• Fire Island Public Opinion Survey: Summary of Findings

      Barnes, Allan R. (School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-12-04)
      Under the terms of a contract between the Alaska Department of Corrections and the University of Alaska, Anchorage, to determine the feasibility of placing a prison on Fire Island, the UAA School of Justice in November 1986 conducted a public opinion telephone survey of a random sample of one thousand residents of the Municipality of Anchorage and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. Results indicated that respondents favored spending money to prevent and deter crime rather than to punish prisoners or to build additional prisons. When informed about the increased cost of construction and operation of a prison on Fire Island in comparison with other potential sites in Southcentral Alaska, they did not favor building a prison on Fire Island. However, in deciding the appropriate location for a new prison, cost of construction was not deemed as important as either the impact of the prison on the local economy or the costs associated with everyday operations and programs of the new prison.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1980-2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-01-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the prevalence of murder in the U.S. and Alaska from 1980 to 2011, as well as data on the use of firearms in murders (both for the U.S. as a whole, and Alaska), aggravated assaults (Alaska only), and robberies (Alaska only) over the same period.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1985-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the use of firearms in the commission of three violent crimes — homicide (murder and nonnegligent homicide), robbery, and aggravated assault — in the U.S. and Alaska from 1985 to 2012. Data on the use of knives and other cutting instruments, strong-arm tactics, and other weapons in the commission of these crimes are also presented.
    • The First 50 Years and the Next: ISER and Rural Alaska

      Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-03)
      Since 1961… ISER has been enhancing “the well-being of Alaskans and others, through nonpartisan research that helps people understand social and economic systems and supports informed public and private decision-making.” (ISER Mission Statement)
    • Fiscal Impacts of Alternative Land Use Scenarios for the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04-29)
      This paper presents the projected fiscal impacts on Alaska’s Matanuska-Susitna Borough (MSB) and its taxpayers, through year 2050, of six alternative land use and population scenarios. The analysis is focused on population growth and education spending, due to the overwhelming importance of school expenditures in overall borough finances. The Mat-Su Borough is Alaska’s fastest growing borough. Between 2000 and 2012, MSB population grew by 3.8% per year, from about 60,000 to about 94,000. Also, real1 total school expenditures per student (both operating plus capital) increased by 1.6% per year between 2003 and 2012. The State of Alaska currently pays 71% of these total education costs.2 With Alaska oil production decreasing, state education spending per student is likely to decline. Population growth could therefore be costly to MSB residents if school and other costs increase faster than available financial resources.
    • Fisheries Law and Enforcement

      Havelock, John E.; Barber, Joe; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-09)
      This text provides a general introduction to the laws, agencies, and issues involved in fisheries regulation, particularly in Alaska, originally intended for an introductory course on regulation as part of an extensive curriculum in fisheries at Kodiak Community College, University of Alaska. The text covers international, federal, and Alaska fisheries law through 1982; the history of fisheries and fisheries law in Alaska; federal, Alaska, and local agencies which affect fisheries; and the justice system, law enforcement practice, and individual rights within the maritime context.
    • Fisheries Production: Management Institutions, Spatial Choice, and the Quest for Policy Invariance

      Reimer, Matthew; Abbott, Joshua; Wilen, James (University of Chicago Press Journals, 2017-04-01)
      The fishery-dependent data used to estimate fishing production technologies are shaped by the incentive structures that influence fishermen’s purposeful choices across their multiple margins of production. Using a combination of analytical and simulation methods, we demonstrate how market prices and regulatory institutions influence a dominant short-run margin of production—the deployment of fishing time over space. We show that institutionally driven spatial selection leads to only a partial exploration of the full production set, yielding poorly identified estimates of production possibilities outside of the institutionally dependent status quo. The implication is that many estimated fisheries production functions suffer from a lack of policy invariance and may yield misleading predictions for even the most short-run of policy evaluation tasks. Our findings suggest that accurate assessment of the impacts of a policy intervention requires a description of the fishing production process that is sufficiently structural so as to be invariant to institutional changes.
    • Fitness AK: Applying the project management tools and principles to a business plan

      Hermon, Erik (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      Fitness Alaska is a business opportunity centering on creating a fitness center near Palmer, AK in order to capitalize on growing demand for health and wellness. This project will focus on the creation of a business plan and document the research necessary to plan and predict the costs associated with opening a fitness center. The business will be concentrated on a medium space concept (7000-10000 sq/ft) based around cardiovascular and resistance circuit training, personal training, and a shake bar for members. The purpose of this project was to apply project management principles to create a business plan and assess the feasibility for a fitness center near Palmer, AK. Project Management lent a vital amount of structure to a process that was unfamiliar to the researcher, allowing work to be broken into logical portions and completed within a constrained time period. The Palmer surrounding area population grew by 14.3% between 2010 and 2015 and projects to continue. The market favorability and the gap in services for a medium sized fitness center in the Palmer area have created an opportunity to be filled. This project details the business case analysis of the Palmer area to make recommendations for such a business.
    • Food Security in Alaska: Assisting the Alaska Food Policy Council to Meet Their Strategic Plan Goals Through the Use of GIS Mapping Technology

      Wilson, Melissa N. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-08-01)
      The Alaska Food Policy Council (AFPC) was established to examine how the Alaska food system functions, and to provide ideas and recommendations for improving access to healthy, affordable, culturally appropriate foods for all the state’s citizens. At the start of this project, AFPC did not have a resource tool that allows for the mapping of gaps, projects, initiatives, and strengths of the Alaska food system. Thus, this project focused on developing such a tool to assist AFPC with meeting their strategic plan goals, i.e., promoting the affordability, safety, accessibility and infrastructure of the Alaska food system. Secondary analysis of data relating to AFPC goals was conducted, and associated information was plotted using a GIS mapping tool. The creation of the map introduces a visual tool which can assist in providing an overall picture of the gaps and strengths identified in Alaska’s food system. This project can be used as a starting point for the future development of a real-time web-based GIS map that AFPC and other stakeholders can use to support recommendations to the state on food security related issues.
    • The Foraker Group Report on the Alaska Nonprofit Economy: 2010 Update

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott; Schwörer, Tobias (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-11)
      A report on the economic importance of Alaska’s nonprofit sector conducted by the Institute of Social and Economic Research University of Alaska Anchorage
    • Forcible Rapes and Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults — over 62% — the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also.
    • Fostering Professional Quality of Life in Nurses: An Online Curriculum

      Green, Kari (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The nursing profession is based on compassion toward others, with inherent risks and rewards for nurses. The cost of caring is even more prevalent within the context of the current healthcare crisis. Despite implications at the personal, professional, and larger healthcare system level, little effort is being directed toward mitigating these negative effects. The efficacy of self-care and mindfulness practices is promising, yet succinct tools are not readily available. An online curriculum was created to promote awareness, provide evidence-based education, and encourage application of self-care and mindfulness practices for nursing students, practicing nurses, and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to help mitigate the negative effects of compassion fatigue and positively impact professional nursing quality of life. Overall, there was a positive response based on relevance, practicality, and satisfaction from users, as evidenced by responses on a post-completion survey.
    • Fostering Professional Quality of Life in Nurses: An Online Curriculum

      Green, Kari (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      The nursing profession is based on compassion toward others, with inherent risks and rewards for nurses. The cost of caring is even more prevalent within the context of the current healthcare crisis. Despite implications at the personal, professional, and larger healthcare system level, little effort is being directed toward mitigating these negative effects. The efficacy of self-care and mindfulness practices is promising, yet succinct tools are not readily available. An online curriculum was created to promote awareness, provide evidence-based education, and encourage application of self-care and mindfulness practices for nursing students, practicing nurses, and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to help mitigate the negative effects of compassion fatigue and positively impact professional nursing quality of life. Overall, there was a positive response based on relevance, practicality, and satisfaction from users, as evidenced by responses on a post-completion survey.
    • Four Scenarios for Alaska's Future

      Goldsmith, Oliver Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-05)
      The Alaska economy is growing as high commodity prices (for oil and gold in particular) drive the private sector and oil revenue surpluses fuel the state budget. But as oil production continues to decline; the prospect for commercialization of North Slope gas in the near term fades; access to petroleum resources on federal lands remains stalled; and non-petroleum resource development moves forward only slowly, many Alaskans are concerned with what path the Alaska economy will take in the next decades. We could go in four possible directions. Here we offer a short description of each scenario— general enough to let each person fill in the blanks. Our objective is not to predict but rather to stimulate thought and discussion about what Alaskans can and should do to move the economy along the preferred path. Here’s a summary of the four potential paths. A more detailed description follows.
    • A Framework for a Multi-Year Development Program Targeting High Potential Individuals in the Alaska Oil and Gas Industry

      Loomis, Ryan (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      The Alaska Oil & Gas industry has a limited labor pool which creates a high demand for talented individuals. As a result competition is fierce among the companies in the Alaska's Oil and Gas industry. Furthermore, companies devote considerable resources to recruiting and training talent, only to see individuals leave for a competitor or Alaska altogether; individuals who exhibit potential for leadership are difficult to retain. Individuals with experience in all aspects of Arctic projects, from engineering through operations, are in high demand. Despite this, some of largest employers in Alaska do not have solidified long term programs for developing talent in these areas. There is a need for the contractor companies in Alaska's Oil & Gas industry to develop and implement a plan which would ultimately result in the retention of talented, skilled employees. This project produced a framework which can be utilized by companies to implement competitive multi-year development programs specific to the unique Alaska Oil & Gas contractor industry. The produced framework focused on job movement with aspects of mentorship and applicable higher education. Through use of the this framework, employees would become highly trained and dedicated to their Alaska Oil & Gas employer as they received high quality and diverse experiences while developing long term relationships with mentors dedicated to the success of the participant and Alaska's economy. The primary outcome of framework implementation would be increased retention of high potential individuals. The desired secondary outcomes would be a more knowledgeable workforce and increased cross business collaboration.
    • A Framework for Culturally Relevant Online Learning: Lessons from Alaska's Tribal Health Workers.

      Cueva, Katie; Cueva, Melany; Revels, Laura; Lanier, Anne P; Dignan, Mark; Viswanath, K; Fung, Teresa T; Geller, Alan C (2019-08)
      Culturally relevant health promotion is an opportunity to reduce health inequities in diseases with modifiable risks, such as cancer. Alaska Native people bear a disproportionate cancer burden, and Alaska's rural tribal health workers consequently requested cancer education accessible online. In response, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium cancer education team sought to create a framework for culturally relevant online learning to inform the creation of distance-delivered cancer education. Guided by the principles of community-based participatory action research and grounded in empowerment theory, the project team conducted a focus group with 10 Alaska Native education experts, 12 culturally diverse key informant interviews, a key stakeholder survey of 62 Alaska Native tribal health workers and their instructors/supervisors, and a literature review on distance-delivered education with Alaska Native or American Indian people. Qualitative findings were analyzed in Atlas.ti, with common themes presented in this article as a framework for culturally relevant online education. This proposed framework includes four principles: collaborative development, interactive content delivery, contextualizing learning, and creating connection. As an Alaskan tribal health worker shared "we're all in this together. All about conversations, relationships. Always learn from you/with you, together what we know and understand from the center of our experience, our ways of knowing, being, caring." The proposed framework has been applied to support cancer education and promote cancer control with Alaska Native people and has motivated health behavior change to reduce cancer risk. This framework may be adaptable to other populations to guide effective and culturally relevant online interventions.
    • From Land Rights to Sovereignty: Curious Parallels between Alaskan and Canadian Indigenous Peoples

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-11)
      Alaska Natives and Canadian aboriginal peoples have been late bloomers in securing land claims based on aboriginal title and its extinguishment. While the reasons for this delay relate to the discrete development of Indian policy in each country, both groups now find themselves seeking explicit governmental authority to regulate this domain. Despite the juridical premise that only those groups capable of controlling land have aboriginal claims to cede and/or extinguish, modern groups must secure federal confirmation of their sovereign powers. Barriers in each country are similar; so are the strategies employed.
    • From Pine Ridge to Alaska Native Villages

      Berg, Paul (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2016-08-06)
      In his memoir, Sandra's Hands, a Reflective Journey from the Vietnam War to the Siege of Wounded Knee, Paul Berg explores his experiences in the Vietnam War and working as a teacher on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. After 1973, when tensions on the reservation exploded and culminated in the 72 day siege of the village of Wounded Knee, Paul Berg finds himself drawn into the conflict as he strives to provide quality education to his students. After this experience and given his dedication to education, he becomes a recognized national expert in cross-cultural education and establishes, with Bill Demmert and Richard Dauenhauer, the first cross-cultural education course required for teacher education in Alaska.
    • From the Beverly Hillbillies to Duck Dynasty: Whiteness, Culture, and Memory in the American South.

      Hartman, Ian C. (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2014-04-07)
      At this event, professor Ian Hartman (UAA History Dept.) discusses how white racial identity in the America South has shaped public policy and popular culture throughout America. His research has been published in American Nineteenth Century History and in The Journal of Southern History. Currently, he is working on a book about race, labor, and economic development in the American west since the Civil War.
    • From Verse to Free Verse, Alaska Poetry from 1867 until 1966.

      Sexton, Tom (University of Alaska Anchorage. Bookstore, 2018-08-02)
      At this event, poet Tom Sexton presents part two of his talk on a brief history of Alaska poetry from 1867-1966. Part one was recorded on October 24, 2017 at the UAA Campus Bookstore. Poet Tom Sexton is a Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Alaska Anchorage and was Alaska's Poet Laureate from 1994 until 2000. He is the author of several collections of poetry including For the Sake of the Light and I Think Again of Those Ancient Chinese Poets, both from University of Alaska Press.