• Bridging Justice Communities: A Professional Workshop Curriculum for Alaska Natives

      University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1998-12)
      Despite the complicated legal and justice questions which present themselves regularly in the life of the Alaska Native community, Native employment in justice system positions — in the bureaucracies and agencies which administer the state and federal justice systems — is low. The program outlined in this document presents a twelve-day to two-week educational workshop for Alaska Native participants focusing on opportunities for careers in the justice system.
    • A Brief Look at Gangs and the Fairbanks Gang Assessment

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-07-01)
      This research overview presents selected information from the 2010 Fairbanks Gang Assessment, along with national data about gang member demographics, gang membership motivation, and problems caused by gangs.
    • A Brief Look at VPSOs and Violence against Women Cases

      UAA Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2011-11)
      This study examined sexual assault and sexual abuse of a minor cases that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and assault cases involving domestic violence that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004. All analyses were restricted to cases that included only one victim and only one adult suspect. From Alaska Department of Law records, we examined whether cases were referred for prosecution, whether cases were accepted for prosecution, and whether cases resulted in a conviction. We also examined if these legal resolutions were different when the first responder was a local paraprofessional police officer (i.e., a Village Public Safety Officer, a Village Police Officer, or a Tribal Police Officer). • Overall, local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability of referral for sexual assault cases, had no effect on the probability of referral for sexual abuse of a minor cases, and decreased the probability of referral for assault cases involving domestic violence. (Cases are referred for prosecution by the Alaska State Troopers to the Alaska Department of Law.) • For all three offenses (sexual assault, sexual abuse of a minor, and assault involving domestic violence), local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability that cases would be accepted for prosecution. • Local paraprofessional police did not impact the probability of conviction in sexual assault cases, but significantly increased the probability of conviction in sexual abuse of minor cases and in assault cases involving domestic violence. Cases that resulted in a conviction may have been plea bargained to reduced charges.
    • Broadband for Rural Development in Southwest Alaska

      Hudson, Heather E. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-03)
    • Broadband Issues and Opportunities for Alaska

      Hudson, Heather E. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-03-28)
    • Broadband Policies for the North: A Comparative Analysis

      Hudson, Heather E. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-11)
    • Budget basics 1975-2021 - Revenues, Agency Operations, and Capital Spending

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/16/2019)
    • Budget options: What are the short term effects? (AK Senate Finance and AK House Finance)

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3/7/2019)
    • Building Evaluation Capacity for Gender-Specific Programming

      Schafer, N. E.; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-10)
      This report provides a basis for future evaluations of gender-specific caseloads in Alaska and provides materials which to help in formulating future programs and evaluations. Three tasks were involved in setting a base for future evaluations of the program: reviewing recent literature on female delinquency and gender-specific programming; developing a local resource manual of services for girls and young women in the Anchorage area; and establishing baseline data on female delinquency in Alaska, with particular focus on female delinquency in Anchorage.
    • Burglary in Alaska: 1985–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-07)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1985–2012 on the property crime of burglary, including burglary rates, time and place of occurrence, and the value of property stolen during burglaries reported to police. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program.
    • Bush Justice and Development in Alaska: Why Legal Process in Village Alaska Has Not Kept up with Changing Social Needs [original paper]

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-02-22)
      This paper analyzes the evolution of the working legal process in the predominantly Alaska Native villages of rural Alaska after Alaska statehood. Replacement of territorial government by highly centralized state justice agencies led to a weakening in the working relationship between formal law and extralegal mechanisms such as the village council. This change coincided with development and other changes which demanded more formal legal presence in villages rather than less. The paper reviews the fate of various bush justice reform efforts made by state agencies and efforts by villages to respond to justice needs. The author suggests that the inadequacy of legal process in village Alaska is not due primarily to language problems or Native confusion about Western law; rather, the "bush justice problem" is caused by a lack of resources, a lack of legal planning for development, and the state governmental system's lack of accountability to its rural constituency. The author recommends experimentation at village level, better planning, and greater autonomy for villages.
    • Bush Justice and Development in Alaska: Why Legal Process in Village Alaska Has Not Kept up with Changing Social Needs [revision]

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-06-28)
      This paper analyzes the evolution of the working legal process in the predominantly Alaska Native villages of rural Alaska after Alaska statehood. Replacement of territorial government by highly centralized state justice agencies led to a weakening in the working relationship between formal law and extralegal mechanisms such as the village council. This change coincided with development and other changes which demanded more formal legal presence in villages rather than less. The paper reviews the fate of various bush justice reform efforts made by state agencies and efforts by villages to respond to justice needs. The author suggests that the inadequacy of legal process in village Alaska is not due primarily to language problems or Native confusion about Western law; rather, the "bush justice problem" is caused by a lack of legal planning for development, the state governmental system's lack of accountability to its rural constituency, and a lack of control by villages over the mixture of formal law, extralegal authority and nonlegal social control appropriate to their needs, both present and future.
    • Business Improvement Recommendation

      Youlo, Walter Y. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The purpose of the ProBrainiac Project Management Plan (PMP) document is to provide the project stakeholders with an approved working guide for how the project will be managed during execution. The PMP outlines how the project work will be managed by the Project Manager (PM), project sponsor throughout the project phases ensuring efficient, timely, execution of the project and deliverable as outlined in the project charter.
    • Bycatch Avoidance Under Amendment 80 in the BSAI Non-Pollock Groundfish Trawl Fishery

      Haynie, Alan; Abbott, Joshua; Reimer, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-05-01)
    • Bylaws of the Selawik Parents Committee

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1985-06)
      These bylaws were drafted on behalf of the Selawik Parent's Committee in the City of Selawik. The Selawik Parent's Committee was formed to work with Selawik children who have broken city or state laws, children in need of aid, and the parents and guardians of such children, seeking to avoid the more extreme remedies of detention (for delinquents) and removal from the home (in cases of children in need of aid) by working out solutions to juvenile and family problems at the village level drawing on the tradition of the elders.
    • Career Exploration in the Anchorage School District

      Daniels, Adele M. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-05)
      Job shadow opportunities for middle and high school students provides valuable exposure to workplace environments as students look at future career choices. This type of career exploration can help to connect students to careers of interest as part of a career pathway. These experiences can help a student recognize the skills that are needed for a particular job, as well as the day-to-day duties for a person working in a given field. Military installations located near local school districts are an untapped resource for the career exploration opportunities that are available. Many military and civilian occupations are very similar in nature, allowing for useful connections to be made by students. Making the connections more simplified, for both partners, could allow for more opportunities to take place. This paper will provide a suggested template to follow when planning an event in any school district located near a military installation.
    • Career Mobility in Criminal Justice: An Exploratory Study of Alaskan Police and Corrections Executives

      Angell, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-03-08)
      This paper provides exploratory research into the career patterns of Alaska police and correctional executives in order to assess career mobility patterns and the variables which may have had a significant influence on success. Basic data for the paper is from biographical descriptions of 78 people who have served during the past ten years in top executive positions of Alaska's police and correctional agencies, including the commissioner of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, police chiefs of the 25 largest municipal police agencies in Alaska, superintendents of Alaska correctional institutions, and directors and assistant directors within the Alaska Division of Corrections.
    • Caregiver Burden and Perceived Health Competence when Caring for Family Members Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia

      Bailes, Christine (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-02-01)
      Purpose: To identify if there is a relationship between perceived health competence and burden of care of informal caregivers of family members with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia (ADRD). Methods: Informal caregivers 18 years and older who received services from the Alzheimer’s Resource of Alaska were invited to complete a survey. Conclusion: Findings indicate that there was a significant negative correlation between Perceived Health Competence and Burden of Care (N = 64, r = -.54, p <.001). Furthermore, the three subscales of the Modified Montgomery-Borgatta Caregiver Burden Scale: Relationship burden (r = -.29, p = .021), Objective burden (r = -.65, p = < .001) and Stress burden (r = -.41, p = .001) indicated that different types of burden affect informal caregivers’ health competence. Implications for practice: Based on the findings of this study, it is important to ensure that informal caregivers do have time for themselves as well as taking care of their own health needs. Nurse Practitioners can play an important role in early detection and prevention, with periodic screening to help identify current needs and to ensure optimal health for these informal caregivers.
    • Case Attrition of Sexual Violence Offenses: Empirical Findings

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This report examined the legal resolutions for 1,184 contact sexual violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and excluded results from other law enforcement agencies. We determined whether cases were founded with an identifiable suspect, were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, were accepted for prosecution, and if the case resulted in a conviction. We only examined whether any conviction on any charge was obtained. In some cases, the conviction may be for a non-sexual offense. * Seventy-five percent of cases were founded with at least one identifiable suspect, 51% of founded cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 60% of referred cases were accepted for prosecution, and 80% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction on at least one charge. The greatest point of attrition was from the founding to the referral decision. * For the most part, cases of Alaska Native victims were as likely, or even more likely, to be processed by the criminal justice system relative to the cases of non-Native victims. * Cases of sexual violence in the most rural portions of Alaska had an equal or greater chance of being subject to legal sanction when compared with cases from Alaska's less rural areas, and were as likely or more likely to receive full enforcement and prosecution. Unfortunately, the percentage of founded cases that resulted in a conviction never exceeded 30%.
    • Case Management Assessment and Course Development

      Patuc, Arlene (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      As health care costs skyrocket, a system of financially responsible health care with a high standard of quality is needed. Case management is a concept conceived over 100 years ago to coordinate care with effective use of services, excellent outcomes and patient satisfaction. This study looked at a needs assessment for a case management/care coordination course at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) by interviewing 10 key informants in the Anchorage area who are actively involved in case management/care coordination or supervision. The participants were enrolled via the snowball method. Assessments of current UAA and online offerings were also conducted looking at present university level offerings in case management/care coordination both at UAA and at universities in the United States. Questions posed to the interviewed participants included the need for a case management/care coordination course, suggested format: graduate school, undergraduate or continuing education and the suggested course content. All participants felt UAA needed a specific course on case management/care coordination. Sixty percent of the participants felt the course should offer continuing education credits, 1 % felt the course would be most effective in graduate school and 4 % felt it would be best utilized as an undergraduate arena. Analysis also found 18 universities with online programs ranging from master degrees to certificates. All participants strongly voiced a need for ongoing information on statewide resources and a need for connections with other case managers/care coordinators.