• Alaska Criminal Justice Operating Budgets, 2001-2013

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-07)
      This fact sheet presents data on the fiscal year operating budgets enacted by the Alaska Legislature for six key criminal justice agencies from state fiscal years 2001 to 2013. These agencies include the Department of Corrections, Department of Public Safety, Alaska Court System, Division of Juvenile Justice, Criminal Divison of the Department of Law, and Legal and Advocacy Services within the Department of Administration (including the Office of Public Advocacy, the Public Defender Agency, and the Violent Crimes Compensation Board). The budget information presented reflects appropriations rather than actual agency expenditures. Operating budget data was extracted from appropriation bills enacted by the Alaska Legislature and published by the Alaska Office of Management and Budget. The inflation-adjusted data show sizable increases in the amount of funding allocated for each of the six agencies from FY 2001 to FY 2013, but the overall percentage of statewide operating budget funds dedicated to criminal justice remained relatively steady.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 10 (November 1978)

      Bruce, Kevin; Lederman, Sema; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-11)
      The November 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads with a description of Project PROSECUTOR (PROSecutor's Enhanced Charging Using Tested Options and Research), a project of the Alaska Department of Law and the UAA Criminal Justice Center to improve prosecutor screening and legal advising to police and to establish a pretrial intervention program. Standing Together Against Rape (STAR), a 24-hour crisis intervention and advocacy service for victims of sexual assault, opened in Anchorage in May 1978. The state of Washington has adopted a sweeping new juvenile justice code, which went into effect July 1, 1978, replacing the original code adopted in 1913. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, the winter 1978–1979 schedule of classes offered by the Justice B.A. program at UAA, announcement of an upcoming police education symposium, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 6 (July 1978)

      Stern, Barry; Cobb, Chris; Robinson, Elliott H.; Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-07)
      In the July 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, the staff counsel of the Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission describes the major provisions of the Revised Alaska Criminal Code as approved by the Alaska Legislature in June 1978, and highlights changes from the draft revised code proposed by the subcommission. The Anchorage Pretrial Intervention Project, which became operational in early 1978, is described. An offender reentry program of the Alaska Division of Corrections to help ex-offenders adjust to life after prison is described. The concluding installment of a six-part series on the law of confessions discusses the use of evidence obtained from defendants which is inadmissible under Miranda guidelines or for other reasons related to violation of defendants' Fifth or Sixth Amendment rights. Additional articles discuss a national survey indicating the need for sex offender treatment programs and a report on more efficient police patrol procedures. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, announcements of upcoming courses and seminars, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 2006)

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-03-01)
      The Spring 2006 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on case processing in sexual assault cases, a review of the report of the Rural Justice and Law Enforcement Commission, and a bibliography of six major commissions which have examined the spectrum of Alaska justice system issues since the early 1990s
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 3 (Fall 2009)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-09-01)
      The Fall 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on violence against women, with articles on legal resolutions and attrition in domestic violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers, recent recommendations from Alaska lawmakers and the Governor on reducing violence in Alaska, and the relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence. An additional article details recent data about leading causes of death for Alaska and the U.S.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 5, No. 3 (Fall 1988)

      Schafer, N. E.; Conn, Stephen; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-09)
      The Fall 1988 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum reports the results of study of the Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) of the Alaska Department of Law, which operated from 1983 to 1986. The PTI program was intended to provide an alternative to full prosecution in cases where the nature of the offense did not appear to warrant such prosecution; the study concludes that the program succeeded according to a number of factors. An article on the policy for Native self-determination in Alaska developed by Congress and the state has sought to replace a tribal model of governance with a body of legislation which confirms land rights without the direct political involvement of Alaska Native villages; however, the author argues, the absence of tribes as formal political structures has contributed to a loss of self-determination among Alaska Natives and to serious negative effects on Native village life. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on a national survey of criminal defense programs for the poor. September 1988 population figures for Alaska Department of Corrections facilities are presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 9, No. 4 (Winter 1993)

      Dellinger, A. B.; Schafer, N. E.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Angell, John E.; Miller, Roger C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1993-01-01)
      The Winter 1993 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum examines evidence from the discontinued Alaska Pretrial Intervention Program (PTI), as a basis for discussing new alternatives to incarceration in a time of crowded prisons and a runaway corrections budget. The Bureau of Justice Statistics describes drug enforcement and treatment methods being used in federal and state prisons in the U.S. Community policing as an alternative to traditional urban policing methods is examined.
    • The Alaska Pretrial Intervention Evaluation Development Project

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-06)
      In 1978 the Alaska Department of Law implemented the Pretrial Intervention Program (PTI) in Anchorage to provide an alternative to formal prosecution of first-time offenders. The program was later expanded to 8 other sites in Alaska. The PTI Evaluation Development Project was initiated in 1982 to develop an evaluation system for the PTI program which would provide information to assist PTI management to set screening and treatment policy, determine staff workloads, and make program modifications. This report details the evaluation system's development. Codebook and SPSS programs included in appendices.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Sexual Assault Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 2003–2004

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-01-29)
      This Powerpoint presentation provides an overview of findings of a statewide study of all sexual assault and sexual abuse of minor incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers (AST) from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2004.
    • Developing Prosecutorial Charging Guidelines: A Case Study

      Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-03-14)
      In July 1975, Alaska's attorney general announced his intention to end plea bargaining by assistant attorneys in all criminal cases involving violations of Alaska criminal law. While the major thrust of this policy change was intended to halt negotiations over sentencing, the policy also dealt — albeit less intensely — with charge bargaining. This paper describes efforts ot the Alaska Department of Law's Criminal Division to enhance the effectiveness of plea bargaining policy through the development of uniform, statewide charging guidelines, including the development of Project PROSECUTOR (PROSecutor Enhanced Charging Using Tested Options and Research), and presents preliminary findings from the project's prosecutorial screening intake component.
    • Evaluation Capacity Building in Pretrial Diversion Services: A Case Study

      Partch, Serena Shores; Edwards, Steven M.; Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-03-27)
      Despite increasing use of adult pretrial diversion programs in recent years, the limited capacity to produce, analyze, and translate evaluation data in pretrial diversion programs has frequently resulted in policy and programmatic decisions being made on the basis of little or no empirical information. This paper presents a case study of the development of an evaluation system for the Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) program of the Alaska Department of Law which can generate timely results for policymaking as well as monitor staff productivity.
    • Evaluation of Pre-Trial Diversion Project, State of Alaska, Department of Law

      Ring, Peter Smith; Bruce, Kevin (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-01)
      In February 1978 the Alaska Department of Law initiated a pilot pretrial intervention (PTI) project in Anchorage directed at first-time property offenders with no history of violence and no current drug or alcohol dependency. The project was aimed at reducing recidivism and costs to the criminal justice system, and included a built-in evaluation component. This report explores the PTI project's impact by (1) comparing PTI clients with other defendants; (2) investigating compliance of PTI clients with contracts to which they agree at time of program entry; (3) comparing costs of PTI compared with those generated in ordinary criminal cases; (4) evaluating the program's administration, identifying its deficiencies, and suggesting improvements; and (5) looking at recidivism rates of PTI clients.
    • Evaluation of the Alaska Pre-Trial Intervention Program

      Schafer, N. E. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988)
      The statewide Pretrial Intervention (PTI) Program of the Alaska Department of Law, begun in 1981, received referrals of accused felons and misdemeanants charged with property crimes or misdemeanor personal crimes. Using data from 1983 to 1986, this study examines extralegal and legal characteristics of PTI clients; analyzies program conditions, compliance, and dispositions; and analyzes achievement of program goals. Criminal histories for 2 to 5 years after intake were used to assess recidivism and recidivist characteristics. Results indicate that PTI operated successfully on a variety of measures throughout its existence. It met intake goals, was available to a broad spectrum of citizens in both urban and rural areas of the state, and two-thirds of clients admitted to the program had no record of subsequent law violations. The program admitted only prosecutable offenders and did not result in netwidening. The program provided alternatives to more severe sanctions for nearly 1,900 Alaskans of all ages, races, and socioeconomic status whose offenses were not violent or of a serious or threatening nature. PTI clients ranged in age from 17 to 66 and included both males and females. Theft, drug burglary/trespass, assault, and minor consuming were the most frequently charged offenses. Of clients, 36.8 percent were felons, and 36.3 percent had prior convictions. During the evaluation period, clients completed 65,302 hours of community service; paid $435,081 in victim restitution; and participated in needed treatment programs, including alcohol, psychological, domestic violence, and career counseling.
    • Interview with Victor C. Krumm

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-10-28)
      Victor C. Krumm, district attorney in Bethel, Alaska from 1976 to 1979, was interviewed on October 28, 1978 about the numerous difficulties in enforcing state liquor laws and local liquor ordinances in Bethel and the villages of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in southwestern Alaska. According to Krumm, the authority villages formerly held to solve their own conflicts was removed due to constitutional rights guarantees, but gaps in the law and insufficient judicial and law enforcement resources in the bush leave villages without the ability to preserve social order.
    • Justice Data Base Directory

      Moras, Antonia; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-09)
      The Justice Data Base Directory, first published in 1988 with new chapters added annually through 1992, presents information about the primary databases maintained by Alaska justice agencies and the procedures to be followed for access to the data. Its availability should substantially reduce the work required to identify the sources of data for research and policy development in law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The 1992 update to the directory adds five chapters, for a total of 27 Alaska agencies whose justice-related data holdings are described: Alaska Court System; Alaska Judicial Council; Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct; Alaska Department of Law; Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) and three agencies under DPS: Alaska Police Standards Council, Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDSA), and Violent Crimes Compensation Board; Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) and Parole Board; four agencies of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services — Bureau of Vital Statistics (Division of Public Health), Epidemiology Section (Division of Public Health), Division of Family and Youth Services, and Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Alaska Public Defender Agency; Office of Public Advocacy (OPA); Alaska Bar Association; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit; Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (Office of the Governor); Alaska Office of the Ombudsman; Alaska Legal Services Corporation; Alaska Public Offices Commission; Alaska State Commission for Human Rights; Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board; Legislative Research Agency; Legislative Affairs Agency; State Archives and Records Management Services (Alaska Department of Education). Fully indexed.
    • Potentially Discriminatory Criminal Justice Agency Policies

      Angell, John E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-11)
      This report describes potential sources of discrimination in the Alaska criminal justice system related to agency policies and procedures. The study relied on policy and procedural manuals and other written materials describing operational practices and organizational and management information about criminal justice operations. The report identifies policy areas in law enforcement, the legal and judicial system , corrections, and systemwide which provide the highest potential for discrimination on the basis of race, sex, economic condition, or other characteristics.
    • Pretrial Intervention and Chronic Offenders

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-10-05)
      The Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) program of the Alaska Department of Law operated in 13 locations throughout the state from 1983 to 1986, when economic pressures resulted in the program's termination. The program was intended to provide an alternative to full prosecution in cases where the offense behavior did not appear to warrant it. This paper analyzes recidivism in the PTI program through examination of chronic offenders, defined as PTI clients who were rearrested for the same charge as that for which they had initially been referred to the program.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the outcomes of sexual assault cases reported to the Anchorage Police Department between January 2000 and December 2003. The data include 1,052 cases involving one suspect and one victim (85% of all reported sexual assaults). Cases and charges were tracked through the Alaska Department of Law to determine what was referred, accepted, and convicted. * Overall, 18% of cases were referred for prosecution. The most common referred charge was a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-nine percent of referred charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 12% of cases were accepted for prosecution. The greatest point of attrition was from report to referral. Once referred, 68% of cases were accepted for prosecution. Sixty-eight percent of charges were accepted by the Department of Law as referred. The most common reasons for not accepting a charge as referred were evidentiary reasons. The most common accepted charge was also a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-five percent of accepted charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 11% of cases resulted in a conviction. Once accepted, 87% of cases resulted in a conviction. Although convictions were common in accepted cases, accepted charges were often dismissed. While 87% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction, 59% of accepted charges were dismissed. Ninety percent of guilty findings were a result of plea bargaining. With plea bargaining, some charges were dismissed but a conviction was still secured. Fifty-six percent of convicted charges were sexual assault charges. The most common convicted charge was for assault, followed by sexual assault in the second degree.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-05)
      The outcomes of sexual assaults involving one suspect and one victim reported to the Anchorage Police Department (APD) in 2000 to 2003 were examined. Overall, 1,235 sexual assaults were reported to APD during this period, of which 1,074 involved one suspect and one victim. Data were collected on 1,052 of these cases to learn how the Alaska Department of Law disposed of these cases. Of the 1,052 cases examined, 188 (17.9%) were referred to the Department of Law, 127 were accepted for prosecution, and 111 resulted in a conviction. Clearly, the point of greatest attrition is from report to referral, with 85.2 percent of reported sexual assaults not being referred for prosecution. However, most offenders whose cases reach prosecutors are held accountable in some degree through the imposition of criminal sanctions.