• 2017-2018 Infographics for the evaluation of Project HOPE

      Druffel, Ryan; Porter, Rebecca; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2019)
      Opioid Response Programs (ORPs) across Alaska partner with DHHS, Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention (OSMAP) to distribute opioid overdose rescue kits to members of the general public and to professionals (e.g., first responders, agency/organization staff, etc.). This work consists of two infographics, and is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grant 1H79SP022117.
    • An environmental scan of the role of nurses in preventing fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

      King, Diane; Hanson, Bridget; Porter, Rebecca; Edwards, Alexandra (PubMed, 1/25/2018)
      Nurses are in an ideal position to talk to their patients of reproductive age about alcohol use and encourage the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Effective conversations can be efficiently included in the clinical encounter to identify alcohol misuse and offer appropriate follow-up. This report presents results of an environmental scan of resources relevant to nursing professionals and nurses' role in addressing alcohol misuse. Gaps in nursing education and practice guidelines with regard to defining the nursing role in preventing alcohol-exposed pregnancies were revealed. Findings identified a need to promote adoption among nurses of evidence-based preventive practices to prevent alcohol misuse.
    • FASD Costs: Evidence from Hawaii Medicaid Data

      Hanson, Bridget; Porter, Rebecca; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019)
      Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), a collection of permanent yet preventable developmental disabilities and birth defects resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure, are associated with substantial costs. We use information from Hawaii Medicaid data for individuals who have at least one FASD-related condition. The total spending for these individuals between 2011 and 2015 was $460,515,584. Of that total, more than $32 million is directly associated with FASD-related visits/codes. We find that the average FASD-related visit costs $121, which is more expensive than the average medicaid visit. We also find that the frequency of FASD-related visits increases with age. We find evidence that the number of initial conditions is positively associated with the number of visits and accumulated medical costs and that 20% of the patients are responsible for 85.85% of the total spending. This paper was supported by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement 5NU01DD001143.
    • Medicaid Policies for Alcohol SBI Reimbursement

      Smith, Oliver; Hanson, Bridget; Porter, Rebecca (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2017)
      The purpose of this report was to review existing reimbursement policies by state Medicaid agency, including the District of Columbia (D.C.), in order to understand similarities and differences associated with financial compensation for alcohol screening and brief intervention (SBI) services. Alcohol SBI is an evidence-based practice known to help reduce atrisk alcohol consumption among patients who drink too much. 1 Although alcohol SBI was designed to be a population-based approach to address unhealthy alcohol consumption, its current utilization is limited. 2 Implementation of the practice into routine clinical care remains a challenge at the health system level even with support from federal resources (e.g., SBIRT: Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment). One way to encourage the uptake of alcohol SBI/SBIRT among providers is to ensure that the service is reimbursable by third-party payers. However, reimbursement opportunities vary by state and payer, and in some locations are non-existent. Information about the current status of policies will assist in the development of policies and incentives to encourage healthcare providers and systems to submit claims for alcohol SBI/SBIRT and potentially increase the routine uptake of the service in clinical care.
    • 'Please tell us about a time you administered naloxone': Maximizing data collection opportunities with challenging informants

      Porter, Rebecca; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2019)
      This presentation provides a brief overview of results from qualitative study of Naloxone distribution and opioid overdose prevention education program in Alaska, and was presented at a meeting of the American Evaluation Association held in Minneapolis, MN, November 2019.
    • Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Practice Behaviors, Attitudes, and Confidence among Members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives

      Neander, Lucia; Hanson, Bridget; Porter, Rebecca (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-06-01)
      As part of an ACNM collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its partners and grantees on a project to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), ACNM members were surveyed to generate an assessment of practice behaviors of certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives related to the prevention of FASDs. The information will be used as a baseline from which to measure change in nurse-midwives’ and midwives’ practice behaviors over the course of the project. Results from the assessment will also be used to inform detailed collaborative activities between ACNM and CDC grantees whose efforts specifically target nurse-midwives (i.e., University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), University of California San Diego, University of Pittsburgh).
    • Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Practice Behaviors, Attitudes, and Confidence among Members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives 2017

      Hanson, Bridget; Neander, Lucia; Porter, Rebecca (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2017)
      As part of an ACNM collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its partners and grantees on a project to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), ACNM members were surveyed to generate an assessment of practice behaviors of certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives related to the prevention of FASDs. The information will be used as a baseline from which to measure change in nurse-midwives’ and midwives’ practice behaviors over the course of the project. Results from the assessment will also be used to inform detailed collaborative activities between ACNM and CDC grantees whose efforts specifically target nurse-midwives (i.e., University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), University of California San Diego, University of Pittsburgh).
    • Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Practice Behaviors, Attitudes, and Confidence among Members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives 2018

      Porter, Rebecca; Hanson, Bridget; Mertz, Robyn (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2018)
      As part of an ACNM collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its partners and grantees on a project to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), ACNM members were surveyed to assess the practice behaviors of certified nurse midwives and certified midwives related to the prevention of FASDs. Two surveys were conducted; the first served as a baseline from which to measure change in nurse-midwives’ and midwives’ practice behaviors over the course of the project. Results from the baseline assessment were also used to inform detailed collaborative activities between ACNM and CDC grantees whose efforts specifically target nurse-midwives (i.e., University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA); University of California, San Diego; University of Pittsburgh). The second survey was conducted 15 months after the baseline as a follow-up and findings were compared to the baseline.
    • SBIRT Utilization and Billing among Prenatal Providers in Hawaii

      Tanner, Stacy; Porter, Rebecca; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2018)
      This report presents findings from key informant interviews that were conducted to understand Hawaii prenatal providers’ use of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) in everyday practice. Five prenatal providers who practice in Hawaii participated in the interviews. Although participants acknowledged the importance of utilizing SBIRT in prenatal care, SBIRT appeared to be underutilized. Most did not have standard SBIRT procedures incorporated within their practice. Participants’ primary concerns regarding routine use of SBIRT included time constraints, lack of technology within the electronic health record, and stigma. Recommendations from prenatal providers regarding SBIRT decision-making, billing process improvements, and provider incentives to enhance reimbursement practices are discussed.
    • What do we know about Narcan Utilization among Alaskans? Findings from 3 years

      Porter, Rebecca; Druffel, Ryan; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 1/22/2020)