• 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Samaniego, Sandy; Morton, Lauree; Rosay, André B.; Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2010-09-30)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation presents an overview of key results from the 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) for Alaska statewide conducted from May to June 2010, with results released on September 30, 2010 in Anchorage. The study provides the first definitive measures of incidence and prevalence violence against women in Alaska. Findings include: * About 59% of adult women in Alaska have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * Nearly 12% have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * About 37% of adult women in the Alaska have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * About 48% have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 2 (Summer 2000)

      Wood, Darryl S.; Araji, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-06-01)
      The Summer 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study of officer turnover in Alaska's Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program, a review essay of the book "A Natural History of Rape" by Randy Thornhill and Craig T. Palmer, and national data on rape rates in the U.S. from 1973 to 1999 based on figures from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 21, No. 1 (Spring 2004)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Moras, Antonia; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-02-01)
      The Spring 2004 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on role of alcohol involvement in police patrol work, mentally ill inmates in U.S. and Alaska prisions, the state of state mental health funding to the Alaska Department of Corrections, and measures that can be used in examining effectiveness of alcohol control policies in Alaska.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 2007)

      Rosay, André B.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Wood, Darryl S.; Kelley, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-03-01)
      The Spring 2007 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles describing stalking incidents reported to Alaska State Troopers from 1994 to 2005, a discussion of Alaska's 1993 stalking statute and a suggested update to it; and current visa programs which address the needs for guest workers in Alaska and the U.S.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 25, No. 1-2 (Spring / Summer 2008)

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rosay, André B.; Periman, Deborah; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Henry, Tara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-03-01)
      The Spring/Summer 2008 double-issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on various aspects of the problem of sexual assault—the nature of the crime, victims and suspects; case prosecution; offender recidivism; public safety and rehabilitation, with articles on case processing of sexual assault cases in rural villages, a description of the sexual assault problem in communities served by the Alaska State Troopers, Sexual assault nurse examinations in Alaska, and Alaska's sex offender registration statute. An additional article looks at national figures on incarcerated parents.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 25, No. 3 (Fall 2008)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Everett, Ronald S.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-09-01)
      The Fall 2008 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum reports on assaults in domestic violence incidents in Alaska communities served primarily by the Alaska State Troopers; the trajectories of juvenile delinquency careers among youth in Anchorage and Fairbanks; and results of a community survey of residents of Northeast Anchorage on public safety and community satisfaction.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 3 (Fall 2009)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-09-01)
      The Fall 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on violence against women, with articles on legal resolutions and attrition in domestic violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers, recent recommendations from Alaska lawmakers and the Governor on reducing violence in Alaska, and the relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence. An additional article details recent data about leading causes of death for Alaska and the U.S.
    • Alaska Native Technical Assistance and Resource Center: Final Report

      Rieger, Lisa; Wood, Darryl S.; Jennings, Michael (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2002-05)
      Too often, federal and state justice programs directed at rural, predominately Alaska Native villages do not sufficiently coordinate planning and funding, and are not tailored to fit local cultures and needs. The language and institutional contexts of granting agencies and requests for proposals for grants frame justice problems and their solutions in ways that may or may not relate to the experiences of Alaska Native villages. The Alaska Native Technical Resource Center (ANTARC) was designed as a three-year project to improve village capacity to identify problems and educate the university and granting agencies about the nature of their justice problems and the resources needed to implement solutions. The initial group involved the Justice Center and four rural communities — Gulkana, Kotlik, Wainwright, and Yakutat — with representatives from the communities chosen by village leaders. This report examines ANTARC's evolution, considers its implementation, evaluates the results, and presents recommendations for promoting effective change in Alaska Native villages.
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: 2011 Results for Anchorage

      Rosay, André B.; Morton, Lauree; Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2011-10-03)
      This is a handout of a Powerpoint slide presentation presenting an overview of key results from the 2011 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Municipality of Anchorage, which was conducted from April to June 2011, with results released on October 3, 2011 in Anchorage. Findings include: * Over 50% of adult women in the Municipality of Anchorage have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * Over 8% have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * Three out of every ten adult women in the Municipality of Anchorage have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * Four out of every ten have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime.
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: 2011 Results for Bristol Bay

      Rosay, André B.; Morton, Lauree; Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2011-10-12)
      This is a handout of a Powerpoint slide presentation providing an overview of key results from the 2011 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Bristol Bay region, which was conducted from April to June 2011, with results released on October 12, 2011 in Dillingham. Findings include: * Over 50% of adult women in the Bristol Bay Region have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * Nearly 15% have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * 3 out of every 10 adult women in the Bristol Bay Region have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * 4 out of every 10 have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime.
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: 2011 Results for Fairbanks

      Rosay, André B.; Morton, Lauree; Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2011-10-07)
      This is a handout of a Powerpoint slide presentation presenting an overview of key results from the 2011 Alaska Victimization Survey for the City of Fairbanks and Fairbanks North Star Borough, which was conducted from April to June 2011, with results released on October 7, 2011 in Fairbanks. Findings for the City of Fairbanks include: * 57.0% of adult women in the City of Fairbanks have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * 11.5% of adult women in the City of Fairbanks have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * 3 out of every 10 adult women in the City of Fairbanks have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * 5 out of every 10 in the City of Fairbanks have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime. Findings for the Fairbanks North Star Borough include: * 44.8% of adult women in the Fairbanks North Star Borough have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * 5.5% of adult women in the Fairbanks North Star Borough have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * 3 out of every 10 adult women in the Fairbanks North Star Borough have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * 3 out of every 10 in the Fairbanks North Star Borough have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime.
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: 2011 Results for Juneau

      Rosay, André B.; Morton, Lauree; Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2011-10-17)
      This is a handout of a Powerpoint slide presentation presenting an overview of key results from the 2011 Alaska Victimization Survey for the City and Borough of Juneau, which was conducted from April to June 2011, with results released on October 17, 2011 in Juneau. Findings include: * Over 50% of adult women in the City and Borough of Juneau have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in their lifetime; * Nearly 15% have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both, in the past year; * 4 out of every 10 adult women in the City and Borough of Juneau have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime; and * 5 out of every 10 have experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime.
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: Detailed Responses to Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence Questions

      Rosay, André B.; Rivera, Marny; Myrstol, Brad A.; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-04-07)
      This brief paper presents survey questions used in the Alaska Victimization Survey on experience of intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Weighted results of reported victimization by respondents are also given. The Alaska Victimization Survey, designed to establish a baseline for estimates of intimate partner and sexual violence, is modeled after the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: From Research to Policy and Practice

      Rosay, André B.; TePas, Katherine H.; Wood, Darryl S.; Rivera, Marny; Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-11-18)
      The Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage partnered with the Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault to conduct a statewide victimization survey. The Alaska Victimization Survey was modeled after the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System (NISVSS) survey, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with the National Institute of Justice and the Department of Defense. The NISVSS survey is designed to “generate accurate and reliable lifetime and 12-month incidence and prevalence estimates on intimate partner violence (physical aggression, psychological aggression, and sexual violence); sexual violence (unwanted sexual situations, abusive sexual contact, and completed or attempted sex without consent); and stalking” (CDC). This poster presents key results from the Alaska Victimization Survey and identifies how survey results are being used to impact policy and practice.
    • Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 1,281 cases with an assault charge involving domestic violence reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004, and excluded any cases reported to local or municipal departments. * Eighty-two percent of reports were handled by three detachment areas: 32% in C — “ Western Alaska, 29% in D — “ Interior Alaska, and 22% in B — “ Southcentral Alaska. Troopers received 80% of the reports, while 20% were received by Village Police Officers, Village Public Safety Officers, or Tribal Police Officers. Eighty-one percent of the assault charges were in the fourth degree. Eighty-four percent of assaults were reported within 24 hours, and 89% of victims and 81% of suspects were interviewed on the day of the report. * Seventy-six percent of suspects were male and 24% were female. On average, suspects were 33 years old and victims were 32 years old. The majority of assaults in domestic violence incidents (86%) were intra-racial. Fifty-seven percent of suspects and 32% of victims used alcohol. Overall, alcohol was involved in 59% of domestic violence incidents reported to Troopers. * Most assaults in domestic violence incidents (75%) occurred between victims and suspects who were staying or living together. The most common forms of violence (disclosed by victims and documented by officers) included pushing, grabbing, or shoving the victim (in 48% of incidents), punching the victim (in 29%), and slapping or hitting the victim (in 28%). Weapons such as knives or guns were rarely used. The most common injuries included bruising (for 38% of victims), lacerations or bite marks (for 27%), bloody nose or lips (for 10%), and black or swollen eyes (for 10%). Forty-three percent of incidents occurred in the presence of children. * Eighty percent of cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 68% were accepted for prosecution, and 54% resulted in a conviction. Overall conviction rates were slightly lower for female suspects, but conviction rates were generally not affected by victim gender or victim-suspect relationship.
    • Case Attrition of Sexual Violence Offenses: Empirical Findings

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This report examined the legal resolutions for 1,184 contact sexual violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and excluded results from other law enforcement agencies. We determined whether cases were founded with an identifiable suspect, were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, were accepted for prosecution, and if the case resulted in a conviction. We only examined whether any conviction on any charge was obtained. In some cases, the conviction may be for a non-sexual offense. * Seventy-five percent of cases were founded with at least one identifiable suspect, 51% of founded cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 60% of referred cases were accepted for prosecution, and 80% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction on at least one charge. The greatest point of attrition was from the founding to the referral decision. * For the most part, cases of Alaska Native victims were as likely, or even more likely, to be processed by the criminal justice system relative to the cases of non-Native victims. * Cases of sexual violence in the most rural portions of Alaska had an equal or greater chance of being subject to legal sanction when compared with cases from Alaska's less rural areas, and were as likely or more likely to receive full enforcement and prosecution. Unfortunately, the percentage of founded cases that resulted in a conviction never exceeded 30%.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 2004

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; The Alaska Department of Law; The Alaska State Troopers (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008)
      This project examined the characteristics of assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers. Assaults are only one type of criminal offense defined in Alaska statutes as a crime involving domestic violence. This report is not inclusive of all crimes involving domestic violence reported to AST, because it only includes assaults. In addition, this report is not inclusive of assaults in domestic violence incidents that were reported to municipal police departments across Alaska. Only assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to AST are described in this report. The term assault will be used throughout this report to define assault cases that are crimes involving domestic violence incidents; this includes felony and misdemeanor assaults. The sample utilized for this analysis included all assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to AST in 2004. It included information from 1,281 reports on 1,803 assault charges, 1,356 suspects, 1,523 victims, and 1,283 witnesses. This descriptive analysis documents the characteristics of these reports, charges, suspects, victims, witnesses, and legal resolutions.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Sexual Assault Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 2003-2004

      Postle, Greg; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2007)
      This study examines the characteristics of sexual assault and sexual abuse of minor incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers (AST), providing the first statewide overview of such cases. The sample utilized for the analysis included all sexual assault and sexual abuse of minor incidents reported from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2004 and includes information from 989 reports, 1,903 charges, 1,050 suspects, 1,082 victims, and 771 witnesses. The descriptive analysis documents the characteristics of these reports, suspects, victims, incidents, and witnesses, and examines three legal resolutions: whether cases were referred for prosecution, whether cases were accepted for prosecution, and whether cases resulted in a conviction.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Stalking Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 1994-2005

      Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2007-02-01)
      This project examined the characteristics of stalking incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers from 1994 to 2005. It included information from 210 reports, 222 charges, 211 suspects, 216 victims, and 246 witnesses. For those stalking incidents reported from 1999 to 2004, the charges, suspects, victims, witnesses, and legal resolutions are documented.
    • Intimate Partner Violence Against Ahtna (Alaska Native) Women in the Copper River Basin

      Magen, Randy H.; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-07)
      This study examined the frequency, severity, and consequences of intimate partner violence against an availability sample of Athabaskan women (n=91) residing in the interior of Alaska. Data about victimization experiences as well as cultural involvement, residential mobility, living arrangements, social cohesion, alcohol use, and post-traumatic stress were gathered through interviews. Slightly less than two-thirds of respondents (63.7%) reported intimate partner violence victimization at some point in their lifetime. Nearly one out of five women surveyed (17.6%) reported that they had been physically assaulted by an intimate partner in the most recent 12 months. Intimate partner victimization was more prevalant and more frequent when compared to what has been reported by the National Violence Against Women Survey.