• Blackfish Lessons on Environmental Sustainability, Food, and Indigenous Culture

      Swensen, Thomas (2017-09-11)
      This essay, “Blackfish Lessons on Environmental Sustainability, Food, and Indigenous Culture,” examines Yup’ik interventions into understanding the place of human-nonhuman animal relations in regard to ecological sustainability. In lending consideration to Indigenous culture, the first part of the essay explicates the Yup’ik way of living, the Yuuyaraq, and its relationship to the environment. Then the essay turns toward two Yup’ik stories about blackfish, John Active’s “Why Subsistence is a Matter of Cultural Survival: A Yup’ik Point of View” (2001) and Emily Johnson’s “Blackfish,” taken from The Thank-You Bar recorded performance (Johnson, 2009), that speak to the imbrications of Indigenous culture and the environment.
    • Blended Learning in Culinary Arts: A Case Study in Learning and Perception

      Everett, Naomi S. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      There is great need for skillful culinary employees for a wide variety of positions in the hospitality, hotel, and restaurant industry. Culinary school provides a baseline educational experience for students looking to pursue this career field. Culinary instructors find themselves obligated to discover ways to promote student learning in classic culinary competencies while evolving with a population that is tech-savvy and requires more than the standard lecture and rote memorization of materials. This paper describes an exploratory study that incorporated videos as part of a blended learning model in a traditional face-to-face culinary arts class at the University of Alaska Anchorage. The curriculum was on poultry fabrication, and data collection focused on students’ skills and their perceptions of the blended learning activities. Initial feedback suggest that including videos in the culinary arts classroom facilitates learning, and though they cannot replace in-class live demonstrations, are beneficial educational accompaniments. Recommendations for practice and implications are discussed.
    • Book Review of Village Journey by Thomas R. Berger

      Conn, Stephen (1985-09)
      This article reviews Village Journey: The Report of the Alaska Native Review Commission by Thomas R. Berger (New York: Hill and Wang, 1985). The Alaska Native Review Commission, headed by former Canadian parliamentarian and justice Thomas Berger, initiated an inquiry into the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) in 1984, visiting 62 villages and hearing 1600 residents to determine ANCSA's impact on Alaska Native lands and communities. Berger found that ANCSA had placed Native land at risk, endangering not only its title but the rights of Alaska Natives to subsist upon it.
    • Brady Statute Data: Adjudicated Mental Defectives and Involuntary Mental Commitments

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09-08)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the first of four reports on these categories, describes how adjudicated mental defectives and involuntary mental commitments can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The report discussed federal statutory definitions of the terms adjudicated as a mental defective, committed to a mental institution, and legal authority; compares these terms with those current in Alaska Statues and used by social service and mental health agencies in the state; and describes, in general, data held by federal, state, local, and private agencies in Alaska. At present, there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either of the two categories with any accuracy: besides technical difficulties in getting different databases to "talk" to each other, records are not kept on mentally ill individuals, and even if they were, access would be prohibited in the face of federal and state laws regarding privacy.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibits the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. These reports describe potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, illegal aliens, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, are the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety—Executive Summary

      Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Atwell, Cassie (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibited the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. This executive report summarizes study findings on potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, noncitizens in the U.S. illegally or unlawfully, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and briefly discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, were the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Illegally or Unlawfully in the United States

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the fourth of four reports on these categories, describes how undocumented immigrants who are unlawfully in the United States can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. It was found that the most feasibile means for obtaining information for the purposes of Brady background checks would be the Verification Information System (VIS) of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). However, project researchers received no response from INS to inquiries about requirements of access to VIS.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who are Subject to a Court Order Restraining Them from Threatening or Committing Acts of Domestic Violence or Abuse

      Atwell, Cassie; Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-03-06)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the second of four reports on these categories, describes how persons subject to a domestic violence restraining order can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The state is rapidly moving to the point where all individuals who meet the Brady definition for this category will be identified, the information housed in a separate database, and reported to federal agencies. AS 18.65.540 provides for a central registry of Domestic Violence Protective Orders, a product of the (state) Domestic Violence Prevention and Victim Protection Act of 1996.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Unlawful Users of or Addicted to Any Controlled Substances

      Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the third of four reports on these categories, describes how persons who are unlawful users or addicted to any controlled substance can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. At this time there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either addicts or controlled substance abusers with any accuracy. Records are not kept on addicts or controlled substance abusers, and even if they were, because of the right to privacy, access would be denied. However the Criminal Case Intake and Disposition form is currently used statewide by law enforcement personnel. It could be modified with little effort to capture information on some addiction/controlled substance abuse events for the purpose of Brady background checks.
    • Bridging Justice Communities: A Professional Workshop Curriculum for Alaska Natives

      University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1998-12)
      Despite the complicated legal and justice questions which present themselves regularly in the life of the Alaska Native community, Native employment in justice system positions — in the bureaucracies and agencies which administer the state and federal justice systems — is low. The program outlined in this document presents a twelve-day to two-week educational workshop for Alaska Native participants focusing on opportunities for careers in the justice system.
    • A Brief Look at Gangs and the Fairbanks Gang Assessment

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-07-01)
      This research overview presents selected information from the 2010 Fairbanks Gang Assessment, along with national data about gang member demographics, gang membership motivation, and problems caused by gangs.
    • A Brief Look at VPSOs and Violence against Women Cases

      UAA Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2011-11)
      This study examined sexual assault and sexual abuse of a minor cases that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and assault cases involving domestic violence that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004. All analyses were restricted to cases that included only one victim and only one adult suspect. From Alaska Department of Law records, we examined whether cases were referred for prosecution, whether cases were accepted for prosecution, and whether cases resulted in a conviction. We also examined if these legal resolutions were different when the first responder was a local paraprofessional police officer (i.e., a Village Public Safety Officer, a Village Police Officer, or a Tribal Police Officer). • Overall, local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability of referral for sexual assault cases, had no effect on the probability of referral for sexual abuse of a minor cases, and decreased the probability of referral for assault cases involving domestic violence. (Cases are referred for prosecution by the Alaska State Troopers to the Alaska Department of Law.) • For all three offenses (sexual assault, sexual abuse of a minor, and assault involving domestic violence), local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability that cases would be accepted for prosecution. • Local paraprofessional police did not impact the probability of conviction in sexual assault cases, but significantly increased the probability of conviction in sexual abuse of minor cases and in assault cases involving domestic violence. Cases that resulted in a conviction may have been plea bargained to reduced charges.
    • Broadband for Rural Development in Southwest Alaska

      Hudson, Heather E. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-03)
    • Broadband Issues and Opportunities for Alaska

      Hudson, Heather E. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-03-28)
    • Broadband Policies for the North: A Comparative Analysis

      Hudson, Heather E. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-11)
    • Building Evaluation Capacity for Gender-Specific Programming

      Schafer, N. E.; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-10)
      This report provides a basis for future evaluations of gender-specific caseloads in Alaska and provides materials which to help in formulating future programs and evaluations. Three tasks were involved in setting a base for future evaluations of the program: reviewing recent literature on female delinquency and gender-specific programming; developing a local resource manual of services for girls and young women in the Anchorage area; and establishing baseline data on female delinquency in Alaska, with particular focus on female delinquency in Anchorage.
    • Burglary in Alaska: 1985–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-07)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1985–2012 on the property crime of burglary, including burglary rates, time and place of occurrence, and the value of property stolen during burglaries reported to police. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program.
    • Bush Justice and Development in Alaska: Why Legal Process in Village Alaska Has Not Kept up with Changing Social Needs [original paper]

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-02-22)
      This paper analyzes the evolution of the working legal process in the predominantly Alaska Native villages of rural Alaska after Alaska statehood. Replacement of territorial government by highly centralized state justice agencies led to a weakening in the working relationship between formal law and extralegal mechanisms such as the village council. This change coincided with development and other changes which demanded more formal legal presence in villages rather than less. The paper reviews the fate of various bush justice reform efforts made by state agencies and efforts by villages to respond to justice needs. The author suggests that the inadequacy of legal process in village Alaska is not due primarily to language problems or Native confusion about Western law; rather, the "bush justice problem" is caused by a lack of resources, a lack of legal planning for development, and the state governmental system's lack of accountability to its rural constituency. The author recommends experimentation at village level, better planning, and greater autonomy for villages.
    • Bush Justice and Development in Alaska: Why Legal Process in Village Alaska Has Not Kept up with Changing Social Needs [revision]

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-06-28)
      This paper analyzes the evolution of the working legal process in the predominantly Alaska Native villages of rural Alaska after Alaska statehood. Replacement of territorial government by highly centralized state justice agencies led to a weakening in the working relationship between formal law and extralegal mechanisms such as the village council. This change coincided with development and other changes which demanded more formal legal presence in villages rather than less. The paper reviews the fate of various bush justice reform efforts made by state agencies and efforts by villages to respond to justice needs. The author suggests that the inadequacy of legal process in village Alaska is not due primarily to language problems or Native confusion about Western law; rather, the "bush justice problem" is caused by a lack of legal planning for development, the state governmental system's lack of accountability to its rural constituency, and a lack of control by villages over the mixture of formal law, extralegal authority and nonlegal social control appropriate to their needs, both present and future.
    • Business Improvement Recommendation

      Youlo, Walter Y. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The purpose of the ProBrainiac Project Management Plan (PMP) document is to provide the project stakeholders with an approved working guide for how the project will be managed during execution. The PMP outlines how the project work will be managed by the Project Manager (PM), project sponsor throughout the project phases ensuring efficient, timely, execution of the project and deliverable as outlined in the project charter.