• Alaska Economic Database: Charting Four Decades of Change

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      This document contains data collated over four decades between 1961 and 1998. Data included in this document relate to employment, Alaska and state gross product, earnings, wages, salaries, labor market, price indices, and other economic indicators considered to be important at the time of collection.
    • Alaska's Unique Economic Structure and Fiscal Challenges

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      This presentation is a part of the series of publications and presentations developed as part of the Understanding Alaska project. It covers topics such as the structure of the economy, recent economic history, population trends, future projections, state and local finances and the economic regions of Alaska. Contains many graphical presentations of data available at the time of publication.
    • Gulf of Alaska Coastal Communities: An Overview

      Hull, Teresa; Larson, Eric (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      The Gulf of Alaska Coastal Communities Coalition is helping Gulf Coast communities find ways to promote development and preserve lifestyles. To assist the Coalition, researchers at the Institute of Social and Economic Research have gathered and organized information for a selection of Gulf Coast communities. The information provides a basis for community residents, the Coalition, Native corporations, regulatory agencies, and others to make decisions about development in these communities. This report summarizes the assembled data and identifies patterns, trends, and significant exceptions in the data. The next section of this report (Part II) provides a broad overview of the entire Gulf Coast. Part III looks in more detail at each region. Part IV contains extensive tables with detailed information for each community. Throughout this report, the footnotes at the bottom of the pages refer to the tables in Part IV with more detailed information.
    • Historical Sketch of Elections for Local Control of Alcohol in Alaska Communities

      Hull, Teresa; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      This document provides tabulated information about elections in Alaska which had an option for Local Option Control of Alcoholic Beverages.
    • Kids Count Alaska 1998-1999

      Dinges, Norman; Lampman, Claudia; Ragan, Shawna (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      How are Alaska’s children doing at the end of the twentieth century? Many are doing just fine—growing up healthy and safe. But others are not so fortunate. They live in poverty; they grow up without their fathers; they drop out of school; they have babies when they are children themselves. Too many—and even one is too many—die accidentally or intentionally. To help Alaska’s children, policymakers and others need reliable information about conditions affecting children. In the past decade or so, scientists have discovered that babies are born with the raw materials for brain development—about 100 million brain cells—but that most brain development happens after birth. What babies see, hear, touch, smell, and taste causes connections to form between brain cells. These connections are the wiring of the brain, allowing children to learn. Overall, scientists point out that we still have much to learn about the brain. But there is strong evidence about both the potential and the vulnerability of young children’s minds. To give children the best chance at life, adults must try to create safe, loving, interesting worlds for them.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2000

      Dinges, Norman; Lampman, Claudia; Ragan, Shawna (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      Children living in small isolated places lead much different lives from those in bigger communities on the road system. Many villages still lack adequate water and sewer systems, and some still rely on honey buckets. In the past 20 years, state and federal agencies have built sanitation systems in many rural places–but it’s an enormous and ongoing job. Part of the problem is that many areas of Alaska require specially adapted systems that are very expensive to build and operate. In this data book, we look at (1) the indicators of children’s well-being the Kids Count program uses nationwide; and (2) other measures that reflect conditions Alaskan children face—and that illustrate the sharp differences among regions of a state twice the size of the original 13 American colonies.