison date is presented for these five community councils on victim and suspect characteristics including age, race, and alcohol use; assault characteristics including day of week and location of assault; and victim-suspect relationship.