• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 25, No. 3 (Fall 2008)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Everett, Ronald S.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-09-01)
      The Fall 2008 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum reports on assaults in domestic violence incidents in Alaska communities served primarily by the Alaska State Troopers; the trajectories of juvenile delinquency careers among youth in Anchorage and Fairbanks; and results of a community survey of residents of Northeast Anchorage on public safety and community satisfaction.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 1 (Spring 2009)

      Everett, Ronald S.; Carns, Teresa W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-03-01)
      The Spring 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on Anchorage Wellness Court and other therapeutic jurisprudence and problem-solving courts, justice system operating expenditures, and an update on the work of the Criminal Justice Working Group.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 27, No. 1 (Spring 2010)

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald S.; Chamard, Sharon; Armstrong, Barbara; Carns, Teresa White (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-03-01)
      The Spring 2010 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on juvenile sex offenders, housing for chronic inebriates, justice projects in Alaska funded through Recovery Act funds, and the Alaska Prisoner Re-entry Task Force.
    • Final Report: Anchorage Disproportionate Minority Contact Study

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald S.; Hurr, William (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2010-10-01)
      This project examined disproportionate minority contact in Anchorage, Alaska. It was designed to provide a more nuanced understanding of disproportionate minority contact at the referral stage (when law enforcement officers refer youth to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice). To do so, we relied on community involvement and utilized different statistical techniques to examine the geography and development of disproportionate minority contact. Researchers partnered with practitioners from the Anchorage Disproportionate Minority Contact Initiative to structure the research process and to interpret and disseminate results. Geographic analyses were conducted to examine where the highest levels of disproportionate minority contact were occurring and longitudinal analyses were conducted to examine at what age disproportionate minority contact began. These analyses provided an understanding of disproportionate minority contact that was obscured when examining relative rate indices. Geographic analyses, for example, revealed high levels of disproportionate minority contact for Pacific youth (a group that would have traditionally been ignored because of its ‘small population’). Longitudinal analyses revealed that disproportionate minority contact began at age 13. Although relative rate indices are useful to identify broad patterns in disproportionate minority contact, they are less useful to drive action. We overcame this limitation with strong community partnerships and different statistical methods for disproportionate minority contact research. In the end, practitioners and researchers used data and research to develop strategic plans to reduce disproportionate minority contact.
    • Quantitative Analysis of Disparities in Juvenile Delinquency Referrals

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald S. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2006-09-01)
      Minority youths in Anchorage are referred to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) for delinquent behavior at rates much higher than white youths. This report, presenting the first findings from an extended examination of extended examination of race, ethnicity, and juvenile justice in Anchorage, provides a broad overview of the level of disproportionate minority contact in the Alaska juvenile justice system and examines whether disproportionate minority contact occurs (1) for all minority youth, (2) for both males and females, (3) for both youth referred for new crimes and youth referred for conduct or probation violations, and (4) throughout the Municipality of Anchorage or in specific geographical areas within the Municipality of Anchorage. By developing a detailed understanding of the scope of disproportionate minority contact, we become much better prepared to identify its causes and to develop promising evidence-based solutions. The sample in this analysis includes 1,936 youths who resided in Anchorage and were referred to DJJ in Anchorage during fiscal year 2005 for new crimes, probation violations, or conduct violations.