• Alaska Criminal History Record Information: A White Paper

      Trostle, Lawrence C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-09-26)
      In their Statutory Recommendations submitted in 1989 to the Alaska Department of Public Safety, SEARCH Group, Inc. recommended that the Alaska Public Safety Information Network (APSIN) be expanded to capture and report 18 additional events to improve Alaska criminal history record information (CHRI). This paper examines the viability of including the proposed 18 events in Alaska CHRI, and suggests a distributed data tracking system using the Arrest Tracking Number (ATN) to interface between APSIN and other Alaska justice system databases as the best and most economical means of improving Alaska CHRI. Appendices include the SEARCH report and other information bearing on CHRI standards.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 11, No. 2 (Summer 1994)

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; Cunningham, Patrick; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-06-01)
      The Summer 1994 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum describes a pilot victim-offender mediation program in Anchorage which involves juveniles accused of certain offenses and the victims of those crimes. The number of prisoners under the jurisdiction of federal or state correctional authorities at the end of 1993 reached a record high of 948,881, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), with Alaska’s system increased by 7.1 per cent in 1993, less than the percentage increase for the nation as a whole. A second BJS report finds that nearly one million individuals each year become victims of violent crime while working or on duty, accounting for 15% of the over 6.5 million acts of violence experienced by Americans age 12 or older. A gift of $200,000 from Cook Inlet Region, Inc. (CIRI) to University of Alaska is intended to address justice issues and problems affecting Alaska Natives.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 1 (Spring 1999)

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-03-01)
      The Spring 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents findings from a study of the effectiveness of the Brady Act in Alaska, focusing on procedures used by Alaska law enforcement agencies to determine eligibility of applicants for handgun purchases and looking at handgun purchase applications denied by the Anchorage Police Department; a related article presents views on problems with the Brady Act's implementation. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on capital punishment in the U.S. in 1997, and the use of the death penalty in by other nations is examined.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 19, No. 1 (Spring 2002)

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2002-03-01)
      The Spring 2002 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on Alaska juvenile arrest figures for 2000, juvenile detention in Alaska, juveniles in the Alaska adult justice system, student knowledge of the U.S. Constitution, and capital punishment in the U.S. and internationally.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 7, No. 3 (Fall 1990)

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Rieger, Lisa (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1990-10)
      The Fall 1990 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents findings from a report on the progress of Los Angeles Police Department in actively recruiting women and minorities in response to a 1980 federal consent decree mandating changes in its recruitment, selection, training, and employment practices. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports statistics on criminal victimization for 1989 from the National Crime Survey, which measures personal and household offenses, including crimes not reported to police. The Alaska Sentencing Commission, created to evaluate Alaska’s sentencing laws and practices and to recommend improvements, begins its work.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 8, No. 4 (Winter 1992)

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; McShea, Darren; Perras, Russell; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Schafer, N. E.; Tubbs, Michael P.; Rieger, Lisa (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-01-01)
      The Winter 1992 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study on the nonenforcement role of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs), figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on crime victimization experienced by students aged 12 to 19 in U.S. schools, an analysis of residents of a community corrections center in Anchorage, and a summary of findings from the Alaska Sentencing Commissions 1991 annual report.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 9, No. 1 (Spring 1992)

      Trivette, Samuel H.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-03-01)
      The Spring 1992 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study of 67 parole violators who appeared before the Alaska Parole Board in the summer of 1990, figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on prosecutors in state courts in 1990, and a further look at the the nonenforcement role of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs), which was also discussed in the previous (Winter 1992) issue of the Alaska Justice Forum.
    • APSIN Felony Indicator

      Trostle, Lawrence C. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1991-05-24)
      As part of a larger project to improve the quality of Alaska criminal history records, the Alaska Department of Public Safety in 1991 upgraded the Alaska Public Safety Information Network (APSIN) to provide a felony indicator to indicate whether a criminal conviction was for a felony or misdemeanor. This report, intended for APSIN users, reviews how the felony indicator was established in APSIN, discusses record accuracy, and provides sample APSIN screens to familiarize users with the display location of the felony indicator. An appendix presents an overview of the criteria used in establishing the APSIN felony indicator, which were based on Felony Conviction: A White Paper (Rieger 1991) and approved by the Alaska Department of Law.
    • Brady Statute Data: Adjudicated Mental Defectives and Involuntary Mental Commitments

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09-08)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the first of four reports on these categories, describes how adjudicated mental defectives and involuntary mental commitments can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The report discussed federal statutory definitions of the terms adjudicated as a mental defective, committed to a mental institution, and legal authority; compares these terms with those current in Alaska Statues and used by social service and mental health agencies in the state; and describes, in general, data held by federal, state, local, and private agencies in Alaska. At present, there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either of the two categories with any accuracy: besides technical difficulties in getting different databases to "talk" to each other, records are not kept on mentally ill individuals, and even if they were, access would be prohibited in the face of federal and state laws regarding privacy.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibits the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. These reports describe potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, illegal aliens, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, are the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety—Executive Summary

      Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Atwell, Cassie (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibited the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. This executive report summarizes study findings on potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, noncitizens in the U.S. illegally or unlawfully, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and briefly discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, were the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Illegally or Unlawfully in the United States

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the fourth of four reports on these categories, describes how undocumented immigrants who are unlawfully in the United States can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. It was found that the most feasibile means for obtaining information for the purposes of Brady background checks would be the Verification Information System (VIS) of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). However, project researchers received no response from INS to inquiries about requirements of access to VIS.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who are Subject to a Court Order Restraining Them from Threatening or Committing Acts of Domestic Violence or Abuse

      Atwell, Cassie; Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-03-06)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the second of four reports on these categories, describes how persons subject to a domestic violence restraining order can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The state is rapidly moving to the point where all individuals who meet the Brady definition for this category will be identified, the information housed in a separate database, and reported to federal agencies. AS 18.65.540 provides for a central registry of Domestic Violence Protective Orders, a product of the (state) Domestic Violence Prevention and Victim Protection Act of 1996.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Unlawful Users of or Addicted to Any Controlled Substances

      Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the third of four reports on these categories, describes how persons who are unlawful users or addicted to any controlled substance can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. At this time there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either addicts or controlled substance abusers with any accuracy. Records are not kept on addicts or controlled substance abusers, and even if they were, because of the right to privacy, access would be denied. However the Criminal Case Intake and Disposition form is currently used statewide by law enforcement personnel. It could be modified with little effort to capture information on some addiction/controlled substance abuse events for the purpose of Brady background checks.
    • Policing the Arctic: The North Slope of Alaska

      Angell, John E.; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1993-10)
      Geographic size and lack of roads, among other factors, contribute to unique difficulties in providing effective law enforcement and public safety services to residents of the North Slope Borough of Alaska. Despite comprehensive plans laid in the mid-1970s, the North Slope Borough has not been successful in implementing a broad, multicultural community public safety organizational design. The more traditional professional law enforcement agency which has evolved is perceived by some people as having community and employee relations problems. This paper provides a brief history of law enforcement on the North Slope and presents selected data from a 1993 survey of employees of the North Slope Borough Department of Public Safety (NSBDPS). The data support a hypothesis that indigenous personnel with strong roots in a minority community will be more committed to the community police organization than would be employees without such roots.
    • Victim-Offender Mediation in Anchorage

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; Cunningham, Patrick (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-10)
      Victim-offender mediation programs provide an opportunity for victims to meet the offenders face-to-face in the presence of a trained mediator for the purpose of resolving the injury of the crime in some way. Mediation is offered as a diversion from the justice system which the offender may accept to avoid more formal adjudication. This paper describes a pilot victim-offender mediation program in Anchorage which involves juveniles accused of certain offenses and the victims of those crimes.