• Food Security in Alaska: Assisting the Alaska Food Policy Council to Meet Their Strategic Plan Goals Through the Use of GIS Mapping Technology

      Wilson, Melissa N. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-08-01)
      The Alaska Food Policy Council (AFPC) was established to examine how the Alaska food system functions, and to provide ideas and recommendations for improving access to healthy, affordable, culturally appropriate foods for all the state’s citizens. At the start of this project, AFPC did not have a resource tool that allows for the mapping of gaps, projects, initiatives, and strengths of the Alaska food system. Thus, this project focused on developing such a tool to assist AFPC with meeting their strategic plan goals, i.e., promoting the affordability, safety, accessibility and infrastructure of the Alaska food system. Secondary analysis of data relating to AFPC goals was conducted, and associated information was plotted using a GIS mapping tool. The creation of the map introduces a visual tool which can assist in providing an overall picture of the gaps and strengths identified in Alaska’s food system. This project can be used as a starting point for the future development of a real-time web-based GIS map that AFPC and other stakeholders can use to support recommendations to the state on food security related issues.
    • The Foraker Group Report on the Alaska Nonprofit Economy: 2010 Update

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott; Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-11)
      A report on the economic importance of Alaska’s nonprofit sector conducted by the Institute of Social and Economic Research University of Alaska Anchorage
    • Forcible Rapes and Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults — over 62% — the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also.
    • Fostering Professional Quality of Life in Nurses: An Online Curriculum

      Green, Kari (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The nursing profession is based on compassion toward others, with inherent risks and rewards for nurses. The cost of caring is even more prevalent within the context of the current healthcare crisis. Despite implications at the personal, professional, and larger healthcare system level, little effort is being directed toward mitigating these negative effects. The efficacy of self-care and mindfulness practices is promising, yet succinct tools are not readily available. An online curriculum was created to promote awareness, provide evidence-based education, and encourage application of self-care and mindfulness practices for nursing students, practicing nurses, and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to help mitigate the negative effects of compassion fatigue and positively impact professional nursing quality of life. Overall, there was a positive response based on relevance, practicality, and satisfaction from users, as evidenced by responses on a post-completion survey.
    • Fostering Professional Quality of Life in Nurses: An Online Curriculum

      Green, Kari (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The nursing profession is based on compassion toward others, with inherent risks and rewards for nurses. The cost of caring is even more prevalent within the context of the current healthcare crisis. Despite implications at the personal, professional, and larger healthcare system level, little effort is being directed toward mitigating these negative effects. The efficacy of self-care and mindfulness practices is promising, yet succinct tools are not readily available. An online curriculum was created to promote awareness, provide evidence-based education, and encourage application of self-care and mindfulness practices for nursing students, practicing nurses, and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to help mitigate the negative effects of compassion fatigue and positively impact professional nursing quality of life. Overall, there was a positive response based on relevance, practicality, and satisfaction from users, as evidenced by responses on a post-completion survey.
    • Four Scenarios for Alaska's Future

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-05)
      The Alaska economy is growing as high commodity prices (for oil and gold in particular) drive the private sector and oil revenue surpluses fuel the state budget. But as oil production continues to decline; the prospect for commercialization of North Slope gas in the near term fades; access to petroleum resources on federal lands remains stalled; and non-petroleum resource development moves forward only slowly, many Alaskans are concerned with what path the Alaska economy will take in the next decades. We could go in four possible directions. Here we offer a short description of each scenario— general enough to let each person fill in the blanks. Our objective is not to predict but rather to stimulate thought and discussion about what Alaskans can and should do to move the economy along the preferred path. Here’s a summary of the four potential paths. A more detailed description follows.
    • A Framework for a Multi-Year Development Program Targeting High Potential Individuals in the Alaska Oil and Gas Industry

      Loomis, Ryan (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      The Alaska Oil & Gas industry has a limited labor pool which creates a high demand for talented individuals. As a result competition is fierce among the companies in the Alaska's Oil and Gas industry. Furthermore, companies devote considerable resources to recruiting and training talent, only to see individuals leave for a competitor or Alaska altogether; individuals who exhibit potential for leadership are difficult to retain. Individuals with experience in all aspects of Arctic projects, from engineering through operations, are in high demand. Despite this, some of largest employers in Alaska do not have solidified long term programs for developing talent in these areas. There is a need for the contractor companies in Alaska's Oil & Gas industry to develop and implement a plan which would ultimately result in the retention of talented, skilled employees. This project produced a framework which can be utilized by companies to implement competitive multi-year development programs specific to the unique Alaska Oil & Gas contractor industry. The produced framework focused on job movement with aspects of mentorship and applicable higher education. Through use of the this framework, employees would become highly trained and dedicated to their Alaska Oil & Gas employer as they received high quality and diverse experiences while developing long term relationships with mentors dedicated to the success of the participant and Alaska's economy. The primary outcome of framework implementation would be increased retention of high potential individuals. The desired secondary outcomes would be a more knowledgeable workforce and increased cross business collaboration.
    • From Land Rights to Sovereignty: Curious Parallels between Alaskan and Canadian Indigenous Peoples

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-11)
      Alaska Natives and Canadian aboriginal peoples have been late bloomers in securing land claims based on aboriginal title and its extinguishment. While the reasons for this delay relate to the discrete development of Indian policy in each country, both groups now find themselves seeking explicit governmental authority to regulate this domain. Despite the juridical premise that only those groups capable of controlling land have aboriginal claims to cede and/or extinguish, modern groups must secure federal confirmation of their sovereign powers. Barriers in each country are similar; so are the strategies employed.
    • Front Matter

      ANSC (2015-08-20)
    • Fuel Costs, Migration, and Community Viability

      Martin, Stephanie; Killorin, Mary; Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-05)
      ISER researchers compiled and reviewed existing studies and data sources relating to the economic and social viability of remote rural Alaska communities. We particularly looked for possible linkages between high fuel costs and migration. Our review indicates the following: (1) migration from smaller places toward larger places is an ongoing phenomenon that is more noticeable when birth rates drop; (2) there is no systematic empirical evidence that fuel prices, by themselves, have been a definitive cause of migration; (3) the pursuit of economic and educational opportunities appears to be a predominant cause of migration; (4) however, currently available survey data are not sufficient to definitively determine other reasons for migration, which could include concerns about public safety and/or alcohol abuse; 5) most of the survey data pre-date the latest rapid increase (2006-2008) in fuel prices. We suggest several ways that better data could be collected on community viability and the reasons for migration.
    • The Future of Disability in Alaska Summit & Follow-up Survey

      Center for Human Development, University of Alaska Anchorage (Center for Human Development, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12)
      The Future of Disability in Alaska Summit was held in Anchorage in the summer of 2013, May 9-10. The purpose was to gather perspectives from a diverse group of stakeholders to inform a vision of the future for people with disabilities in Alaska in five broad topical areas: 1) Housing Arrangements, 2) Advocacy, 3) Relationships, 4) Economic Wellbeing, and 5) Health. About 76 stakeholders participated in the summit including people with disabilities, family members, advocates, service providers, policymakers, and others. A follow-up online survey was conducted to gather information from a broader range of stakeholders and to get a sense of the highest priorities in each area. The purpose of the report and other products coming out of this effort is to inspire stakeholders to periodically reflect, individually and in groups, on how they are working toward the vision in a relevant area and taking action in the context of advocacy, policy/regulation, funding, and services/resources. The report states a vision for each of the five topical areas and includes many suggested strategies to accomplish it.
    • The Future of the Village Corporation

      Havelock, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1975-12)
      There is an undercurrent of opinion in Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) administration that the village corporation structure established under the Act is an anachronism, unsuitable to the needs of modern corporate enterprise and accordingly Alaska Native purposes. This line of criticism suggests that the regional corporate structure, also established under the Settlement Act, is sufficient to the needs of the Alaska Native people. Organizational issues in the Settlement Act are both politically and emotionally sensitive. As a result, discussion of this point of view has been muted. It is nonetheless important. The purpose of this paper is to search out the purposes of village corporation existence as a foundation to change or for a better understanding of the roles that are played by them. The Act serves as a written constitution for the Alaska Native people. It must be interpreted broadly to accomplish these fundamental purposes of the people and not as an instrument of a particular economic theory – which is, at least in part, alien to its heritage.
    • FY 1994 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Curtis, Richard W.; Atwell, Cassie; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1995-09)
      This report marks Alaska's transition from calendar year to fiscal year reporting of compliance with the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA). JJDPA mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. No instances of a status offender held in secure detention was recorded in FY94, as compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of 1976. 17 separation violations were recorded in FY94, representing a 98% reduction from the 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 53 jail removal violations were projected, representing a 94% reduction from the 1980 baseline and an 10% decrease from calendar year 1993.
    • FY 1995 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Curtis, Richard W.; Atwell, Cassie; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-06)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 13 instances of a status offender held in secure detention were recorded in FY 1995, compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of CY 1976. 11 separation violations were recorded and 23 projected in FY 1995, representing a 97.3% reduction from the CY 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 143 jail removal violations were projected, representing an 83% reduction from the CY 1980 baseline. Originally completed Feb 1996; revised June 1996.
    • FY 1996 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Curtis, Richard W.; Atwell, Cassie; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-12)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 4 instances of a status offender held in secure detention were recorded in FY 1996, compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of CY 1976. 3 separation violations were recorded in FY 1997, representing a 99.6% reduction from the CY 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 44 jail removal violations were projected, representing an 95% reduction from the CY 1980 baseline.
    • FY 1997 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Curtis, Richard W.; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-12)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 1 instance of a status offender held in secure detention was recorded in FY 1997, compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of CY 1976. 2 separation violations were recorded in FY 1997, representing a 99.8% reduction from the CY 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 68 jail removal violations were projected (52 actual), representing an 92% reduction from the CY 1980 baseline. Originally completed December 1997; revised July 1999.
    • FY 1998 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Atwell, Cassie; Schafer, N. E.; Connor, Kelley (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-01)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 3 instances of status offenders held in secure detention were recorded in FY 1998, compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of CY 1976. 2 separation violations were recorded in FY 1998, representing a 99.8% reduction from the CY 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 57 jail removal violations were projected (52 (actual), representing an 93% reduction from the CY 1980 baseline.
    • FY 1999 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Atwell, Cassie; Schafer, N. E.; Werre, Jason (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-04-24)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 12 instances of status offenders held in secure detention were recorded in FY 1999, compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of CY 1976. No separation violations were recorded in FY 1999, representing a 100% reduction from the CY 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 69 jail removal violations were projected (56 actual), representing an substantial reduction from the CY 1980 baseline. Originally completed March 2000; revised April 2000.
    • FY 2000 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act Compliance Monitoring Report

      Atwell, Cassie; Schafer, N. E.; Lepine, Brian; Curtis, Richard W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-03)
      The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) mandates removal of status offenders and nonoffenders from secure detention and correctional facilities, sight and sound separation of juveniles and adults, and removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. In Alaska, 2 instances of status offenders held in secure detention were recorded in FY 2000, compared with 485 violations in the baseline year of CY 1976. In Alaska, 17 separation violations were recorded in FY 2000 (45 projected), representing a 98% reduction from the CY 1976 baseline of 824 violations. 82 jail removal violations were projected (50 actual), representing an substantial reduction from the CY 1980 baseline.
    • General Communication, Inc. Project Management Office Reporting for Results Project

      Neill, Donna (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-01)
      General Communication Incorporated (GCI) is a project-driven company. As the PMO is established there is a need to document current reporting practices and improve the organizations project management maturity level by standardizing the reporting process and methodology, and determining the foundation to practice continuous improvement within the program management group. Research is needed to document an effective reporting system and implement improvements to the current reporting system with input from GCI team members. The goal of this project is to develop an effective reporting guide that documents current reporting templates and practices, and considers best practices and project management maturity for areas of improvements and more effective reporting.