• Alaska's Economic Future: What Role for a North Slope Natural Gas Pipeline?

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011)
      This presentation includes a number of graphical representations of gas and oil production and scenarios for alternative revenue streams.Presented at Public Forum on the Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline.
    • Alaska's Economic Outlook (Alaska House of Representatives)

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019)
      This presentation includes information about employment and income from the Permanent Dividend Fund. Presented at the Alaska House of Representatives.
    • Alaska's Economic outlook (Seattle Chamber of Commerce)

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019)
      This presentation includes information about employment and income from the Permanent Dividend Fund. Presented at the Seattle Chamber of Commerce.
    • Alaska's Economy: The Challenge Ahead (British Petroleum Citizen Action Program)

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012)
    • Alaska's Economy: The Challenge Ahead (Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce)

      Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011
      This presentation includes information about employment and income from the Permanent Dividend Fund. Presented at the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce.
    • COVID-19 and the Anchorage economy

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-06)
    • The Impacts of the “Hunker Down” order in Anchorage

      Berry, Kevin (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-21)
      This brief models the COVID-19 epidemic in Anchorage Alaska to better understand the impact of the Municipality of Anchorage (MOA) “Hunker Down” order and provide insight into the potential benefit of the State of Alaska (SOA) “Stay at Home” order. The economic benefits of the hunker down order are measured in avoided mortality, based on the EPA value of a statistical life of $7.5 million. The benefits are for the epidemic to date based on confirmed cases and a simulation of an Anchorage epidemic based on epidemiological parameters from the scientific literature. Modeling suggests ~5400 deaths were avoided to date. Using a value of a statistical life of $7.5 million, the hunker down order is estimated to have avoided $40.5 billion in mortality due to COVID-19 to date. The economic costs of the shutdown are estimated based on the expected loss of GDP in Alaska, at roughly $4 billion to date. The long run economic costs are not estimated in this report, and will be heavily influenced by efforts by individuals to avoid infection. The estimates of the economic cost are also an upper bound estimate, as many of the costs may have happened regardless of the hunker down order as individuals avoided public spaces to protect themselves.
    • An Introduction to the Economy of Alaska

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012)
      Alaska’s geography—its location, climate, topography, and resources—have driven Alaska’s economy in the past and define and constrain its opportunities for the future. Alaska has abundant natural resources—oil, minerals, forests, fish. In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Alaska’s strategic location has contributed to the role of the military and more recently the international air cargo industry. Another Alaska natural resource--its natural beauty—represents an increasingly important natural resource. But Alaska’s remoteness from major markets, cold climate, mountainous topography, and permafrost make Alaska a costly place to extract resources compared with other parts of the world.