• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 17, No. 2 (Summer 2000)

      Wood, Darryl S.; Araji, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2000-06-01)
      The Summer 2000 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study of officer turnover in Alaska's Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program, a review essay of the book "A Natural History of Rape" by Randy Thornhill and Craig T. Palmer, and national data on rape rates in the U.S. from 1973 to 1999 based on figures from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 21, No. 4 (Winter 2005)

      Roberts, Justin; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-01-01)
      The Winter 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on bush justice in Alaska, with a description of the work of the Alaska Rural Justice and Law Enforcement Commission, a review of past studies on improving public safety in rural areas of the state, and a bibliography of reports relevant to the Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program. An additional article presents figures on the over $62 million in grant funds from the federal Office of Community Policing Services (COPS) received by Alaska police agencies since 1994.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 3 (Fall 2009)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-09-01)
      The Fall 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on violence against women, with articles on legal resolutions and attrition in domestic violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers, recent recommendations from Alaska lawmakers and the Governor on reducing violence in Alaska, and the relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence. An additional article details recent data about leading causes of death for Alaska and the U.S.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 28, No. 2-3 (Summer / Fall 2011)

      Moras, Antonia; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-06-01)
      The Summer/Fall 2011 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on immigration in Alaska, a pilot project for Anchorage probation violators, Alaska's five-year plan for offender reentry, and the impact of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) in violence against women cases.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 3, No. 6 (June 1979)

      Messick, M. James; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-06)
      The June 1979 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features a description of the Alaska Department of Public Safety's restructured Village Police Officer (VPO) program, now renamed the Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program; a discussion of remarks made by Anchorage Superior Court Judge James K. Singleton at a sentencing hearing in regards to sentencing practices in Alaska; and a digest of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions in criminal appeals cases. The Alaska Justice Forum suspended publication with this issue on expiration of its funding grant. (The Alaska Justice Forum resumed publication with Vol. 4, No. 1 in Spring 1987.)
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 8, No. 2 (Summer 1991)

      Marenin, Otwin; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Barnes, Allan R.; Criminal Justice Statistics Association (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-06-01)
      The Summer 1991 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents data from a study of crime in five unnamed Athabascan villages in central Alaska from 1985 through 1990; extracts from Village Public Safety Officer and Alaska State Trooper reports provide concrete details of individual incidents and a sense of context. The Offender-Based Transaction Statistics (OBTS) program of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which tracks adult offenders from the point of entry into the criminal justice system through final disposition; OBTS data from eight U.S. states, including Alaska, indicate that for every 100 persons arrested for a felony in 1988, 81 were prosecuted, 59 were convicted, 39 were sentenced to incarceration, and 10 were committed to a state prison, usually for more than a year. Key provisions of the federal Violent Crime Control Act of 1991, awaiting final passage, are described.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 8, No. 4 (Winter 1992)

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; McShea, Darren; Perras, Russell; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Schafer, N. E.; Tubbs, Michael P.; Rieger, Lisa (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-01-01)
      The Winter 1992 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study on the nonenforcement role of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs), figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on crime victimization experienced by students aged 12 to 19 in U.S. schools, an analysis of residents of a community corrections center in Anchorage, and a summary of findings from the Alaska Sentencing Commissions 1991 annual report.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 9, No. 1 (Spring 1992)

      Trivette, Samuel H.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-03-01)
      The Spring 1992 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study of 67 parole violators who appeared before the Alaska Parole Board in the summer of 1990, figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on prosecutors in state courts in 1990, and a further look at the the nonenforcement role of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs), which was also discussed in the previous (Winter 1992) issue of the Alaska Justice Forum.
    • A Brief Look at VPSOs and Violence against Women Cases

      UAA Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2011-11)
      This study examined sexual assault and sexual abuse of a minor cases that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and assault cases involving domestic violence that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004. All analyses were restricted to cases that included only one victim and only one adult suspect. From Alaska Department of Law records, we examined whether cases were referred for prosecution, whether cases were accepted for prosecution, and whether cases resulted in a conviction. We also examined if these legal resolutions were different when the first responder was a local paraprofessional police officer (i.e., a Village Public Safety Officer, a Village Police Officer, or a Tribal Police Officer). • Overall, local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability of referral for sexual assault cases, had no effect on the probability of referral for sexual abuse of a minor cases, and decreased the probability of referral for assault cases involving domestic violence. (Cases are referred for prosecution by the Alaska State Troopers to the Alaska Department of Law.) • For all three offenses (sexual assault, sexual abuse of a minor, and assault involving domestic violence), local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability that cases would be accepted for prosecution. • Local paraprofessional police did not impact the probability of conviction in sexual assault cases, but significantly increased the probability of conviction in sexual abuse of minor cases and in assault cases involving domestic violence. Cases that resulted in a conviction may have been plea bargained to reduced charges.
    • High Referral Rate for VPSO-Assisted Sex Assault Cases

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      This article reports findings from a recent study examining the impact of Alaska’s Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program on the criminal justice response to sexual abuse of a minor (SAM) and sexual assault (SA) cases closed by the Alaska State Troopers (AST) between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2011 in western Alaska. The study found that the likelihood that a sexual assault or sexual assault of a minor case will be accepted for prosecution in western Alaska is enhanced when VPSOs are first responders. [This article also appeared on p. 1–4 of the Spring 2018 print edition.]