• Alaska Demographic, Economic, and Social Trends

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      This presentation outlines key developments in Alaska's development and potential directions for future development based on demographic, economic and social trends. At statehood the economy was dominated by the federal government, but today, at least in the larger communities, it looks surprisingly like the rest of the US. Booms and busts have and continue to exert a strong influence on the economy, particularly on regional economies, in spite of this maturation. The Petroleum Cycle has been the single most important economic event since statehood. Oil with a market value of about $250 billion has been produced from the NS. Production peaked in the late 1980s and the price peaked at $60 (NS delivered to the lower 48) in the early 1980s. We have had our share of happy events ranging from high oil prices when production was high to a high flying stock market when we had a Permanent Fund to invest, to a powerful congressional delegation when Washington had $$ to distribute. Now that we look more like the rest of the US and economic growth has slowed, we can should take stock of where we are. There are a number of surprises.
    • Alaska Native Population Basics (Presentation)

      Howe, Lance; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This presentation was delivered at the conference on Improving Delivery of Federal Funding for Alaska Tribal Programs in Anchorage on the 5th of May, 2003. It includes charts and graphical information on Alaska Native demographics.
    • Anchorage in the 21st Century: More Diversity, More Complexity, More Challenging (Presentation)

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      This presentation includes charts and graphical information regarding economic, demographic, and social patterns for Alaska, with a focus on Anchorage. Presented at 3rd Anchorage School District Conference on Personalizing Education
    • Kids Count Alaska 2013-2014

      Frazier, Rosyland; Wheeler, John; Spiers, Kent; Kirby, Daniel; Mielke, Meg (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-03-26)
      Kids Count Alaska is part of a nationwide program, sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, to collect and publicize information about children’s health, safety, education, and economic status. We gather information from many sources and present it in one place, to give Alaskans and others a broad picture of how well the state’s children are doing—and provide parents, policymakers, and others with information they need to improve life for children and families. Our goals are: • Distributing information about the status of Alaska’s children • Creating an informed public, motivated to help children • Comparing the status of children in Alaska with that of children nationwide, but also presenting additional indicators relevant for Alaska
    • Older Americans Month (Presentation)

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      This presentation includes charts and graphical information regarding older people in Alaska. Presented at the Anchorage Senior Center.
    • Trends in Alaska's People and Economy

      Martin, Stephanie; Killorin, Mary; Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      This 16 page document outlines expected trends for Alaska's people and economy between 2001 and 2020. It was prepared for the Alaska Humanities Forum in October 2001 under the theme of "Alaska 20/20 Partnership - Bringing Alaskans Together to Chart Our Future".
    • Ventures in Social Media

      Burgert, Lisa; Nann, Alejandra; Sterling, Lorelei (Louisiana Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries, 2014)
      Academic libraries are actively involved in social media platforms as part of their campus communities. They have moved past the debate of whether to participate in social media and are focusing on strategies to develop engaging content and assessment of their efforts. Social media use in the campus classroom continues to grow with more faculty using social media in academic context. Given the widespread adoption of social media on the University of San Diego campus Copley Library formed a Social Media Committee (SMC) to manage the library’s social media presence with a mission to promoting the library’s services and events. After establishing Facebook and Twitter accounts the committee looked to expand their presence on other platforms. To determine which social media platforms undergraduates were using, the committee designed and administered a survey in the fall of 2013. The survey confirmed that USD undergraduates were still using Facebook and showed 56% now use multiple social media sites: Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Instagram. The SMC diversified onto Instagram and Pinterest platforms to interact with students on visual platforms.