• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 1977)

      Havelock, John E.; Ring, Peter Smith; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-05)
      The Alaska Justice Forum, a pilot project funded through a grant from the Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, will be built around educational material for Alaska justice system professionals, according to the lead article in the inaugural issue of the Forum. Other article include a review of recent court decisions related to the right of an accused to have counsel at pre-indictment lineups, first of a six-part series on the history of the law of search and seizure, an update on the ongoing revision of Alaska's criminal code, and a description of continuing education courses and seminars for criminal justice professionals being developed by the Criminal Justice Center.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 2 (June 1977)

      Ring, Peter Smith; Conn, Stephen; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-06)
      The June 1977 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads with an article describing the work of the Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission and provisions of the proposed Alaska Revised Criminal Code. Other articles discuss projections for criminal justice employment in Alaska, citizen involvement in crime prevention, and innovations in handling minor disputes. A review of Alaska case law involving Miranda rights and second of a six-part series on the history of the law of search and seizure are also presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 3 (July 1977)

      Rubinstein, Michael L.; Hill, Judy; Angell, John E.; Ring, Peter Smith; Havelock, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-07)
      The July1977 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads with a presentation of salient findings from the Alaska Judicial Council's interim report of the Alaska attorney general's ban on plea bargaining. Other articles include a history of the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency (CJPA), which serves as staff to the Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, a description of the newly developed two-year and four-year Justice degree programs at the University of Alaska, and a critical look at the misuse of public opinion surveys to address criminal justice issues. The third of a six-part series on the history of the law of search and seizure is accompanied by a review of U.S. case law on search and seizure. Upcoming meetings and seminars are announced.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 5 (September 1977)

      Warden, Arlene; Stern, Barry; Ring, Peter Smith; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-09)
      Findings of an Alaska Judicial Council report on felony sentencing patterns indicate that factors such as defendant's race, occupation, and background, as well as criminal history, have a significant bearing on felony sentencing in Alaska. In other articles in the September 1977 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, the staff counsel of the Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission describes classification of the three crimes of murder, manslaughter, and criminally negligent manslaughter under the proposed Revised Alaska Criminal Code, and the fifth of a six-part series on the history of the law of search and seizure is presented. The issue also includes announcements of upcoming meetings and conferences, resources, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 6 (October 1977)

      Carpeneti, Anne; Endell, Roger V.; Ring, Peter Smith; Hutchings, Steve (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-10)
      The lead article of the October 1977 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum describes the provisions of House Bill 549, which would comprehensively revise Alaska's statutes pertaining to drug offenses. Other articles report on the 107th Congress of the American Correctional Association held August 21-25, 1977 in Milwaukee, describes reclassification of crimes of assault under the proposed Revised Alaska Criminal Code, a present the sixth of a six-part series on the history of the law of search and seizure. A justice training calendar is also included.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 8 (December 1977)

      Stern, Barry; Havelock, John E.; Ring, Peter Smith; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-12)
      The December 1977 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum profiles the first Criminal Justice Center student to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Justice. Other articles describe the provisions of the proposed Revised Alaska Criminal Code involving robbery, armed robbery, and accomplice liability; and examines how government systems can be designed to reduce opportunity for public misconduct. Also included are a digest of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions, the Spring 1978 semester schedule of Justice B.A. courses at University of Alaska campuses in Anchorage and Fairbanks, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 1 (January 1978)

      Alaska Judicial Council; Neff, Ben L.; Bardonski, Phyllis; Warden, Arlene; Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-01)
      The January 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with a findings of an Alaska Judicial Council study on domestic violence and the Council's proposal to establish a citizen dispute center in Anchorage for the resolution of domestic disputes where injured parties are unwilling to press criminal charges. Other articles describe an experimental diversion program in Ketchikan for juvenile status offenders intended to minimize the entry of youth into the criminal justice system; a pilot project of the Alaska Judicial Council to involve and inform citizens about the criminal justice system; and the first of a six-part series designed to provide a working knowledge of the basic issues surrounding interrogation and confessions. Also included is a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 3 (March 1978)

      Endell, Roger V.; Huston, William H.; Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-03)
      The March 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features the text of an address by William H. Huston, director of the Alaska Division of Corrections, touching on Phase II of the correctional master plan, growing prison populations and overcrowding, alternatives to incarceration, and risk management. Other articles include an exploration of the possibilities of developing prison industries within Alaska's correctional system and the third of six-part series on the law on confessions, focusing on decisions of the Alaska Supreme Court in the area of criminal law on Miranda warnings, interrogations, and confessions. Also included is a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 4 (April 1978)

      Ring, Peter Smith; Naito, Lisa; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-04)
      The April 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features an examination of the Alaska Supreme Court's controversial decision on search and seizure in Zehrung v. State of Alaska (569 P.2d 189 (1977); 573 P.2d 858 (1978)). A history of the Hawaii correctional master plan is offered as a comparison with the Alaska correctional master plan. The Community Crime Prevention Program, operating under a grant by the Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, is described. The fourth in a six-part series on the law on confessions focuses on custody and waivers as they are affected by the decisions of the Alaska Supreme Court. The Criminal Justice Center reports on the seminars and conferences offered by the Criminal Justice Center, which have been attended by ~700 criminal justice professionals between February 1977 and February 1978. HB 661, the proposed Revised Alaska Criminal Code, has been approved by the Alaska House of Representatives and awaits action in the Alaska Senate. This issue also includes an announcement of upcoming law enforcement seminar, the summer schedule of justice courses offered in Anchorage, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 5 (June 1978)

      Havelock, John E.; White, Teresa J.; Ring, Peter Smith; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-06)
      The June 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents a subjective analysis of future criminal justice trends in Alaska; based on population shifts, increases in property ownership, and increased reporting, the author predicts that crime will rise in rural areas and decrease in urban areas in upcoming years. Preliminary results of a two-year evaluation by the Alaska Judicial Council of the effects of Alaska's plea bargaining ban are reported. A study prepared for the Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice determined that the pretrial detention rate for juveniles in Fairbanks was eight times higher than nationally recommended standards. The fifth in a six-part series on the law on confessions discusses voluntary statements and the problems caused by multiple confessions by a defendant. Also included is a digest of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions in criminal appeals cases, a book review, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 6 (July 1978)

      Stern, Barry; Cobb, Chris; Robinson, Elliott H.; Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-07)
      In the July 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, the staff counsel of the Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission describes the major provisions of the Revised Alaska Criminal Code as approved by the Alaska Legislature in June 1978, and highlights changes from the draft revised code proposed by the subcommission. The Anchorage Pretrial Intervention Project, which became operational in early 1978, is described. An offender reentry program of the Alaska Division of Corrections to help ex-offenders adjust to life after prison is described. The concluding installment of a six-part series on the law of confessions discusses the use of evidence obtained from defendants which is inadmissible under Miranda guidelines or for other reasons related to violation of defendants' Fifth or Sixth Amendment rights. Additional articles discuss a national survey indicating the need for sex offender treatment programs and a report on more efficient police patrol procedures. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, announcements of upcoming courses and seminars, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 7 (August 1978)

      Ring, Peter Smith; Trivette, Samuel H.; Kowacki, Marian; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-08)
      The August 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum offers a historical and legal primer on the exclusionary rule, which requires the suppression of evidence resulting from unconstitutional searches and seizures. The director of the Alaska Parole Board describes the "parole guidelines model" adopted by the parole board as a method of releasing sentenced offenders on parole. A program to place pre- and post-trial criminal offenders in community-based treatment programs is described. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, the fall 1978 schedule of criminal justice courses offered on University of Alaska campuses, announcements of upcoming seminars and workshops, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 8 (September 1978)

      Ring, Peter Smith; Hornaday, James C.; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-09)
      The September 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads with an article proposing alternatives to the exclusionary rule, which requires the suppression of evidence resulting from unconstitutional searches and seizures. Homer District Court Judge James C. Hornaday describes current trends in criminal law. The decision of the Alaska Supreme Court in William A. Rust v. State of Alaska (584 P.2d 38 (1978)) in regards to rights of prisoners to psychological or psychiatric treatment is discussed. Additional articles discuss community service as an alternative sentence and a nationwide study involving 30 police departments on predicting success in clearing burglary cases. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, announcements of an upcoming death investigation seminar, and a justice training calendar.
    • The Alcoholic Beverage Control Board in Alaska

      Ring, Peter Smith (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-12)
      Alaska state law provides that Alaska communities may make legal or illegal the local sale of liquor. Further, they may restrict legal liquor sales to community-run liquor stores and may prosecute other sales of liquor or the possession or transportation of alcoholic beverages with the intent to sell them illegally. This study of the Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board, conducted in connection with a larger research project dealing with varying legal approaches to the control of alcohol use in rural Alaska, was designed to determine the extent to which statewide legalistic control mechanisms for beverage alcohol helped or hindered local option control efforts.
    • Developing Prosecutorial Charging Guidelines: A Case Study

      Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-03-14)
      In July 1975, Alaska's attorney general announced his intention to end plea bargaining by assistant attorneys in all criminal cases involving violations of Alaska criminal law. While the major thrust of this policy change was intended to halt negotiations over sentencing, the policy also dealt — albeit less intensely — with charge bargaining. This paper describes efforts ot the Alaska Department of Law's Criminal Division to enhance the effectiveness of plea bargaining policy through the development of uniform, statewide charging guidelines, including the development of Project PROSECUTOR (PROSecutor Enhanced Charging Using Tested Options and Research), and presents preliminary findings from the project's prosecutorial screening intake component.
    • Evaluation of Pre-Trial Diversion Project, State of Alaska, Department of Law

      Ring, Peter Smith; Bruce, Kevin (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-01)
      In February 1978 the Alaska Department of Law initiated a pilot pretrial intervention (PTI) project in Anchorage directed at first-time property offenders with no history of violence and no current drug or alcohol dependency. The project was aimed at reducing recidivism and costs to the criminal justice system, and included a built-in evaluation component. This report explores the PTI project's impact by (1) comparing PTI clients with other defendants; (2) investigating compliance of PTI clients with contracts to which they agree at time of program entry; (3) comparing costs of PTI compared with those generated in ordinary criminal cases; (4) evaluating the program's administration, identifying its deficiencies, and suggesting improvements; and (5) looking at recidivism rates of PTI clients.
    • Human Resources, Training and Education: A Survey of Alaska Criminal Justice Agencies

      Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-09)
      This report presents results of a survey of Alaska criminal justice agencies. The survey was designed to provide baseline data on the educational levels of criminal justice personnel and existing training programs in Alaska; and to elicit from criminal justice agencies their views on subject areas — both in higher education programs and in continuing professional development programs — which those agencies believed deserved attention. A total of 47 agencies, offices, institutions within agencies, and individuals responded to the survey, out of a total of 78 to whom surveys were sent. Respondents represented the law enforcement agencies, the Alaska Court System, the Alaska Department of Law, the Alaska Public Defender, and correctional agencies including probation/parole.
    • Manual of Criminal Law and Procedure

      Ring, Peter Smith; Havelock, John E.; HIckey, Daniel W.; Stern, Barry J. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-07)
      Intended to aid to Alaska law enforcement officers in the performance of their duties in the field, this manual was designed to provide brief, quick access to major points of substantive and procedural criminal law. The manual contained discussion and procedural guidelines for investigatory stops, identification procedures including line-ups, arrest, search and seizure, interrogation, as well as discussion of justification for the use of nondeadly and deadly force whether by peace officers or civilians, culpability, entrapment, trial preparation, and media relations. The section on substantive criminal law deals with a selection of crimes most likely to be encountered by "street" officers as defined with the recently enacted Revised Alaska Criminal Code (effective January 1, 1980), desribing elements of each crime, investigative hints, and differences with previous provisions of the criminal code, where relevant.
    • Potential Impact of Mandatory Minimum Sentencing on Existing Division of Corrections Adult Offender Inmate Capacity

      Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-04)
      This report was prepared for the Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission to provide its members with an assessment of the potential impact on the Alaska Division (later Department) of Corrections adult offender inmate capacity likely to result from enactment of mandatory minimum sentencing provisions. The study projected that DOC would need at least 200 more secure units by 1981 if mandatory minimum sentencing was applied to second or subsequent felony offenders for a limited number of felony violent crimes. Application of mandatory minimums for such offenders to ALL felonies would likely result in DOC's entire capacity being used up within three years after enactment of minimum sentencing guidelines.
    • The Public's Perspective— Justice Administration 1980: A Survey of Public Opinion

      Havelock, John E.; Ring, Peter Smith; Bruce, Kevin (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-08)
      This public opinion survey was commissioned by the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, to help people interested in justice administration in planning, predicting, and educating with respect to the future design and administration of the justice system in Alaska. The survey was conducted during November and December 1979 and included 676 respondents from throughout Alaska. The survey elicited public opinion in four major areas: (1) the climate of public safety, including perceptions of crime rates, public safety, gun ownership, victimization, and family violence; (2) images of the justice professional, including professional skills, professionalism, educational qualifications, discretionary judgments, and discriminatory practices; (3) changes in the law, including the role of public opinion in revision of law, strictness and leniency of laws, perceptions of revisions (including recent revisions in sentencing, the Alaska criminal code, alcohol regulations, and drug laws), perceptions of laws relating to alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs, criminality of gambling and sex offenses, and election of justice officials; and (4) public attitudes toward selected decisions regarding the administration of justice, including law enforcement and corrections priorities, justice services in rural Alaska, consolidation of public safety services, police use of firearms, sentencing, and public education in justice.