• Male Urinary Incontinence: A Critical Appraisal of the Literature With Practice Recommendations

      Forcht, Deborah J. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      Urinary Incontinence (UI) is a debilitating medical condition that affects individuals’ quality of life. People with this condition describe decreased enjoyment of sexual activity, as well as increased risk of experiencing depression, and anxiety. Data show that incontinence is less prevalent in men than women, which may explain the dearth of studies focusing specifically on men. As men age, their rate of suffering from UI increases from 4.8% at ages 19 to 44 to over 21% by the age of 65 years. Additionally, men who suffer from permanent UI are more likely to be institutionalized compared to those without UI and have increased risk for suicide, infections, falls, social isolation, loss of independence and may suffer from life-altering fractures. For many patients, UI may be reversible with medical intervention. A critical appraisal of UI literature found many non-surgical male UI treatments that were effective. The evidence-based information was utilized to provide primary care providers with up to date male-specific interventions for UI.