• 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Samaniego, Sandy; Morton, Lauree; Rosay, André B.; Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2010-09-30)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation presents an overview of key results from the 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) for Alaska statewide conducted from May to June 2010, with results released on September 30, 2010 in Anchorage. The study provides the first definitive measures of incidence and prevalence violence against women in Alaska. Findings include: * About 59% of adult women in Alaska have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * Nearly 12% have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * About 37% of adult women in the Alaska have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * About 48% have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime.
    • ADAM-Anchorage Data: Are They Representative?

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03)
      This paper presents the results of a study designed to assess the representativeness of realized samples of recent arrestees selected for the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program in Anchorage, Alaska. Because one of the most important goals of the ADAM program is to produce scientific information on the prevalence of alcohol and drug use behaviors among arrestees that is generalizable to an entire local arrestee population, establishing the representativeness of realized samples (or isolating inherent biases) is an essential first step to meaningful use of these data to address locally defined problems. In order to determine the reasonableness of inferences grounded in realized samples of ADAM respondents, an analysis was done comparing various characteristics between each stage of the sample selection process including the census of eligible arrestee population, the designed ADAM arrestee sample, arrestees available for interview, arrestees actually interviewed (“realized” sample), and arrestees that provided urine sample (“realized” sample). If the realized samples are similar to the census we can have a greater degree of confidence in our capacity to describe the population of Anchorage arrestees using ADAM data. Also, if it happens that departures are detected between realized samples and the arrestee census we are better positioned to condition the inferences made by integrating these discerned biases into our conclusions.
    • Alaska Criminal Justice Operating Budgets, 2001-2013

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-07)
      This fact sheet presents data on the fiscal year operating budgets enacted by the Alaska Legislature for six key criminal justice agencies from state fiscal years 2001 to 2013. These agencies include the Department of Corrections, Department of Public Safety, Alaska Court System, Division of Juvenile Justice, Criminal Divison of the Department of Law, and Legal and Advocacy Services within the Department of Administration (including the Office of Public Advocacy, the Public Defender Agency, and the Violent Crimes Compensation Board). The budget information presented reflects appropriations rather than actual agency expenditures. Operating budget data was extracted from appropriation bills enacted by the Alaska Legislature and published by the Alaska Office of Management and Budget. The inflation-adjusted data show sizable increases in the amount of funding allocated for each of the six agencies from FY 2001 to FY 2013, but the overall percentage of statewide operating budget funds dedicated to criminal justice remained relatively steady.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 19, No. 4 (Winter 2003)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Giblin, Matthew; Riley, John (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-01-01)
      The Winter 2003 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) on drug use trends and alcohol use among Anchorage arrestees, ADAM in an international context, other measures of drug use, findings from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey on fear of crime and quality of life in Anchorage, and a review essay on a recent book about mass incarceration.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 20, No. 1 (Spring 2003)

      Bronen, Robin; Myrstol, Brad A.; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-03-01)
      The Spring 2003 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on immigration, with articles on operations of the former Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS) in Alaska (FY 1999–2001) and immigration court in Anchorage (1993–2002), the immigration consequences of criminal convictions, the reorganization of INS under the new Department of Homeland Security, and noncitizens among Anchorage arrestees.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 21, No. 1 (Spring 2004)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Moras, Antonia; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-02-01)
      The Spring 2004 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on role of alcohol involvement in police patrol work, mentally ill inmates in U.S. and Alaska prisions, the state of state mental health funding to the Alaska Department of Corrections, and measures that can be used in examining effectiveness of alcohol control policies in Alaska.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 21, No. 2 (Summer 2004)

      Riley, John; Myrstol, Brad A.; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-06-01)
      The Summer 2004 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on Alaska justice system expenditures and employment from 1984 to 2001; a review essay about a recent book about the impact of incarceration and reentry on children, families, and communities; a discussion of incarcerated parents in Alaska; results of an Anchorage public survey on legal sanctions for gun crimes; and Alaska laws regarding the loss and restoration of voting rights.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 2005)

      Rosay, André B.; Riley, John; Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-06-01)
      The Summer 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on homeless youth in Homer, a review essay of a recent book about mass incarceration, an overview of probation and parole in Alaska, and public perceptions of and experiences with Anchorage Police Department.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 2 (Summer 2009)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-06-01)
      The Summer 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles describing the relationship between drug use and criminal offending among male arrestees in Anchorage, a look at homelessness in Alaska, and results of a victim service training needs assessment survey.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 27, No. 3 (Fall 2010) 

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-12)
      The Fall 2010 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on school resource officers (SROs); methamphetamine prevention efforts; and a recent 9th Circuit ruling on felon disenfranchisement.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 28, No. 1 (Spring 2011)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-03-01)
      The Spring 2011 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on Anchorage residents' perceptions of Anchorage Police Department, Internet crime in the U.S. and Alaska, and Internet crimes against children.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 29, No. 2 (Summer 2012)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Lepage, Cory R.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-06-01)
      The Summer 2012 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on public perceptions of judicial fairness in Alaska criminal courts, an initiative to improve the system of in-state community-based treatment for youth and children with severe emotional disturbances and challenging behaviors, and an update on the work of the Criminal Justice Working Group.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 32, No 1. (Spring 2015)

      Rivera, Marny; Sidmore, Patrick; Armstrong, Barbara; Periman, Deborah; Myrstol, Brad A.; Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      The Spring 2015 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and alcohol abuse in adulthood, limiting public access to criminal records, police–public contacts in Anchorage, and officer-involved shootings in Anchorage.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 32, No. 4 (Winter 2016)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      The Winter 2016 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on approaches to evidence-based criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction in Alaska, and an initiatve to make Alaska and national public health data available online.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 33 No. 1 (Spring 2016)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Blumenstein, Lindsey; Rivera, Marny; Lepage, Cory R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-09-21)
      The Spring 2016 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum includes articles focusing on University of Alaska students' disclosures of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimizations; a summary of the provisions of the criminal justice reform measure Senate Bill 91 "Omnibus Criminal Law & Procedure; Corrections" enacted into law in July 2016 ; and findings from a survey of Anchorage adults on perceptions of youth marijuana use and youth non-medical use of prescription drugs.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 2 (Fall 2017)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela; Payne, Troy C.; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      The Fall 2017 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features two stories on crime rates — in relation to criminal justice reform and in relation to police staffing — that caution using crime rates as a single factor to determine policy. A story on Crisis Intervention Teams shows how specialized responses are helping law enforcement deal with calls from individuals with mental illness and/or substance use disorders. The Fall 2017 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories and a video (with transcript) on property crime rates in Alaska.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 4 (Spring 2018)  

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Spring 2018 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) as first responders in sexual abuse of a minor and sexual assault cases, findings from the 2014–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands, Alaska's progress on the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative, and a review of a book on the Sequential Intercept Model, which offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system. The Spring 2018 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories.
    • Alaska Offender Profile: Adult Probation/Parole, 2002–2012

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-06)
      This fact sheet presents data on characteristics of offenders under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) for the period 2002–2012, and briefly describes how probation and parole operate in Alaska. Data were extracted from the annual Offender Profile publication of the Alaska Department of Corrections. Data presented include total numbers of adult probationers and parolees, rates of adult probation/parole supervision, percentage breakdowns of the probation/parole population by sex and race, and distribution of probation/parole cases among the three largest DOC-PP offices. There has been a notable increase in the total number of persons subject to probation/parole supervision in Alaska over the 11-year period, but this increase has not outpaced the state’s population growth.
    • Alaska Results First Initiative: Progress Report & Initial Findings

      Valle, Araceli; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-07-15)
      This report presents the initial results of Alaska’s Results First Initiative, which is examining both the effectiveness and the efficiency of the state's adult criminal justice programs by conducting a comprehensive review of the full array of programs funded by the state. The review includes a thorough inventory of state-funded programs, determining the proportion of those programs that are evidence-based, and detailing both the costs of operating those programs, as well as the benefits derived from them via reductions in offender recidivism. The Alaska Results First Iniative is a participant in the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, a "smart justice" approach to reducing recidivism under the auspices of The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, that is being led in our Alaska by the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC), housed in the UAA Justice Center.
    • Alaska Results First — Benefit-Cost Findings: Adult Criminal Justice Programs

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Valle, Araceli (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-06-15)
      This slideshow, presented to the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission and Alaska Criminal Justice Working Group, presents Results First benefit to cost model estimates on 19 Alaska adult criminal justice programs. The Results First analysis of evidence-based programs, developed in partnership with the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, provides policymakers with a tool to better understand the relationship between the state’s monetary investment in programs and the return on that investment in terms of the benefits of reduced recidivism.