• Alaska Criminal History Record Information: A White Paper

      Trostle, Lawrence C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-09-26)
      In their Statutory Recommendations submitted in 1989 to the Alaska Department of Public Safety, SEARCH Group, Inc. recommended that the Alaska Public Safety Information Network (APSIN) be expanded to capture and report 18 additional events to improve Alaska criminal history record information (CHRI). This paper examines the viability of including the proposed 18 events in Alaska CHRI, and suggests a distributed data tracking system using the Arrest Tracking Number (ATN) to interface between APSIN and other Alaska justice system databases as the best and most economical means of improving Alaska CHRI. Appendices include the SEARCH report and other information bearing on CHRI standards.
    • Alaska Criminal Justice Operating Budgets, 2001-2013

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-07)
      This fact sheet presents data on the fiscal year operating budgets enacted by the Alaska Legislature for six key criminal justice agencies from state fiscal years 2001 to 2013. These agencies include the Department of Corrections, Department of Public Safety, Alaska Court System, Division of Juvenile Justice, Criminal Divison of the Department of Law, and Legal and Advocacy Services within the Department of Administration (including the Office of Public Advocacy, the Public Defender Agency, and the Violent Crimes Compensation Board). The budget information presented reflects appropriations rather than actual agency expenditures. Operating budget data was extracted from appropriation bills enacted by the Alaska Legislature and published by the Alaska Office of Management and Budget. The inflation-adjusted data show sizable increases in the amount of funding allocated for each of the six agencies from FY 2001 to FY 2013, but the overall percentage of statewide operating budget funds dedicated to criminal justice remained relatively steady.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 3, No. 3 (March 1979)

      Endell, Roger V.; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-03)
      The March 1979 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features the first of two articles reporting on a national symposium on police higher education; the final order of Anchorage Superior Court Judge James K. Singleton in the case of Moseley v. Beirne, a class action suit attacking conditions and overcrowding in the Southcentral Correctional Center Annex (Sixth Avenue Jail) in Anchorage; the appointment of Bill Nix as Commissioner of Public Safety; the appointment of Charles F. Campbell as Director of the Alaska Division of Corrections; and a bill to establish an intermediate court of appeals as proposed by the Alaska Court System. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions, points brought up in criminal appeals cases, and proposed legislation, and the announcement of an upcoming judicial conferences.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 32, No 1. (Spring 2015)

      Rivera, Marny; Sidmore, Patrick; Armstrong, Barbara; Periman, Deborah; Myrstol, Brad A.; Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      The Spring 2015 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and alcohol abuse in adulthood, limiting public access to criminal records, police–public contacts in Anchorage, and officer-involved shootings in Anchorage.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 4 (Spring 2018)  

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Spring 2018 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) as first responders in sexual abuse of a minor and sexual assault cases, findings from the 2014–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands, Alaska's progress on the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative, and a review of a book on the Sequential Intercept Model, which offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system. The Spring 2018 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 36, No. 1 (Fall 2019) 

      Johnson, Ingrid D.; Breager, Randi; TePas, Katherine H.; Randolph, Henry; Dunham, Barbara; Casto, L. Diane; Trujillo, Angelia; Fortson, Ryan; Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      The Alaska Justice Forum has resumed publication with our Fall 2019 issue. In this issue we explore a study of Alaska sexual assault survivor experiences; recent changes to Alaska sex offense law; an innovative academy that trains health care providers to support victims of interpersonal violence; and how legal representation affects custody determinations in divorce cases.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 5, No. 4 (Winter 1989)

      Parry, David L.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Barnes, Allan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-01)
      The Winter 1989 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents the first of two articles analyzing Alaska crime trends from 1963 to 1987 based on Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) data and additional data compiled by the Alaska State Troopers, this article analyzes statewide crime trends from 1963 to 1987. The the National Crime Survey questionnaire has added expanded questions which permit analysis of crime victims' perception of drug and alcohol use by violent offenders; protective actions taken by victims and bystanders; and the response of police and other criminal justice authorities to reported crimes. A study of 1984 Alaska felony cases used 1984 Alaska Offender-Based Transaction Statistics (OBTS) to analyze the process of case attrition and charge change between arrest and initial prosecution. January 1989 population figures for Alaska Department of Corrections facilities are presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 6, No. 1 (Spring 1989) 

      Parry, David L.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-03)
      The Spring 1989 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents the second of two articles analyzing Alaska crime trends; Uniform Crime Reporting data and additional data compiled by the Alaska State Troopers are used to analyze 1963–1987 statewide trends for each of the seven criminal offenses included in the Federal Bureau of Investigation's crime index (arson is not included). The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on federal and state correctional populations at yearend 1988, finding an increase of 7.4% over 1987 figures and a 90% increase from the 1980 prison population. In an exerpt from a longer paper on the problem of providing legal advice to Alaska Native villages, the author argues that villages may gain short-term control over problems such as alcohol and substance abuse through informal “demi-law” approaches, but ultimately they need to challenge the formal laws which block them from exerting local village authority.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 8, No. 2 (Summer 1991)

      Marenin, Otwin; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Barnes, Allan R.; Criminal Justice Statistics Association (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-06-01)
      The Summer 1991 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents data from a study of crime in five unnamed Athabascan villages in central Alaska from 1985 through 1990; extracts from Village Public Safety Officer and Alaska State Trooper reports provide concrete details of individual incidents and a sense of context. The Offender-Based Transaction Statistics (OBTS) program of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which tracks adult offenders from the point of entry into the criminal justice system through final disposition; OBTS data from eight U.S. states, including Alaska, indicate that for every 100 persons arrested for a felony in 1988, 81 were prosecuted, 59 were convicted, 39 were sentenced to incarceration, and 10 were committed to a state prison, usually for more than a year. Key provisions of the federal Violent Crime Control Act of 1991, awaiting final passage, are described.
    • Alaska Sex Offender Recidivism and Case Processing Study: Final Report

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      Part I of this report provides updated estimates of Alaska sex offender recidivism, expanding the post-inarceration follow-up period from two years (as used in previous studies) to seven years in order to better understand sex offender desistance from crime. Study data was obtained from the Alaska Department of Corrections and the Alaska Department of Public Safety. The initial analysis sample included all persons who were convicted of one or more registerable sexual offenses and subsequently released from incarceration between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2008. Of the 433 persons who met this critera, 27 died after release from institutional custody, leaving 406 sex offenders in the final analysis sample. In Part II of this report, data on individuals arrested at least once for the commission of one or more registerable sex offenses from 2008 to 2011 — a total of 1,179 individual suspects — were extracted from the criminal justice data repository maintained by the Alaska Department of Public Safety. This data was analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and completeness of Alaska’s criminal history repository data on sex offenses and to explore the quality of those data for examining case processing of misdemeanor and felony offenses.
    • Career Mobility in Criminal Justice: An Exploratory Study of Alaskan Police and Corrections Executives

      Angell, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-03-08)
      This paper provides exploratory research into the career patterns of Alaska police and correctional executives in order to assess career mobility patterns and the variables which may have had a significant influence on success. Basic data for the paper is from biographical descriptions of 78 people who have served during the past ten years in top executive positions of Alaska's police and correctional agencies, including the commissioner of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, police chiefs of the 25 largest municipal police agencies in Alaska, superintendents of Alaska correctional institutions, and directors and assistant directors within the Alaska Division of Corrections.
    • Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-09-10)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale possession arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug possession arrest rate plateaued be-tween 1998 and 2010, consistently declined from 2010 to 2016, and slightly increased in 2017. The lowest recorded overall drug possession arrest rate was in 1990. Rates increased from 1986 through 1998, then de-clined for all populations from 2010 to 2016. The adult and male populations drive the overall trend in arrest rates, accounting for roughly four out of every five arrestees during this 32-year period. The trend shows less discrepancy in arrest rates be-tween males and females, as well as between adults and juveniles after 2010. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-19)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug possession arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly four out of five drug possession arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years. In 2002, the synthetic narcotics and other non-narcotics possession arrest rates sharply increased for both males and females until the mid-2000s before a sharp decline and subsequent increase. Marijuana possession, the offense with the highest arrest rates, peaked at 90.4 per 100,000 female residents and 324.9 per 100,000 male residents. Synthetic narcotics possession, the offense with the lowest arrest rates, peaked at 13.8 per 100,000 female residents and 29.8 per 100,000 male residents. Narcotics possession is the only offense that peaked before 2000. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-09-10)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug sale and manufacture arrest rate consistently declined between 1997 and 2017. The lowest recorded overall drug sale and manufacture arrest rate was in 2017. While drug sale and manufacture arrest rates for females and juveniles were relatively stable, arrest rates for males and adults showed a pronounced decrease. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-19)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly three-fourths of the total drug sale and manufacture arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years. For all drugs, the difference between female and male arrest rates in 2017 are smaller than in 1986. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Examination of Qualifying Criteria for Selection of Law Enforcement Personnel in Alaska: Final Report

      Johnson, Knowlton W.; Clark-Berry, Chloe (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-10)
      This report examines the "state of the art" in law enforcement selection practices, analyzes personnel selection methods in terms of their ability to evaluate candidate trainability and interpersonal skills in a fair and equitable manner, and offers options for developing a model selection system for the Alaska Department of Public Safety. The report's findings and recommendations are based on an extensive review of the literature; questionnaires and telephone surveys of law enforcement agencies in the U.S.A., Canada, Australia and New Zealand; and telephone conversations with authorities on the subject of police selection.
    • Expungement and Limiting Public Access to Alaska Criminal Case Records in the Digital Age

      Armstrong, Barbara; Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      A criminal record results in a number of different barriers to reentry into the community for former offenders. These barriers — also called collateral consequences — can be mitigated by reducing the extent to which criminal records are visible to employers, landlords, and others. This article provides an overview of the complexity involved in limiting public access to criminal records, processes adopted in other states, and recent legislative proposals and current options in Alaska.
    • Justice Data Base Directory

      Moras, Antonia; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-09)
      The Justice Data Base Directory, first published in 1988 with new chapters added annually through 1992, presents information about the primary databases maintained by Alaska justice agencies and the procedures to be followed for access to the data. Its availability should substantially reduce the work required to identify the sources of data for research and policy development in law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The 1992 update to the directory adds five chapters, for a total of 27 Alaska agencies whose justice-related data holdings are described: Alaska Court System; Alaska Judicial Council; Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct; Alaska Department of Law; Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) and three agencies under DPS: Alaska Police Standards Council, Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDSA), and Violent Crimes Compensation Board; Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) and Parole Board; four agencies of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services — Bureau of Vital Statistics (Division of Public Health), Epidemiology Section (Division of Public Health), Division of Family and Youth Services, and Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Alaska Public Defender Agency; Office of Public Advocacy (OPA); Alaska Bar Association; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit; Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (Office of the Governor); Alaska Office of the Ombudsman; Alaska Legal Services Corporation; Alaska Public Offices Commission; Alaska State Commission for Human Rights; Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board; Legislative Research Agency; Legislative Affairs Agency; State Archives and Records Management Services (Alaska Department of Education). Fully indexed.
    • Law Enforcement Selection Practices in the U.S.A. and Canada

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-04)
      Selection practices in law enforcement have been said to be one of the most complex facets of personnel management. In an effort to document the state of this complexity internationally, the study presented provides state of the art information about police personnel practices in the USA and Canada.
    • Property Crime in Alaska 1985–2017

      Kisarauskas, Yevgenii (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-03-07)
      This fact sheet describes Alaska property crime trends from 1985 through 2017, with a focus on motor vehicle theft rate trends. Overall property crime in Alaska increased by 28.6% from 2011 to 2017. Burglary and larceny theft increased moderately, but motor vehicle theft rates tripled from the lowest recorded rate 2011 to the highest recorded rate in 2017. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.