• 2014 Alaska Department of Corrections Institutional Population

      University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-06)
      This article looks at highlights from the 2014 Alaska Offender Profile published by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC), with a focus on institutional populations housed both in-state and out-of-state for the period 2005–2014. Institutional populations include pretrial detainees, post-conviction inmates, and probation and/or parole violators housed in a correctional facility. A brief sidebar describes Alaska's unified system of corrections.
    • Alaska Correctional Requirements: A Forecast of Prison Population through the Year 2000

      Barnes, Allan R.; McCleary, Richard (School of Justice & School of Engineering, University of Alaska, Anchorage, 1986-01-03)
      The growth of the Alaska prison inmate population over the past fifteen years has been substantial. According to available statistics there were 482 institutionalized adult prisoners under control of the Alaska Division of Corrections in January 1971; by January 1980 this population had increased to 770 inmates; and between 1980 and 1985, the number of Alaska inmates almost tripled, rising from 770 to 2,073. Accurate forecasts of the future size and makeup of the prison population are needed as a basis for long-range programs and capital planning. This report presents long and short-term forecasts of the Alaska incarcerated prisoner population and bedspace needs of the Alaska Department of Corrections through the year 2000. The forecasts were developed by taking into consideration historical facts and status quo assumptions. Attention is also given to the impact of the 1980 Alaska criminal code revision on unsentenced and sentenced populations. The forecast derived from this study provides evidence of the need for additional institutional capacity in Southcentral Alaska by 1990. Planning should proceed for a capacity of 1,000 beds to be available for use by 1990.
    • Alaska Correctional Requirements: A Forecast of Prison Population through the Year 2000 — Executive Summary

      UAA School of Justice (School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-01-03)
      This Executive Summary presents major findings of the full report on the bedspace needs of the Alaska Department of Corrections as projected by the School of Justice through the year 2000. The forecast derived from this study provides evidence of the need for additional institutional capacity in Southcentral Alaska by 1990. Planning should proceed for a capacity of 1,000 beds to be available for use by 1990.
    • Alaska Criminal Justice Operating Budgets, 2001-2013

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-07)
      This fact sheet presents data on the fiscal year operating budgets enacted by the Alaska Legislature for six key criminal justice agencies from state fiscal years 2001 to 2013. These agencies include the Department of Corrections, Department of Public Safety, Alaska Court System, Division of Juvenile Justice, Criminal Divison of the Department of Law, and Legal and Advocacy Services within the Department of Administration (including the Office of Public Advocacy, the Public Defender Agency, and the Violent Crimes Compensation Board). The budget information presented reflects appropriations rather than actual agency expenditures. Operating budget data was extracted from appropriation bills enacted by the Alaska Legislature and published by the Alaska Office of Management and Budget. The inflation-adjusted data show sizable increases in the amount of funding allocated for each of the six agencies from FY 2001 to FY 2013, but the overall percentage of statewide operating budget funds dedicated to criminal justice remained relatively steady.
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Admissions and Population, 2004–2013

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on admissions to, and confined populations in, the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2004 to 2013, focusing on incarcerated populations and rates, in both in-state and out-of-state facilities, as well as populations and rates in special supervision programs such as Community Residential Centers (CRCs) and electronic monitoring (EM). Data was compiled using the annual DOC Offender Profile publications for 2004 to 2013.
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Institutional Populations, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-09-08)
      This fact sheet presents data on institutional populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) based on their status in the criminal justice system from 2005 to 2014. Probation and parole populations are excluded unless they have violated the terms of their release and been returned to incarceration; individuals on non-criminal holds are also excluded. Data was extracted from the Alaska Corrections Offender Management System (ACOMS).
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Post-conviction Incarcerated Population, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on post-conviction incarcerated populations in both in-state or out-of-state institutions supervised by Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2005–2014. The Fact Sheet focuses on post-conviction incarcerated populations by crime classifications and crime categories overall and within gender. This fact sheet does not include pretrial populations or populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) in non-institutional programs.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 12, No. 4 (Winter 1996)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Schafer, N. E.; Green, Melissa S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-01-01)
      The Winter 1996 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents the first of two articles examining results of the village component of a statewide public safety project conducted by the Justice Center for the Alaska Department of Public Safety, in which researchers interviewed residents and officials of 28 Alaska villages on characteristics, government, and social control in predominately Alaska Native villages. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on the growing U.S. prison population, which increased 8.8 percent between mid-1994 and mid-1995; a sidebar story compares Alaska with states of similar population in an effort to understand the disparity in its rankings, with racial disparities in Alaska's prison population a possible factor. The Justice Center establishes a website.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 13, No. 2 (Summer 1996)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Rieger, Lisa (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-06-01)
      The Summer 1996 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents several articles on legal resources, both criminal and civil, available to Alaskans with low incomes, describing services provided by the Alaska Public Defender's office and Alaska Legal Services Corporation; criteria for determining indigency when assigning public counsel in Alaska; a 1996 amendment to Alaska's Public Defender Act; criminal defense services for low income people throughout the United States; and tort reform efforts in Alaska and nationwide which may result in decreased access to the courts for individuals with low incomes. An additional article describes results of a recidivism study of participants in the Sex Offender Treatment Program at Hiland Mountain Correctional Center from January 1987 to August 1995.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 14, No. 4 (Winter 1998)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-01-01)
      The Winter 1998 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features several articles on juvenile justice, including figures on juvenile arrests in Alaska over from 1987 to 1996, during which the Alaska juvenile arrest rate actually declined; the provisions under Alaska Statutes for juveniles to be waivered into the adult justice system; and procedures and laws regarding the disclosure of records of juvenile offenders in Alaska and nationally. Research on the informal conversational patterns of correctional officers at Spring Creek Correctional Center, a maximum security prison in Seward, Alaska, shows how practices of cultural interpretation common to all work groups may pose particular public relations challenges to correctional officers and those who supervise them.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer 1998)

      Moras, Antonia; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-06-01)
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 15, No. 3 (Fall 1998)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-01)
      A study of Alaska prisoners, described in the Fall 1998 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, finds that long-term inmates in Alaska prisons show evidence of having experienced a high rate of abuse during their childhoods; the study examined the issue of a “cycle of violence” and sought out correlates of abuse which may have an impact on offense patterns or inmate behavior. A Bureau of Justice Statistics report finds that the number of prisoners under the jurisdiction of federal or state correctional systems grew 5.2 percent during 1997. An Alaska Judicial Council study of felony probation revocation cases found that the reasons for revocation of probation status for Alaska Natives did not differ from those underlying revocation for non-Native offenders, but did find some difference by ethnicity for the original conditions of probation.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 15, No. 4 (Winter 1999)

      UAA Justice Center; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-01-01)
      The Winter 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents Alaska and U.S. figures on correctional populations over an eleven-year period from 1988 to 1998, during which time Alaska's prison population grew by 57 percent and its rate of incarceration grew by 18 percent, while the overall state population grew by only 16 percent. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that over 570,000 of the nation's prisoners (51%) reported the use of alcohol or drugs while committing their offense. Uniform Crime Reports statistics show that the overall rate of reported crime in Alaska grew by 7 percent from 1988 through 1997.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 1 (Spring 2000)

      Giblin, Matthew; Atwell, Cassie (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-03-01)
      The Spring 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on drugs and drug abuse, with articles on drug use among Anchorage arrestees, sources of data on illicit drug use, the national drug control budget, drug cases in federal and Alaska courts, substance abuse treatment programs in Alaska correctional institutions, and the increase in correctional populations due to the “war on drugs.”
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 18, No. 1 (Spring 2001)

      UAA Justice Center; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-03-01)
      The Spring 2001 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on hate or bias crimes and existing laws regarding hate crime, both federal and state; hate crime incident reported in Anchorage in 1999; and corrections populations in mid-2000, with the U.S. now incarcerating people at a higher rate than any other country.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 18, No. 3 (Fall 2001)

      Giblin, Matthew; Moras, Antonia; Fishback, Steve (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2001-09-01)
      The Fall 2001 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on drug use among Anchorage arrestees in 2000, a review essay on a recent book on South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the design of the new Anchorage jail, which replaces the old Sixth Avenue Jail.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 18, No. 4 (Winter 2002)

      Carns, Teresa W.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2002-01-01)
      The Winter 2002 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on mental health and the justice system, with two articles about Anchorage Mental Health Court, one of the first four mental health courts in the U.S.; a description of several therapeutic court projects being implemented by the Alaska Court System; and a discussion of the mentally ill in correctional institutions in Alaska and nationwide where, in 2000, one in every eight state prisoners was receiving some mental health therapy or counseling services. An additional article presents figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on justice system expenditures in Alaska and the nation.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 19, No. 2 (Summer 2002)

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2002-06-01)
      The Summer 2002 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on community-oriented policing services-in Alaska, children of incarcerated parents, and correctional populations in 2001.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 21, No. 1 (Spring 2004)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Moras, Antonia; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-02-01)
      The Spring 2004 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on role of alcohol involvement in police patrol work, mentally ill inmates in U.S. and Alaska prisions, the state of state mental health funding to the Alaska Department of Corrections, and measures that can be used in examining effectiveness of alcohol control policies in Alaska.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 2005)

      Rosay, André B.; Riley, John; Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-06-01)
      The Summer 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on homeless youth in Homer, a review essay of a recent book about mass incarceration, an overview of probation and parole in Alaska, and public perceptions of and experiences with Anchorage Police Department.