• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 1 (Summer 2017)  

      Rosay, André B.; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      The Summer 2017 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and on the consequences of Alaska's lack of capacity to treat mental illness in the community. An editor's note describes changes to the publication and invites online subscriptions. The Summer 2017 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories, an additional story on a collaborative problem-solving process involving liquor stores in an Anchorage neighborhood and a farewell from André B. Rosay, who served as Justice Center director from 2007 to 2017.
    • Domestic Violence in Alaska: Definitions, Rates in Alaska, Causes and Consequences

      Rivera, Marny (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-03-19)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation describes domestic violence in Alaska, including the definition of domestic violence; an overview of results from the Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) for 2010–2013 for Alaska statewide, the Municipality of Anchorage, and Matanuska-Susitna Borough; comparison of AVS statewide data with national data from the CDC's National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System (NISVS); and discussion of the causes and consequences of domestic violence.
    • Older Women Face Psychological and Physical Abuse

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article examines psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and compares these rates to national rates. Psychological abuse includes expressive aggression by intimate partners and coercive control by intimate partners. Physical abuse includes physical violence by intimate partners. It also includes sexual violence, by both intimate partners and non-intimate partners. Estimates are provided for both psychological and physical abuse. Alaska estimates come from the 2010–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) and national estimates from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Results show that one in nine Alaskan women aged 60 or older (11.5%) experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year. These rates are all significantly higher than national rates.
    • Overview of 'Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations. The briefing was coordinated through the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the Indian Law Resource Center, and the National Congress of American Indians.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-09)
      More than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women and men have experienced violence in their lifetime, and more than one in three experienced violence in the past year, according to a new report from an NIJ-funded study. The study, part of NIJ's research program on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women, looked at how prevalent psychological aggression and physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and sexual violence were among American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. It also examined the perpetrators' race and the impact of the violence.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05)
      This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05-18)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a webinar held at the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center (NIWRC), examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women. Few estimates are available to describe the prevalence of violence experienced by American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) women and men. In addition, these estimates are often based on local rather than national samples. The few available national estimates are often based on very small samples. These small samples do not always accurately represent the AI and AN population in the United States. This study provides the first set of estimates from a national large-scale survey of victimization among self-identified AI and AN men and women on psychological aggression, coercive control and entrapment, physical violence, stalking, and sexual violence, using detailed behaviorally specific questions. These results are expected to raise awareness and understanding of violence experienced by AI and AN people. The webinar also will highlight the need for additional services that are needed for AI and AN victims of crime—a need that has been persistently noted but lacked the research to support efforts to increase resources or allocate them appropriately.