• Alaska Arctic: Improving Awareness & Broadening Partnerships

      Robinson, James (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-29)
    • Alaska Army National Guard Construction Planning Process Improvement

      Nielson, Jeremy (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      The Alaska Army National Guard (AKARNG) is a jointly funded agency run under a cooperative agreement between the federal and state governments. Recognized as a state agency, the AKARNG reports to the governor for domestic response and trains for federal missions. With this relationship, the AKARNG receives funds from the National Guard Bureau (NGB) and the Alaska State Legislature for the execution of construction projects. Under the cooperative agreement, the AKARNG follows state procedures and uses the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (ADOT/PF) to manage projects. The AKARNG Construction and Facilities Maintenance Officer (CFMO) ensures federal oversight of all AKARNG facilities. This project looks at the relationship between the AKARNG CFMO and ADOT/PF as they collaborate and plan construction projects for the AKARNG. The primary deliverables for this project are a current state swim lane chart (SLC) with written description and an improved state SLC with a written description. The goal of this project is to offer the AKARNG a roadmap for process improvement. The current and improved SLCs were produced by conducting research and engaging with stakeholders through interviews and questionnaires. Stakeholders were engaged throughout and offered quality oversight of the deliverables. The improved state SLC incorporated regulatory compliance and previously omitted policy requirements. When necessary, the improved state SLC included the addition or subtraction of steps to add value to the process. This project delivered the AKARNG a scalable depiction of their construction planning process and recommendations for improvement.
    • Alaska as a Case Study of OJJDP-Mandated Jail Monitoring

      Schafer, N. E.; Read, Emily E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1990-10-03)
      The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency prevention has mandated that all states monitor jail records for the presence of juveniles and inspect jails and lock-ups in which juveniles might be detained for sight and sound separation. The experience of Alaska in complying with this mandate is instructive. In the largest state in the union 99 facilities in a monitoring universe of 111 (89.1 %) are accessible only by air or water. Alaska's jail monitoring plan accommodated this inaccessibility. The plan and 1989 monitoring activities are explained and discussed. As the largest state in the Union Alaska has had some unique problems complying with the mandate of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Act to monitor secure facilities for the presence of juveniles. In spite of these problems Alaska has produced a model monitoring plan and has successfully completed three years of compliance monitoring activities. The monitoring process and the problems associated with monitoring activities are useful for other states to consider as they review their monitoring plans.
    • Alaska Boards and Commissions: Results of the Alaska Citizen Members Survey

      Knudsen, Kristin S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-07-19)
      This report presents results of a survey of lay adjudicators in mixed-administrative tribunals in Alaska. Mixed administrative tribunals are appointed boards or commissions in which lay members decide legal issues with the involvement of a professional administrative law judge. This involvement varies in degree and methods, depending on the tribunal’s rules and statutes. The report describes reported participation, role perception, attitudes toward law, recruitment, and satisfaction with experience.
    • Alaska career pathways: A baseline analysis

      DeFeo, Dayna Jean; Hirshberg, Diane; LeCompte, Cathy (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-06-01)
      This report details the findings from a 2013 statewide study of career pathways (CP) and programs of study (PoS) in secondary districts in Alaska. Twenty-seven of Alaska’s 54 districts provided data around the maturity of their CP/PoS, the availability of different CP/PoS, how career planning is addressed, and the availability of courses and PoS in the Health Sciences cluster. The differences between urban and rural communities are often noted in conversations around education, programming and policy in Alaska, and the data in this report reflect this established phenomenon. The contribution of this report is in helping to demystify and contextualize some of these known differences, and to make differentiated recommendations for moving forward.
    • Alaska Civic Learning Assessment Project: Final Report and Policy Brief

      Hill, Alexandra; Hirshberg, Diane; Fickel, Letitia (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-11-01)
      In late 2002, the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) and Carnegie Corporation of New York, in consultation with the Corporation for National and Community Service, convened a series of meetings involving some of the nation’s most distinguished and respected scholars and practitioners in the area of civic education. The purpose was to determine, based on solid data and evidence, the components of effective and feasible civic learning programs. Representing a diversity of political views, a variety of disciplines, and various approaches, these individuals shared a common vision of a richer, more comprehensive approach to civic education in the United States, notwithstanding some disagreement about aspects of how civic education should be conducted. Their final report, entitled The Civic Mission of Schools, is a compelling statement of the national landscape regarding civic learning and the critical role that schools play in fostering citizenship education. Below is an excerpt from the report’s Executive Summary: For more than 250 years, Americans have shared a vision of a democracy in which all citizens understand, appreciate, and engage actively in civic and political life. In recent decades, however, increasing numbers of Americans have disengaged from civic and political institutions such as voluntary associations, religious congregations, community-based organizations, and political and electoral activities such as voting and being informed about public issues. Young people reflect these trends: they are less likely to vote and are less interested in political discussion and public issues than either their older counterparts or young people of past decades. As a result, many young Americans may not be prepared to participate fully in our democracy now and when they become adults. Recognizing that individuals do not automatically become free and responsible citizens but must be educated for citizenship, scholars; teachers; civic leaders; local, state, and federal policymakers; and federal judges, have with the encouragement of the president of the United States, called for new strategies that can capitalize on young people’s idealism and their commitment to service and voluntarism while addressing their disengagement from political and civic institutions. One of the most promising approaches to increase young people’s informed engagement is school-based civic education. The CIRCLE report identified the following major reasons why schools are ACLAP Final Report & Policy Brief Page 2 important venues for civic education: • It is crucial for the future health of our democracy that all young people, including those who are usually marginalized, be knowledgeable, engaged in their communities and in politics, and committed to the public good. • Encouraging the development of civic skills and attitudes among young people has been an important goal of education and was the primary impetus for originally establishing public schools. • Schools are the only institutions with the capacity and mandate to reach virtually every young person in the country. Of all institutions, schools are the most systematically and directly responsible for imparting citizen norms. • Schools are best equipped to address the cognitive aspects of good citizenship—civic and political knowledge and related skills such as critical thinking and deliberation. • Schools are communities in which young people learn to interact, argue, and work together with others, an important foundation for future citizenship. As a result of the CIRCLE report, the national Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools (CCMS) was launched in 2004, funded by the Carnegie Corp and the Knight Foundation (www.civicmissionofschools.org). The CCMS campaign is working with coalition members and advocates across the political spectrum to dramatically elevate civic learning as an educational priority. The ultimate goal of the campaign is to ensure that schools in the U.S. provide each and every student with a citizenship education that allows them to acquire the skills, knowledge and attitudes that will prepare them to be competent and responsible citizens throughout their lives. Such citizens are those who: • are informed and thoughtful about the history and processes of American democracy and public and community issues and have the ability to obtain information, think critically, and participate in dialogue with others who hold different perspectives; • participate in their communities through organizations working to address cultural, social, political, and religious interests and beliefs; • act politically using the skills, knowledge and commitment needed to accomplish public purposes such as group problem solving, public speaking, petitioning and protesting, and voting; and ACLAP Final Report & Policy Brief Page 3 • have moral and civic virtues such as concern for the rights and welfare of others, social responsibility, tolerance and respect, and belief in their ability to make a difference. As part of the CCMS campaign, competitive grants were awarded to 18 states for projects to advance civic learning. In September 2004, the Alaska Teaching Justice Network (ATJN), a statewide coalition of public, educational, legal, and judicial organizations and individuals dedicated to advancing law-related education in Alaska, secured a small grant from the campaign to conduct the Alaska Civic Learning Assessment (ACLA) Project. The goal of the ACLA Project is to better understand the current state of K-12 civic learning in Alaska and to assess the civic knowledge and experiences of Alaska's youth. The project has focused on both civics topics common across the United States and those unique to Alaska, with the goal of informing efforts to improve civic education in the state. After a brief overview of national research on civic education, this report presents findings from the ACLA Project research on the current status of civic education in Alaska, the civic knowledge of youth and adults, and the attitudes about civic education held by educators, youth and elders.
    • Alaska Coastal Community Youth and the Future

      Lowe, Marie E.; Wilson, Meghan; Robyn, Miller; Sanders, Kate (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-06)
    • Alaska Community Fuel Use

      Saylor, Ben; Wilson, Meghan; Szymoniak, Nick; Fay, Ginny; Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-10)
      The goal of this project was to estimate the amount of fuel used for space heating and electricity production by communities in Alaska. No comprehensive Alaska fuel use data exist at the community level. Community fuel consumption by type of fuel and end use is needed to estimate the potential economic benefits from demand- and supply-side investments in fuel use reduction projects. These investments include weatherization and housing stock improvements; improved lighting, appliance and space heating efficiencies; waste heat capture; electric interties, and alternative energy supply options such as wind and hydroelectric generation. Ultimately the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA) and others can use this information to rank and select a suite of projects that provide the largest gains in fuel reductions at the lowest long-term costs and the highest returns on investment over the life of the projects. Study communities consisted of Power Cost Equalization (PCE) eligible communities. Communities in the North Slope Borough were excluded because fuel subsidies offered by the borough result in different patterns of energy use by households.
    • Alaska Community Jails: Jail Profiles

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-10)
      Highly detailed information derived from billing sheets from 1993–1999 on fifteen community jails (Barrow, Cordova, Craig, Dillingham, Haines, Homer, Bristol Bay Borough, Kodiak, Kotzebue, Petersburg, Seward, Sitka, Unalaska, Valdez and Wrangell). Each jail profile shows the number of admissions by month, time of day and day of the week; the charge category for admission; the gender breakdown for admissions and bedspace utilization; and the duration of detention by specific charges. The overall analysis revealed that while there is regional variation, public order charges, including drug and alcohol-related charges and protective custody holds, were, overall, the most frequent cause for admission.
    • Alaska Correctional Master Plan: Proposed Funding Strategy

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-03-18)
      In 1978, the State of Alaska committed itself to the development of a comprehensive master plan for its correctional system based on a philosophy consistent with the mandate of the Alaska Constitution (Article 1, Section 12): "Penal administration shall be based upon the principle of reformation and upon the need for protecting the public." A fundamental goal of the recommendations of the Alaska Corrections Master Plan is the provision of the most adequate corrections system for Alaska at the least possible cost. The single most effective means of accomplishing this is to avoid unnecessary incarceration of offenders, thereby avoiding the capital cost of constructing new facilities to accommodate growing inmate populations. Avoidance of unnecessary incarceration in turn requires development of a full range of community-based corrections programs, including pre-trial release, probation, pre-release, and parole supervision. This report recommends administrative and statutory changes for a proposed funding strategy.
    • Alaska Correctional Requirements: A Forecast of Prison Population through the Year 2000

      Barnes, Allan R.; McCleary, Richard (School of Justice & School of Engineering, University of Alaska, Anchorage, 1986-01-03)
      The growth of the Alaska prison inmate population over the past fifteen years has been substantial. According to available statistics there were 482 institutionalized adult prisoners under control of the Alaska Division of Corrections in January 1971; by January 1980 this population had increased to 770 inmates; and between 1980 and 1985, the number of Alaska inmates almost tripled, rising from 770 to 2,073. Accurate forecasts of the future size and makeup of the prison population are needed as a basis for long-range programs and capital planning. This report presents long and short-term forecasts of the Alaska incarcerated prisoner population and bedspace needs of the Alaska Department of Corrections through the year 2000. The forecasts were developed by taking into consideration historical facts and status quo assumptions. Attention is also given to the impact of the 1980 Alaska criminal code revision on unsentenced and sentenced populations. The forecast derived from this study provides evidence of the need for additional institutional capacity in Southcentral Alaska by 1990. Planning should proceed for a capacity of 1,000 beds to be available for use by 1990.
    • Alaska Correctional Requirements: A Forecast of Prison Population through the Year 2000 — Executive Summary

      UAA School of Justice (School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-01-03)
      This Executive Summary presents major findings of the full report on the bedspace needs of the Alaska Department of Corrections as projected by the School of Justice through the year 2000. The forecast derived from this study provides evidence of the need for additional institutional capacity in Southcentral Alaska by 1990. Planning should proceed for a capacity of 1,000 beds to be available for use by 1990.
    • Alaska Corrections Master Plan: A Preliminary Draft Summary

      Endell, Roger V. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-07-11)
      In 1978, the State of Alaska committed itself to the development of a comprehensive master plan for its correctional system based on a philosophy consistent with the mandate of the Alaska Constitution (Article 1, Section 12): "Penal administration shall be based unon the principle of reformation and upon the need for protecting the public." This summary of the Alaska Corrections Master Plan was prepared to facilitate an overview of the various sections of the plan prior to the final meeting of the joint Master Plan Advisory Committee. As the plan itself was not yet in final approved form, this summary reflects the plan as it existed prior to finalization.
    • The Alaska Corrections Master Plan: Legislative Implications

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-11-08)
      This paper provides to members of the Alaska State Legislature a summary of those areas of the Alaska Corrections Master Plan which have obvious legislative implications. It includes recommendations for (1) statutory changes, (2) operational funding (personnel), and (3) capital improvements above and beyond the "normal" correctional budgetary process. It is not an all-inclusive narrative summary of the Master Plan. The summary provides page reference numbers to the Master Plan, general topics, and a brief description of the recommendations under the three major topical headings listed above.
    • Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 1: Offenses against the Person

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1977-02)
      The Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 1 is comprised of four articles contained in the Offenses Against the Person chapter of the draft Revised Criminal Code: criminal homicide, assault and related offenses, kidnapping and related offenses; and sexual offenses. Commentary following each article is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include general definitions of terms used throughout the Code, including definitions of the four culpable mental states; derivations of each provision of the Code; existing law that the Code will revise; status of criminal code revision in other U.S. states; and an index to commentary.
    • Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 2: General Principles of Criminal Liability; Parties to a Crime; Attempt; Solicitation; Justification; Robbery; Bribery; Perjury

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1977-02)
      he Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 2, is comprised of seven articles of the draft Revised Criminal Code: general principles of criminal liability; parties to crime; justification; attempt and related offenses (part 1); robbery; bribery and related offenses; and perjury and related offenses. Commentary following each article is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include derivations of each provision of the Code; existing law that the Code will revise; and an index to commentary.
    • Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 3: Offenses against Property

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1977-04)
      The Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 3, is composed of five articles contained in the Offenses Against Property chapter of the draft Revised Criminal Code: theft and related offenses; burglary and criminal trespass; arson, criminal mischief, and related offenses (part 1); forgery and related offenses; and general provisions. Commentary following each article is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include derivations of each provision of the Code; existing law that the Code will revise; and an index to commentary.
    • Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 4: Conspiracy; Criminal Mischief; Business and Commercial Offenses; Escape and Related Offenses; Offenses Relating to Judicial and Other Proceedings; Obstruction of Public Administration; Prostitution; Gambling

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1977-07)
      The Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 4, is composed of nine articles of the Revised Criminal Code: attempt and related offenses (part 2); arson, criminal mischief, and related offenses (part 2); business and commercial offenses; escape and related offenses; offenses relating to judicial and other proceedings; obstruction of public administration; general provisions; prostitution and related offenses; and gambling offenses. Commentary following each article is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include derivations of each provision of the Code and amendments to the gambling provisions of Title 5 of the Alaska Statutes.
    • Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 5: General Provisions; Justification; Responsibility; Bad Checks; Littering; Business and Commercial Offenses; Credit Card Offenses; Offenses against the Family; Abuse of Public Office; Offenses against Public Order; Miscellaneous Offenses; Weapons and Explosives

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1978-01)
      The Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 5, includes the remaining substantive provisions of the draft Revised Criminal Code not covered in prior parts of the tentative draft: articles on general provisions, justification (part 2), and responsibility (mental disease or defect); remaining sections in the Offenses Against Property chapter (issuing a bad check, littering); articles on business and commercial offenses (part 2) and credit card offenses; offenses against the family; the remaining article in the Offenses Against Public Administration chapter (abuse of public office); two Offenses Against Public Order articles (riot, disorderly conduct, and related offenses; and offenses against privacy of communication); weapons and explosives; and miscellaneous offenses. Commentary following each draft statute is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include derivations of each provision of the Code and amendments to provisions contained in the Tentative Draft, Parts 1–3.
    • Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 6: Sentencing: Classification of Offenses Chart; Index to Tentative Draft, Parts 1-6

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1978-02)
      The Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 6, contains an overview of sentencing in existing Alaska law as of 1978 and the provisions on sentencing and related procedures of the draft Revised Criminal Code, including classification of offenses, probation, fines, restitution, community service, imprisonment, and appeals. Commentary following each article is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include definitions, proposed revisions to Title 33 of the Alaska Statutes (parole), a chart of classification of offenses, and an index to the six volumes of the Tentative Draft.