• ACI Technical Report: Initial Measures Derived from Census

      Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-06-09)
      The decennial census provides a wealth of information about communities that has been mined by social scientist for decades. The purpose of this technical report is to describe an initial set of measures taken from or derived from the 2000 U.S. Census in an effort to develop a statistical description of Anchorage communities for use with the Anchorage Community Indicators project of the University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center. The initial set of measures isolated from census are inspired by two principal bodies of work: (1) the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, an exceptionally well endowed research effort that took neighborhood measurement very seriously; and, (2) Peter Blau’s work that specifies parameter of social structure, heterogeneity, and inequality. The focus of the paper is on documenting how the measures were formed from 2000 Summary File 3 census tables. However, measures without conceptual content are of little value. Accordingly, the paper will offer a brief introduction to the derivative works (PHDCN, Blau) and then follow with a fairly detailed presentation of each measure (what concept is addressed, how it is measured, how the measure is distributed across block group and census tracts, and isolation of the census tables providing essential counts).
    • ADAM-Anchorage Data: Are They Representative?

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03)
      This paper presents the results of a study designed to assess the representativeness of realized samples of recent arrestees selected for the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program in Anchorage, Alaska. Because one of the most important goals of the ADAM program is to produce scientific information on the prevalence of alcohol and drug use behaviors among arrestees that is generalizable to an entire local arrestee population, establishing the representativeness of realized samples (or isolating inherent biases) is an essential first step to meaningful use of these data to address locally defined problems. In order to determine the reasonableness of inferences grounded in realized samples of ADAM respondents, an analysis was done comparing various characteristics between each stage of the sample selection process including the census of eligible arrestee population, the designed ADAM arrestee sample, arrestees available for interview, arrestees actually interviewed (“realized” sample), and arrestees that provided urine sample (“realized” sample). If the realized samples are similar to the census we can have a greater degree of confidence in our capacity to describe the population of Anchorage arrestees using ADAM data. Also, if it happens that departures are detected between realized samples and the arrestee census we are better positioned to condition the inferences made by integrating these discerned biases into our conclusions.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 2005)

      Chamard, Sharon; Carns, Teresa W.; Langworthy, Robert H.; McKelvie, Alan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03-01)
      The Spring 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on youth violence in Anchorage, the Alaska Judicial Council's evaluation of three therapeutic courts, the relationship between drug use and arrest offenses in Anchorage, and Bureau of Justice Statistics figures on the high rates of criminal victimization experienced by Alaska Natives and Native Americans.
    • Anchorage Community Indicators: Public Use Data Files

      Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-06-09)
      The Anchorage Community Survey is a biannual study conducted by the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage as a principal component of the Community Indicators Project at UAA. As the premier source of data on Anchorage Community Indicators, the ACS also provides insight into the communities of Anchorage, Girdwood and Eagle River. This document explains the various SPSS datasets, collection methods, and variables of the 2005 Anchorage Community Survey (https://scholarworks.alaska.edu/handle/11122/3729).
    • The Anchorage Community Survey, 2005: Sourcebook

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-05-06)
      A randomly selected sample of 2,485 adult residents of the Municipality of Anchorage participated in a telephone survey conducted by the Justice Center over a five-month period in late 2004 and early 2005. The results, compiled in this sourcebook, provide one of the most detailed pictures available of community attitudes within the network of communities forming the Anchorage municipality, containing information on the demographics of residents, their perceptions of the social cohesion in their community, and their satisfaction with various municipal and government functions, including policing. These survey results are organized by demographic measures and by community council area.
    • Atlas of Anchorage Community Indicators

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Flexman-Evans, Shel L.; Chamard, Sharon; McKelvie, Alan R.; Yunker, Donald (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-05)
      The Anchorage Community Indicators (ACI) project is designed to make information (extracted from data) accessible so that conversations about the health and well-being of Anchorage may become more completely informed. Policy makers, social commentators, service delivery systems, and scholars often stake out positions based on anecdotal evidence or hunches when, in many instances, solid, empirical evidence could be compiled to support or challenge these opinions.The Atlas of Anchorage Community Indicators makes empirical information about neighborhoods widely accessible to many different audiences. The initial selection of indicators for presentation in the Atlas was inspired by Peter Blau and his interest in measures of heterogeneity (diversity) and inequality and by the work of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. In both cases the measures they developed were well-conceptualized and validated. The Atlas presents community indicators at the census block group level derived from data captured in the 2000 U.S. Census and the 2005 Anchorage Community Survey. All maps in the Atlas are overlaid by Community Council boundaries to facilitate comparisons across maps.
    • Collective Efficacy and Firearms Violence in Anchorage, Alaska: Preliminary Findings

      Evans, Shel Llee; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-02)
      This paper seeks to advance the discussion of the utility of collective efficacy, as captured by Sampson, Raudenbush and Earls, in understanding community levels of crime by exploring the relation between community structure, collective efficacy, and in this case firearms violence, in Anchorage, Alaska. The specific aims of this paper are to report the results of a test of the collective efficacy thesis, modeled loosely after the test presented in the 1997 Science paper by Sampson, Raudenbush and Earls, as an explanation of neighborhood rates of firearms violence in Anchorage.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Sexual Assaults in Anchorage, Alaska

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-10)
      It has long been known that forcible rapes and sexual assaults occur at a higher rate in Anchorage and in Alaska than in the U.S. as a whole. The Justice Center, in collaboration with the Anchorage Police Department, conducted an epidemiological study aimed at providing a better understanding of the parameters of the rape and sexual assault problem in Anchorage. Researchers looked at case data drawn from the 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000 and 2001. These data provide the first solid information on victim and suspect characteristics, time and location of assaults, and other details about sexual assaults and rapes reported to the police. In some cases the data contradict some of the more common assumptions regarding Anchorage’s rape problem.
    • Dispositions of DWI Arrestees: Anchorage, 1996

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Crum, Peter (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1999-07)
      This study explores the dispositions of subjects arrested in Anchorage, Alaska during 1996 for driving while intoxicated (DWI). The project was designed to describe the Anchorage criminal justice system’s processing of DWI offenders and to isolate legal and extralegal variables that predict various offender dispositions. This report presents a literature review of studies relating to legal and extra-legal factors affecting court processing of offenders; discusses methodologies of the present study; presents flow charts of DWI arrestee processing in Anchorage; and presents the multivariate analysis that isolates significant correlates of DWI arrest disposition.
    • Drugs and Crime in Anchorage, Alaska: A Note

      Langworthy, Robert H.; McKelvie, Alan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-05-20)
      This research note examines the relationship between drug use and offense charged through data collected in 2003 from 259 recent arrestees in Anchorage, Alaska using the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) protocol. The analysis is restricted to examining those ADAM participants who tested positive for marijuana and cocaine use.
    • Exploratory Spatial Analyses of Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      Using data on the locations of sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000 and 2001, the authors used Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis techniques to (1) identify the locations where sexual assaults were concentrated and (2) examine the correlates of these spatial concentrations. In both analyses, the authors also examined differences between white and Native victimizations. The spatial concentrations of sexual assault victimizations vary significantly by race, as do the correlates of the respective spatial concentrations. The authors conclude that there is a relationship between assault locations and bar locations, but that the relationship far from perfect and the question of whether there is a causal mechanism exists remains unknown. Nonetheless, successful interventions to prevent sexual assaults must involve bars; but targeting bars will be both inefficient and insufficient for fully addressing the problem of sexual assault prevention in Anchorage.
    • Literature Review: Diverting Mentally Ill Offenders from Jail

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Crum, Peter (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1997)
      This literature review describes literature available on the topic of diverting mentally ill offenders from jail; outlines major themes found in the literature; analyzed programs described in the literature by type; and highlights recommendations from the literature.
    • Mapping Sex Offender Addresses: The Utility of the Alaska Sex Offender Registry as a Research Data Base

      Curtis, Richard W.; Godwin, Maurice; Langworthy, Robert H.; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-10)
      The registration of sex offenders was part of a national effort to enhance public safety by permitting law enforcement officials to track the location of convicted sex offenders after their release. All fifty states have enacted legislation requiring persons convicted of various sex-related offenses to register with law enforcement agencies; many states also grant public access to all or a portion of their registries. This document reports on the Alaska Statistical Analysis Center's efforts to improve data accuracy in the Alaska Sex Offender Registry, maintained by the Alaska State Troopers, and to assess the registry's utility as a research tool.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2006: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Farrell, Chad; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-11-02)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey) was a cooperative effort on the part of Mat-Su College, the University of Alaska-Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough which asked Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The survey was distributed to every Borough household in the spring of 2006; a total of 2,600 were received, coded, and analyzed for the report. The Sourcebook provides detailed tabular results in six major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; (5) higher education; and (6) respondent background information.
    • The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey, 2007: A Sourcebook of Community Attitudes

      Evans, Shel L.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-06-21)
      The Matanuska-Susitna Borough Community Survey (Mat-Su Survey) was a cooperative effort on the part of Mat-Su College, the University of Alaska-Anchorage (UAA) and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough which asked Mat-Su Borough residents to evaluate the quality of Borough services, provide opinions about Borough decision-making, and sum up their perceptions about a range of issues relevant to the present and future of the Mat-Su community. The survey was distributed to 2,478 residents of the Mat-Su Borough in the spring of 2007; a total of 1,388 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 56.1%. The Sourcebook provides results in five major areas: (1) evaluation of current borough services; (2) use of borough facilities; (3) life in Mat-Su neighborhoods; (4) local government access, policies, and practices; and (5) respondent background information.
    • Police Alcohol-Related Services Study (PASS), Phase II: A Description of the Beliefs, Perceptions and Attitudes of Anchorage Police Department Employees

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2005-05-01)
      The principal aim of the Police Alcohol-related Services Study (PASS) was to expand knowledge about the fiscal, organizational, and cultural impact of citizen alcohol use on the Anchorage Police Department (APD). Phase II of the study employed a voluntary, self-administered questionnaire provided to all members of the APD regardless of rank, sworn status, or operational division. The questionnaire was designed to explore respondents' perceptions of their alcohol-related workload; perceptions of community problems; perceived links between alcohol use and selected social problems; attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs about the policing of alcohol-related incidents and the people involved with them; and personal and vicarious experience with alcohol-related incidents. The report describes survey response through comparison of APD employee responses across divisions within the department: operations vs. administration, patrol vs. non-patrol, and sworn vs. non-sworn.
    • The Police Alcohol-Related Services Study (PASS): A Study of the Intersection of Public Alcohol Use and Routine Police Patrol

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2004-06-01)
      The principal aim of the Police Alcohol-related Services Study (PASS) was to expand knowledge about the fiscal, organizational, and cultural impact of citizen alcohol use on the Anchorage Police Department (APD). This report presents results from Phase I of the study, which examines the impact of citizen alcohol use as it relates directly to police patrol with a primary focus on issues of time-task allocations among Anchorage patrol officers. Data was collected through direct field observations of routine patrol operations of Anchorage police officers by professionally trained and certified interviewers.
    • Preliminary Results From the Long-Term Inmate Survey: Focus on Child Abuse Histories

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Barnes, Allan R.; Curtis, Richard (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1998-04-21)
      This preliminary report of long-term inmates in Alaska correctional facilities finds that over 80 percent of long-term inmates report having been physically abused as children, over 65 percent report having suffered neglect. Other findings related to the child abuse histories of long-term inmates are also reported.
    • Results From the Long-Term Inmate Survey: Focus on Child Abuse Histories

      Langworthy, Robert H.; Barnes, Allan R.; Curtis, Richard (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1998-06)
      This report of long-term inmates in Alaska correctional facilities attempts to describe the childhood experiences of a sample of long-term inmates, address the "cycle of abuse" issue; and present the correlates of abuse which may impact the pattern of offending or inmate functioning. Over 80 percent of long-term inmates report having been physically abused as children; over 65 percent report having suffered neglect.
    • Seasonal Use of Marijuana and Cocaine by Arrestees in Anchorage, Alaska

      Langworthy, Robert H.; McKelvie, Alan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-05-20)
      This paper explores the relation between season (fall, winter, spring and summer) and drug use among arrestees. The analysis examines seasonal differences of proportions of drug tests positive for marijuana or cocaine among recently arrested and booked suspects in Anchorage, Alaska. The study is based on Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) data collected in Anchorage during the period between 1999 and the third quarter of 2003.