• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 1 (Spring 2000)

      Giblin, Matthew; Atwell, Cassie (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-03-01)
      The Spring 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on drugs and drug abuse, with articles on drug use among Anchorage arrestees, sources of data on illicit drug use, the national drug control budget, drug cases in federal and Alaska courts, substance abuse treatment programs in Alaska correctional institutions, and the increase in correctional populations due to the “war on drugs.”
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 3 (Fall 2000)

      Giblin, Matthew; Morrow, Phyllis; Riley, John (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-09-01)
      The Fall 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on the Anchorage Coordinated Agency Network (CANS) program, designed to enhance supervision and services provided to juvenile probationers; continuing efforts in the Alaska judicial system to improve access to justice in cases involving speakers of language other than English; and a review essay on the book “Newjack,” which describes how the prison experience influences the lives and relationships of correctional officers. The Justice Center celebrates its 25th year as a research, academic, and public education institution.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 18, No. 3 (Fall 2001)

      Giblin, Matthew; Moras, Antonia; Fishback, Steve (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-09-01)
      The Fall 2001 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on drug use among Anchorage arrestees in 2000, a review essay on a recent book on South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the design of the new Anchorage jail, which replaces the old Sixth Avenue Jail.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 19, No. 4 (Winter 2003)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Giblin, Matthew; Riley, John (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-01-01)
      The Winter 2003 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) on drug use trends and alcohol use among Anchorage arrestees, ADAM in an international context, other measures of drug use, findings from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey on fear of crime and quality of life in Anchorage, and a review essay on a recent book about mass incarceration.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 20, No. 2 (Summer 2003)

      Giblin, Matthew; Bronen, Robin (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-06-01)
      The Summer 2003 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on findings from a survey of adult victims of crime in Anchorage, figures on correctional populations in Alaska and nationally, and visa protections for immigrant victims of crime.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 20, No. 3 (Fall 2003)

      Giblin, Matthew; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-09-01)
      The Fall 2003 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on public satisfaction in Anchorage related to public services and policing, with articles on results of a survey of Anchorage residents in relation to police performance, emergency medical services, public transportation, snow removal and schools; and further information on public satisfaction with Anchorage police derived from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey.
    • Drug and Alcohol-Related Workload of Anchorage Patrol Officers: Results From Two Patrol Officer Surveys

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Giblin, Matthew; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-01-01)
      It is widely agreed among criminal justice professionals that alcohol and illegal drugs play a role in patterns of crime, but not much is known about how these substances influence the operation of criminal justice agencies, particularly in the area of policing. This report summarizes the findings of a study of the extent to which drug and alcohol-related incidents formed the workload of Anchorage Police Department patrol officers. The study consisted of two surveys, the first of which asked APD patrol officers to provide their best estimate of the amount of time they spent dealing with alcohol and drug-related activities, the second of which required patrol officers to complete incident logs describing drug and alcohol-related incidents encountered on patrol. The study found that officers tended to overestimate the amount of time they spent on drug or alcohol-related activities, but that the drug and alcohol-related activities nonetheless comprise a significant portion of APD patrol officers' workload.
    • Evaluation of the Anchorage Coordinated Agency Network (CANS) Program

      Giblin, Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2000-10-02)
      In spring 1999, the Anchorage Police Department and the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice formed a partnership to enhance the supervision and services provided to juvenile probationers in Anchorage. Modeled after a successful program in San Diego, California, the Anchorage Coordinated Agency Network (CANS) project extended the supervision arm of the youth probation office by having Anchorage police officers make random visits to juvenile probationers. This evaluation examines the CANS program during its pilot phase, June through December 1999. The evaluation assesses whether juveniles participating in the CANS program differed from a control group of non-CANS participants with respect to new probation violations and new offenses. An effort is also made to determine the most important factors predicting program outcomes.
    • Measuring Adult Criminal Victimization: Findings from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey

      Giblin, Matthew; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-07)
      Since 1973, the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) has been administered annually to a national sample of households. The survey captures unreported or underreported criminal events that are not available using official crime data such as the Uniform Crime Reports. However, the data collected are most useful in identifying crime trends nationwide. The national scope of the survey makes it impossible to extract crime data for smaller geographic areas, thus limiting its utility for Anchorage residents and policymakers with criminal justice concerns. To compensate for this limitation, the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage administered a local version of the NCVS during second quarter 2002. By surveying adult residents of Anchorage, the project, titled the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey (AACVS), generated a wealth of information on crime victimization, neighborhood conditions, fear, and policing in Anchorage. This report presents the results of the AACVS.