• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 30, No. 1 (Spring 2013)

      Rosay, André B.; Rivera, Marny; Williams, Dean; Comeau, Carol; Hitchcock, William D.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-03-01)
      The Spring 2013 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum is devoted primarily to issues related to school discipline and the juvenile justice system, and features three articles on "zero tolerance" policies by Dean Williams, who was the Superintendent of the McLaughlin Youth Center; Carol Comeau, who was the Superintendent of the Anchorage School District; and William Hitchcock, who was the Master of the Anchorage Children’s Court. Background is provided through an examination of recent data on juvenile delinquency and school suspensions and expulsions for Alaska. A fifth article describes StepUp, a diversion program for expelled or long-term suspended students which has operated for the past four years in the Anchorage School District. The issue also includes updates on Alaska Victimization Survey data releases, faculty and staff news, and a memorial to retired Justice Center faculty member Dr. Lawrence C. Trostle, who died in May 2013.
    • Courts and Trials: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to seventh-graders, ""Courts and Trials," focuses on the judicial system in America and in Alaska. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as local news articles about Alaska courts and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Early college placement testing: Outcomes and impacts of the Early ACCUPLACER partnership

      DeFeo, Dayna Jean (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-03-31)
      The Early ACCUPLACER Program was administered in partnership between the University of Alaska (UAA) and Anchorage School District (ASD) between 2006 and 2013. Using the UAA placement test (ACCUPLACER) as an instructional tool, the program intended to help students understand the differences between high school graduation requirements and college-level coursework. Test scores were used to advise students to take more rigorous high school curricula so they would be better prepared for the academic expectations of the college environment. In its seven years of operation, the program served thousands of ASD students. This report reviews Early ACCUPLACER test scores and subsequent academic performance for high school juniors and seniors who tested in the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 academic years. The data show that, at the time of testing, many of those high school students’ test scores would place them into developmental classes in college. This analysis was unable to examine high school transcripts to see whether or not students heeded advice to take additional and more rigorous high school courses; however, by following the participants who subsequently attended college in the UA system1, the data show: • Students who participated in the program did not exhibit substantively higher college placement test scores than other incoming students who did not receive the intervention. • Most students who participated in the program performed better on the test at the time of college matriculation than when they took it in high school, but the increases in performance, on average, were not large enough to change their recommended course placements. For approximately a quarter of students, test performance decreased between high school and college. • Upon matriculation, more students needed developmental coursework in math than in English or reading. • Upon attending college, between two-thirds and three-quarters of the Early ACCUPLACER program participants performed well enough in their first year to meet eligibility requirements for federal financial aid. • Persistence rates for Early ACCUPLACER participants were slightly higher than the overall UAA rates; however they were similar to other recent high school graduates, who tend to have higher persistence rates than nontraditional-aged students. The data suggest that the program did not significantly impact the college readiness or later college performance for its participants who later attended UA. However, the data and literature suggest opportunities to use high school-college partnerships as part of a robust outreach agenda. Recommendations include evaluating the relationship between high school course-taking behavior and college readiness, and broadening the definition of “college readiness” to include other attributes known to promote success.
    • Juvenile Problems and the Law: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to eighth-graders, "Juvenile Problems and the Law," focuses on the legal aspects of juvenile delinquency and contains information regarding "helping" agencies. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as Alaska laws and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Law Related Education Project: Final Report

      Balnave, Richard (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08-11)
      This report describes a cooperative project beween Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms. The pilot program was implemented in March through June 1976 in 20 ASD classrooms with approximately 800 children. The curriculum used was the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975), using the units on "Lawmaking" (5th grade), "Youth Attitudes and the Police" (6th grade), "Courts and Trials" (7th grade), and "Juvenile Problems and the Law" (8th grade). Feedback from the pilot program led to the writing of supplementary teacher's manuals for each of the four units, reflecting improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as Alaska laws and community resources. Complete "classroom kits" were deposited in ASD's Instructional Materials Center for continued use by ASD teachers interested in providing legal and justice education to their students.
    • Lawmaking: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to fifth-graders, "Lawmaking," focuses on how our laws are made. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as information about the Alaska Legislature and other legal bodies in Alaska, the steps in the passage of a law in Alaska, and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Hirshberg, Diane; Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-14)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program.
    • Pathways to College Preparatory Advanced Academic Offerings in the Anchorage School District

      Frazier, Rosyland (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-01)
      There are many ways a child in the Anchorage School District (ASD) can access advanced course offerings. To a parent these pathways may seem complex. ASD offers options for gifted and highly gifted students at the elementary and middle school level, and accelerated, and enriched learning opportunities such as honors and advanced placement courses at the secondary level. These opportunities, though linked, are not the same, nor do they necessarily follow from one to another in a straight path. Moreover, pathways to and through these opportunities can be quite different. Offerings are different at the elementary, middle and high school levels, with differing qualifications and eligibility. And, some of the programs are only offered in a few particular schools. This variety provides lots of flexibility. It also creates a complex path of choices and decisions. In all of these pathways and choices, active advocacy by a parent is necessary to ensure that their child receive the best and most appropriate opportunities. In this report we describe the many advanced and accelerated learning opportunities available in Anchorage elementary, middle and high schools, and the ways students can access these opportunities. We provide visuals including figures, tables and text to highlight the pathways to and through advanced offerings from Kindergarten to 12th grade. This document is based upon publicly available information. We have combined information from the ASD gifted program website the ASD High School Handbook, the ASD High School Program of Studies guide, and minutes of the ASD Board meetings. We also spoke with staff in the gifted program at ASD. Individual school-level issues that are outside of ASD policy and procedures have not been included. This report focused on the services, programs and schools within the Anchorage School District that service as pathways to college preparation and advance academic course offerings. As we describe in more detail in this report, there are very different offerings and paths at the elementary, middle and high school. In general, there are gifted and highly gifted programs at the elementary and middle school level, and a highly gifted program at the high school level. At all school levels, the highly gifted programs are offered at a limited number of schools. In high school, all students (including those in the highly gifted program) have the opportunity to take honors and advanced placement classes. Math is not included in the middle and high school gifted program. Math instead is a curriculum progression. Advanced math opportunities usually start in 6th grade, when students can choose placement into math courses that are a higher than the usual level. Opting for advanced math in 6th grade puts a student on track to reach Algebra I in 8th grade and calculus in 12th. At the elementary school level ASD operates gifted programs in all schools and a highly gifted program in one. There are also alternative and optional schools, which offer accelerated and enriched learning environments. If a student is in the highly gifted or gifted program in elementary school, he or she usually transitions to gifted and highly gifted middle school programs. In middle school these programs 3 include gifted language arts and science classes. Students who were not a part of the gifted program in elementary school can access the middle school gifted program, by testing in. Many optional and alternative programs provide enriched and accelerated classes to all students in them. For high school students there is a greater variety of advanced offerings. Starting in 9th grade there are honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, Credit-by-Choice options, and optional programs within the high schools and alternative schools. Students in the middle school gifted and highly gifted program have the opportunity to transition into the high school Highly Gifted Program. The following table provides a look at advanced offerings at different school levels. Each of these offerings is discussed in the report.
    • Sqord and Physical Activity in the Anchorage School District

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-04)
      Sqord is a wearable activity-tracking device made specifically for children. It couples the device with an online platform, where children can set up avatars and challenge one another as well as track their activity levels. Sqord awards points for various activities. Providence Alaska and the Anchorage School District have worked together to provide SQORD to teachers and students. The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) is studying whether using SQORD is helping children become more active. The principal investigator is Mouhcine Guettabi. This presentation is of preliminary findings from the first year of the study.
    • SQORD in ASD: 2 years of evidence

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-31)
    • Youth Attitudes and the Police: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to sixth-graders, ""Youth Attitudes and the Police," focuses on the work and responsibilities of police officers, and their relationships with kids. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as local newspaper stories about police and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.