• Alaska Correctional Requirements: A Forecast of Prison Population through the Year 2000

      Barnes, Allan R.; McCleary, Richard (School of Justice & School of Engineering, University of Alaska, Anchorage, 1986-01-03)
      The growth of the Alaska prison inmate population over the past fifteen years has been substantial. According to available statistics there were 482 institutionalized adult prisoners under control of the Alaska Division of Corrections in January 1971; by January 1980 this population had increased to 770 inmates; and between 1980 and 1985, the number of Alaska inmates almost tripled, rising from 770 to 2,073. Accurate forecasts of the future size and makeup of the prison population are needed as a basis for long-range programs and capital planning. This report presents long and short-term forecasts of the Alaska incarcerated prisoner population and bedspace needs of the Alaska Department of Corrections through the year 2000. The forecasts were developed by taking into consideration historical facts and status quo assumptions. Attention is also given to the impact of the 1980 Alaska criminal code revision on unsentenced and sentenced populations. The forecast derived from this study provides evidence of the need for additional institutional capacity in Southcentral Alaska by 1990. Planning should proceed for a capacity of 1,000 beds to be available for use by 1990.
    • Alaska Criminal Statute Conversion Tables for Use with Alaska Criminal Statute Reference Guide and the Alaska OBTS Database

      Barnes, Allan R.; Watson, Julie R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-11)
      These conversion tables are designed for use with the Alaska Offender-Based Transaction Statistics (OBTS) database and the Alaska Criminal Statute Cross-Reference Guide. The purpose of the tables is to allow users of printed versions of the "Guide" to quickly convert Alaska Statutes to their corresponding National Criminal Information Center (NCIC), Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), Alaska OBTS, and Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) codes. (The tables are not required for use with the computerized version of the Guide.) The tables reflect legislative changes in Alaska Statutes through 1997, but are no longer updated.
    • Alaska Criminal Statute Cross-Reference Guide

      Barnes, Allan R.; Watson, Julie R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-11)
      This guide provides cross-references between Alaska criminal statutes and National Criminal Information Center (NCIC), Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), Alaska OBTS, and Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) codes. The guide also includes brief annotations of each statute. The guide is also available in a computerized version. An accompanying volume, Conversion Tables for Use with the Alaska OBTS Database and the Alaska Criminal Statute Cross-Reference Guide, is designed for use with printed versions of the guide. The guide reflects legislative changes in Alaska Statutes through 1997, but is no longer updated.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 5, No. 4 (Winter 1989)

      Parry, David L.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Barnes, Allan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-01)
      The Winter 1989 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents the first of two articles analyzing Alaska crime trends from 1963 to 1987 based on Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) data and additional data compiled by the Alaska State Troopers, this article analyzes statewide crime trends from 1963 to 1987. The the National Crime Survey questionnaire has added expanded questions which permit analysis of crime victims' perception of drug and alcohol use by violent offenders; protective actions taken by victims and bystanders; and the response of police and other criminal justice authorities to reported crimes. A study of 1984 Alaska felony cases used 1984 Alaska Offender-Based Transaction Statistics (OBTS) to analyze the process of case attrition and charge change between arrest and initial prosecution. January 1989 population figures for Alaska Department of Corrections facilities are presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 8, No. 2 (Summer 1991)

      Marenin, Otwin; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Barnes, Allan R.; Criminal Justice Statistics Association (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-06-01)
      The Summer 1991 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents data from a study of crime in five unnamed Athabascan villages in central Alaska from 1985 through 1990; extracts from Village Public Safety Officer and Alaska State Trooper reports provide concrete details of individual incidents and a sense of context. The Offender-Based Transaction Statistics (OBTS) program of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which tracks adult offenders from the point of entry into the criminal justice system through final disposition; OBTS data from eight U.S. states, including Alaska, indicate that for every 100 persons arrested for a felony in 1988, 81 were prosecuted, 59 were convicted, 39 were sentenced to incarceration, and 10 were committed to a state prison, usually for more than a year. Key provisions of the federal Violent Crime Control Act of 1991, awaiting final passage, are described.
    • Brady Statute Data: Adjudicated Mental Defectives and Involuntary Mental Commitments

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09-08)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the first of four reports on these categories, describes how adjudicated mental defectives and involuntary mental commitments can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The report discussed federal statutory definitions of the terms adjudicated as a mental defective, committed to a mental institution, and legal authority; compares these terms with those current in Alaska Statues and used by social service and mental health agencies in the state; and describes, in general, data held by federal, state, local, and private agencies in Alaska. At present, there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either of the two categories with any accuracy: besides technical difficulties in getting different databases to "talk" to each other, records are not kept on mentally ill individuals, and even if they were, access would be prohibited in the face of federal and state laws regarding privacy.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibits the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. These reports describe potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, illegal aliens, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, are the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety—Executive Summary

      Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Atwell, Cassie (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibited the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. This executive report summarizes study findings on potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, noncitizens in the U.S. illegally or unlawfully, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and briefly discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, were the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Illegally or Unlawfully in the United States

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the fourth of four reports on these categories, describes how undocumented immigrants who are unlawfully in the United States can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. It was found that the most feasibile means for obtaining information for the purposes of Brady background checks would be the Verification Information System (VIS) of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). However, project researchers received no response from INS to inquiries about requirements of access to VIS.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who are Subject to a Court Order Restraining Them from Threatening or Committing Acts of Domestic Violence or Abuse

      Atwell, Cassie; Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-03-06)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the second of four reports on these categories, describes how persons subject to a domestic violence restraining order can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The state is rapidly moving to the point where all individuals who meet the Brady definition for this category will be identified, the information housed in a separate database, and reported to federal agencies. AS 18.65.540 provides for a central registry of Domestic Violence Protective Orders, a product of the (state) Domestic Violence Prevention and Victim Protection Act of 1996.
    • Fire Island Public Opinion Survey: Summary of Findings

      Barnes, Allan R. (School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-12-04)
      Under the terms of a contract between the Alaska Department of Corrections and the University of Alaska, Anchorage, to determine the feasibility of placing a prison on Fire Island, the UAA School of Justice in November 1986 conducted a public opinion telephone survey of a random sample of one thousand residents of the Municipality of Anchorage and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. Results indicated that respondents favored spending money to prevent and deter crime rather than to punish prisoners or to build additional prisons. When informed about the increased cost of construction and operation of a prison on Fire Island in comparison with other potential sites in Southcentral Alaska, they did not favor building a prison on Fire Island. However, in deciding the appropriate location for a new prison, cost of construction was not deemed as important as either the impact of the prison on the local economy or the costs associated with everyday operations and programs of the new prison.
    • Preliminary Results From the Long-Term Inmate Survey: Focus on Child Abuse Histories

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Barnes, Allan R.; Curtis, Richard (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1998-04-21)
      This preliminary report of long-term inmates in Alaska correctional facilities finds that over 80 percent of long-term inmates report having been physically abused as children, over 65 percent report having suffered neglect. Other findings related to the child abuse histories of long-term inmates are also reported.
    • Prison Anger Reduction Programs Evaluation Development Project

      Schafer, N. E.; Barnes, Allan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1985-07-31)
      This report describes efforts to develop Alaska-specific norms for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), using the Megargee offender classification system, for use in program evaluations in Alaska correctional facilities, specifically for evaluation of three pilot anger reduction programs initiated at Alaska Department of Corrections institutions in late 1984/early 1985: (1) Women in Crisis (at Fairbanks Correctional Center); (2) M. E. N., Inc. (at Lemon Creek Correctional Center, Juneau); (3) Bering Sea Women's Group (at Nome Correctional Center). The report provides assessments of the three programs and the correctional centers where they were held and makes recommendations for completing the development of Alaska-specific MMPI-based norms and for the administration of the MMPI as pre- and post-test for measuring psychological changes — particularly in hostility/frustration levels — in participants in anger reduction programs.
    • Results From the Long-Term Inmate Survey: Focus on Child Abuse Histories

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Barnes, Allan R.; Curtis, Richard (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1998-06)
      This report of long-term inmates in Alaska correctional facilities attempts to describe the childhood experiences of a sample of long-term inmates, address the "cycle of abuse" issue; and present the correlates of abuse which may impact the pattern of offending or inmate functioning. Over 80 percent of long-term inmates report having been physically abused as children; over 65 percent report having suffered neglect.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Program: Initial Recidivism Study

      Mander, Anthony M.; Atrops, Martin E.; Barnes, Allan R.; Munafo, Roseanne (Offender Programs, Alaska Department of Corrections; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-07-31)
      This report presents results of a recidivism study of participants in the Sex Offender Treatment Program at Hiland Mountain Correctional Center, Alaska Department of Corrections, from January 1987 to August 1995. The report provides an overview and history of sex offender treatment in Alaska as well as a literature review of other studies and findings on this area of treatment. The Alaska study, which was the first conducted of the treatment program, found that any level of treatment achieved resulted in less recidivism, with the longer the period of treatment, the lower the recidivism. The study also noted the high percentage of Alaska Natives in the program and the history of alcohol and substance abuse presented by many sex offenders. The majority of offenders in the program were guilty of assaulting children. The study discusses the program's cost benefits as well as the implications of its findings for probation and parole.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Project: Literature Review

      Barnes, Allan R.; Baca, Melanie; Dix, Melody; Flahr, Shelly; Gaal, Cathy; Whitaker, Max; Moeglein, Samantha; Morgheim, Nicol (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1994-07-22)
      A comprehensive literature review on recidivism by and the treatment of sex offenders.