• Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 1: Offenses against the Person

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1977-02)
      The Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 1 is comprised of four articles contained in the Offenses Against the Person chapter of the draft Revised Criminal Code: criminal homicide, assault and related offenses, kidnapping and related offenses; and sexual offenses. Commentary following each article is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include general definitions of terms used throughout the Code, including definitions of the four culpable mental states; derivations of each provision of the Code; existing law that the Code will revise; status of criminal code revision in other U.S. states; and an index to commentary.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 6 (October 1977)

      Carpeneti, Anne; Endell, Roger V.; Ring, Peter Smith; Hutchings, Steve (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-10)
      The lead article of the October 1977 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum describes the provisions of House Bill 549, which would comprehensively revise Alaska's statutes pertaining to drug offenses. Other articles report on the 107th Congress of the American Correctional Association held August 21-25, 1977 in Milwaukee, describes reclassification of crimes of assault under the proposed Revised Alaska Criminal Code, a present the sixth of a six-part series on the history of the law of search and seizure. A justice training calendar is also included.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 10, No. 1 (Spring 1993)

      Dellinger, A. B.; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1993-03-01)
      The Spring 1993 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum compares data on criminal justice processing of Alaska rape cases in1986–1991 with similar data for the violent crimes of homicide, rape, robbery, and assault, finding that the percentage of persons arrested, prosecuted, and brought to trial on the original arrest charge is lowest for rape among the four violent crimes. Other differences between dispositions for persons arrested for rape and those arrested within the other three crime categories are also evident. Reforms in rape laws and effects of those reforms over the past two decades are reviewed. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that there were 883,593 prisoners under state or federal jurisdiction at yearend 1992, an increase of 7.2 percent over 1991 figures.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 11, No. 1 (Spring 1994)

      Carns, Teresa W.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-03-01)
      The Spring 1994 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum summarizes a report prepared for the Alaska Judicial Council which describes existing state criminal justice computer information systems in Alaska and makes recommendations for improved connectivity and coordination between them. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the number of women in state prisons grew 75 percent from 1986 to 1991, with women comprising 5.2 percent of all prisoners (up from 4.7 percent in 1986). Figures on guns and crime nationally and in Alaska are presented based on data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics and the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting system.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 2 (Summer 1999)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-06-01)
      The Summer 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with an article presenting figures on the use of firearms in the commission of violent crimes in Alaska and in the U.S. as a whole from 1980 to 1997. A recent book on the growth of mass incarceration is reviewed. Major findings from an Alaska Judicial Council report on a 15-month pilot probation program for misdemeanor domestic violence offenders in Palmer are summarized.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 25, No. 3 (Fall 2008)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Everett, Ronald S.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-09-01)
      The Fall 2008 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum reports on assaults in domestic violence incidents in Alaska communities served primarily by the Alaska State Troopers; the trajectories of juvenile delinquency careers among youth in Anchorage and Fairbanks; and results of a community survey of residents of Northeast Anchorage on public safety and community satisfaction.
    • Arrests for Violent Crimes in Alaska, 1980-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Department of Public Safety’s annual report Crime in Alaska for the years 1980 through 2012 (the last year for which data are available) on violent crime arrests in Alaska. Crime in Alaska represents the State of Alaska’s contribution to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s national Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program. The UCR program collects data from law enforcement agencies across the United States. (In 2012 more than 18,000 agencies participated in the UCR program.) The UCR includes in its count of arrests all arrests, citations, and summonses for 28 different offenses. Presented here are Alaska arrest data for four offenses known as Part I violent offenses: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter (homicide), forcible rape (rape), robbery, and aggravated assault.
    • Assaults Committed against Alaska Police Officers, 2002–2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-03)
      This fact sheet presents information reported to the Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) by Alaska police agencies on the frequency of assaults committed against police officers for the period 2002–2011. Data were extracted from DPS's annual Uniform Crime Reporting publication Crime in Alaska. Aspects of assaults on police examined include rates of assault, percentage of assaults resulting in injury, weapons used in assaults, and officers killed in the line of duty (1960–2011).
    • Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 1,281 cases with an assault charge involving domestic violence reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004, and excluded any cases reported to local or municipal departments. * Eighty-two percent of reports were handled by three detachment areas: 32% in C — “ Western Alaska, 29% in D — “ Interior Alaska, and 22% in B — “ Southcentral Alaska. Troopers received 80% of the reports, while 20% were received by Village Police Officers, Village Public Safety Officers, or Tribal Police Officers. Eighty-one percent of the assault charges were in the fourth degree. Eighty-four percent of assaults were reported within 24 hours, and 89% of victims and 81% of suspects were interviewed on the day of the report. * Seventy-six percent of suspects were male and 24% were female. On average, suspects were 33 years old and victims were 32 years old. The majority of assaults in domestic violence incidents (86%) were intra-racial. Fifty-seven percent of suspects and 32% of victims used alcohol. Overall, alcohol was involved in 59% of domestic violence incidents reported to Troopers. * Most assaults in domestic violence incidents (75%) occurred between victims and suspects who were staying or living together. The most common forms of violence (disclosed by victims and documented by officers) included pushing, grabbing, or shoving the victim (in 48% of incidents), punching the victim (in 29%), and slapping or hitting the victim (in 28%). Weapons such as knives or guns were rarely used. The most common injuries included bruising (for 38% of victims), lacerations or bite marks (for 27%), bloody nose or lips (for 10%), and black or swollen eyes (for 10%). Forty-three percent of incidents occurred in the presence of children. * Eighty percent of cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 68% were accepted for prosecution, and 54% resulted in a conviction. Overall conviction rates were slightly lower for female suspects, but conviction rates were generally not affected by victim gender or victim-suspect relationship.
    • Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents: Descriptive Statistics and Predictors of Legal Resolutions

      Rivera, Marny (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-03-09)
      This slideshow presents descriptive statistics on all assaults in domestic violence incidents (N=1,281) reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004 that were closed by the time of the study, and describes predictors of prosecution based on the data and correlates of injury and cultural factors in the described incidents.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 2004

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; The Alaska Department of Law; The Alaska State Troopers (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008)
      This project examined the characteristics of assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers. Assaults are only one type of criminal offense defined in Alaska statutes as a crime involving domestic violence. This report is not inclusive of all crimes involving domestic violence reported to AST, because it only includes assaults. In addition, this report is not inclusive of assaults in domestic violence incidents that were reported to municipal police departments across Alaska. Only assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to AST are described in this report. The term assault will be used throughout this report to define assault cases that are crimes involving domestic violence incidents; this includes felony and misdemeanor assaults. The sample utilized for this analysis included all assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to AST in 2004. It included information from 1,281 reports on 1,803 assault charges, 1,356 suspects, 1,523 victims, and 1,283 witnesses. This descriptive analysis documents the characteristics of these reports, charges, suspects, victims, witnesses, and legal resolutions.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1980-2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-01-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the prevalence of murder in the U.S. and Alaska from 1980 to 2011, as well as data on the use of firearms in murders (both for the U.S. as a whole, and Alaska), aggravated assaults (Alaska only), and robberies (Alaska only) over the same period.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1985-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the use of firearms in the commission of three violent crimes — homicide (murder and nonnegligent homicide), robbery, and aggravated assault — in the U.S. and Alaska from 1985 to 2012. Data on the use of knives and other cutting instruments, strong-arm tactics, and other weapons in the commission of these crimes are also presented.
    • Violent Crime Arrests in Alaska

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-01)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1980–2011 on violent crime arrests in Alaska: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Violent Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-20)
      This fact sheet presents data on violent crimes reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Violent crime" is an aggregate category that includes homicide (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault offenses reported to police. From 1986 to 2015, violent crime rates increased in Alaska although the overall crime rate decreased. Homicide and robbery rates declined over the 30-year period, while rape and aggravated assault rates increased from 1986 to 2015 – with aggravated assault acting as the main driver of increases in the violent crime rate over the period. On average, violent crime accounted for 11 percent of all crime reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015. Aggravated assault accounted for nearly three-quarters, robbery for nearly 15 percent, rape for nearly 13 percent, and homicide for just over one percent of all violent crime reported in Alaska over the period.
    • Violent Crimes Compensation Board: Claims, FY 2004–FY 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Violent Crimes Compensation Board (VCCB) on claims made and compensation granted to victims of violent crime for fiscal years 2004–2014. The report presents data on new claims filed, types of crime and types of expenses for which compensation was claimed, and compensation totals. On average, the five most common violent crimes resulting in applications for compensation over the eleven-year period were sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, assault, sexual assault of adults, and homicide.