• The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: Economic Importance, 2004

      Goldsmith, Scott; Hill, Alexandra; Dugan, Darcy (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge contributes to the borough economy primarily through the tourism and seafood industries. The refuge’s lakes, mountains and forests are home to abundant animals, birds, and fish. They provide sport fishing and hunting opportunities as well as a variety of non-consumptive activities such as hiking, rafting and bird watching. The refuge also contains breeding and rearing habitat for substantial salmon populations that support sport fishing both on and off the refuge as well as commercial fishing in Cook Inlet. Three changes in the significance and impact of the refuge emerge in comparing this report with ISER’s previous estimates published in The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: Economic Importance (May, 2000). The most striking is the continued decline in the value of Cook Inlet commercial salmon fisheries. Harvest values since 2000 are among the lowest in the last 30 years. Increased competition keeps prices low enough that even years with good returns have low total harvest values. Employment generated by commercial fishing attributable to the refuge has declined by 40 percent and income by almost 70 percent.
    • Low Cost, Reliable Power: How Does Anchorage Compare?

      Colt, Steve (2005)
      Costs of doing business in Alaska remain generally high, but the low cost and reliability of electric power in Anchorage has been a bright spot on the economic landscape—thanks largely to abundant supplies of natural gas from Cook Inlet and to creation of a unified power grid for the railbelt. This research summary presents data on the changing cost and reliability of electric power from Municipal Light and Power (ML&P)—one of Anchorage’s two electric utilities—from 1960 through 2004. It concludes with a brief discussion of the outlook for the utility, given rising natural gas prices.
    • Tidal Estuary Morphodynamics of the Knik Arm

      Lewis, Steven E. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      A three-dimensional unsteady flow numerical model was developed to study sediment transport due to tidal circulation within Knik Arm, a dynamic well mixed macro-tidal sub-estuary of Cook Inlet in Alaska. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that are creating the Point MacKenzie Shoal, located approximately 4 kilometers south of Port MacKenzie. Hydrodynamic conditions within the estuary are very complex in that ebb-and-flood tides, freshwater mixing, and wetting/drying of tidal mud flats significantly effects sediment transport within the estuary. A Mike 3 numerical model was applied to simulate the sediment transport within the estuary under the action of tidal currents in the vicinity of the shoal. The computational domain of this simulation includes four sediment laden freshwater sources; Matanuska, Knik, Susitna, and Twenty-Mile Rivers as well as an open ocean boundary. The spatial resolution of the triangulated flexible mesh model is 0.00045 degrees2 with a coupled fine resolution model of 0.000045 degrees2. The results of the numerical model are in agreement with previously collected field data. Simulation results indicate the shoal formation is the result of turbid tidal flows and deposition is occurring naturally.