• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 2006)

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-03-01)
      The Spring 2006 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on case processing in sexual assault cases, a review of the report of the Rural Justice and Law Enforcement Commission, and a bibliography of six major commissions which have examined the spectrum of Alaska justice system issues since the early 1990s
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 24, No. 3 (Fall 2007)

      Periman, Deborah; Rosay, André B.; Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Evans, Shel L. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-09-01)
      The Fall 2007 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on the collateral consequences of criminal conviction in Alaska, results of an Alaska Judicial Council evaluation of the Alaska Court System's three felony-level therapeutic courts, disproportionate minority contact within the juvenile justice system in Fairbanks North Star Borough, and results of a community survey in Matanuska-Susitna Borough.
    • Quantitative Analysis of Disparities in Juvenile Delinquency Referrals to the Fairbanks North Star Borough, FY2005-06

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2007-10)
      Minority youths in the Fairbanks North Star Borough are referred to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) for delinquent behavior at rates much higher than white youths.This report describes disproportionate minority contact with the Alaska juvenile justice system for youths referred to the Fairbanks office of the Division of Juvenile Justice during fiscal years 2005 and 2006 (July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2006). Possible sources of disproportionate minority contact are subsequently narrowed by examining the impact of race and ethnicity, gender, type of referral, and geography. By developing a detailed understanding of the scope of disproportionate minority contact, we become much better prepared to identify its causes and to develop evidence-based solutions.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2006-05)
      The outcomes of sexual assaults involving one suspect and one victim reported to the Anchorage Police Department (APD) in 2000 to 2003 were examined. Overall, 1,235 sexual assaults were reported to APD during this period, of which 1,074 involved one suspect and one victim. Data were collected on 1,052 of these cases to learn how the Alaska Department of Law disposed of these cases. Of the 1,052 cases examined, 188 (17.9%) were referred to the Department of Law, 127 were accepted for prosecution, and 111 resulted in a conviction. Clearly, the point of greatest attrition is from report to referral, with 85.2 percent of reported sexual assaults not being referred for prosecution. However, most offenders whose cases reach prosecutors are held accountable in some degree through the imposition of criminal sanctions.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the outcomes of sexual assault cases reported to the Anchorage Police Department between January 2000 and December 2003. The data include 1,052 cases involving one suspect and one victim (85% of all reported sexual assaults). Cases and charges were tracked through the Alaska Department of Law to determine what was referred, accepted, and convicted. * Overall, 18% of cases were referred for prosecution. The most common referred charge was a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-nine percent of referred charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 12% of cases were accepted for prosecution. The greatest point of attrition was from report to referral. Once referred, 68% of cases were accepted for prosecution. Sixty-eight percent of charges were accepted by the Department of Law as referred. The most common reasons for not accepting a charge as referred were evidentiary reasons. The most common accepted charge was also a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-five percent of accepted charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 11% of cases resulted in a conviction. Once accepted, 87% of cases resulted in a conviction. Although convictions were common in accepted cases, accepted charges were often dismissed. While 87% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction, 59% of accepted charges were dismissed. Ninety percent of guilty findings were a result of plea bargaining. With plea bargaining, some charges were dismissed but a conviction was still secured. Fifty-six percent of convicted charges were sexual assault charges. The most common convicted charge was for assault, followed by sexual assault in the second degree.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-05)
      The outcomes of sexual assaults involving one suspect and one victim reported to the Anchorage Police Department (APD) in 2000 to 2003 were examined. Overall, 1,235 sexual assaults were reported to APD during this period, of which 1,074 involved one suspect and one victim. Data were collected on 1,052 of these cases to learn how the Alaska Department of Law disposed of these cases. Of the 1,052 cases examined, 188 (17.9%) were referred to the Department of Law, 127 were accepted for prosecution, and 111 resulted in a conviction. Clearly, the point of greatest attrition is from report to referral, with 85.2 percent of reported sexual assaults not being referred for prosecution. However, most offenders whose cases reach prosecutors are held accountable in some degree through the imposition of criminal sanctions.
    • Sexual Assault Study: Differences by Victim's Alcohol Use

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 2, "Sexual Assault Study," describes the spatial patterning and geographical concentration of 282 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2001 by victim's alcohol use.