• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 1 (January 1978)

      Alaska Judicial Council; Neff, Ben L.; Bardonski, Phyllis; Warden, Arlene; Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-01)
      The January 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with a findings of an Alaska Judicial Council study on domestic violence and the Council's proposal to establish a citizen dispute center in Anchorage for the resolution of domestic disputes where injured parties are unwilling to press criminal charges. Other articles describe an experimental diversion program in Ketchikan for juvenile status offenders intended to minimize the entry of youth into the criminal justice system; a pilot project of the Alaska Judicial Council to involve and inform citizens about the criminal justice system; and the first of a six-part series designed to provide a working knowledge of the basic issues surrounding interrogation and confessions. Also included is a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 10 (November 1978)

      Bruce, Kevin; Lederman, Sema; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-11)
      The November 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads with a description of Project PROSECUTOR (PROSecutor's Enhanced Charging Using Tested Options and Research), a project of the Alaska Department of Law and the UAA Criminal Justice Center to improve prosecutor screening and legal advising to police and to establish a pretrial intervention program. Standing Together Against Rape (STAR), a 24-hour crisis intervention and advocacy service for victims of sexual assault, opened in Anchorage in May 1978. The state of Washington has adopted a sweeping new juvenile justice code, which went into effect July 1, 1978, replacing the original code adopted in 1913. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, the winter 1978–1979 schedule of classes offered by the Justice B.A. program at UAA, announcement of an upcoming police education symposium, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 6 (July 1978)

      Stern, Barry; Cobb, Chris; Robinson, Elliott H.; Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-07)
      In the July 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, the staff counsel of the Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission describes the major provisions of the Revised Alaska Criminal Code as approved by the Alaska Legislature in June 1978, and highlights changes from the draft revised code proposed by the subcommission. The Anchorage Pretrial Intervention Project, which became operational in early 1978, is described. An offender reentry program of the Alaska Division of Corrections to help ex-offenders adjust to life after prison is described. The concluding installment of a six-part series on the law of confessions discusses the use of evidence obtained from defendants which is inadmissible under Miranda guidelines or for other reasons related to violation of defendants' Fifth or Sixth Amendment rights. Additional articles discuss a national survey indicating the need for sex offender treatment programs and a report on more efficient police patrol procedures. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, announcements of upcoming courses and seminars, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 7 (August 1978)

      Ring, Peter Smith; Trivette, Samuel H.; Kowacki, Marian; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-08)
      The August 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum offers a historical and legal primer on the exclusionary rule, which requires the suppression of evidence resulting from unconstitutional searches and seizures. The director of the Alaska Parole Board describes the "parole guidelines model" adopted by the parole board as a method of releasing sentenced offenders on parole. A program to place pre- and post-trial criminal offenders in community-based treatment programs is described. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, the fall 1978 schedule of criminal justice courses offered on University of Alaska campuses, announcements of upcoming seminars and workshops, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 30, No. 1 (Spring 2013)

      Rosay, André B.; Rivera, Marny; Williams, Dean; Comeau, Carol; Hitchcock, William D.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-03-01)
      The Spring 2013 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum is devoted primarily to issues related to school discipline and the juvenile justice system, and features three articles on "zero tolerance" policies by Dean Williams, who was the Superintendent of the McLaughlin Youth Center; Carol Comeau, who was the Superintendent of the Anchorage School District; and William Hitchcock, who was the Master of the Anchorage Children’s Court. Background is provided through an examination of recent data on juvenile delinquency and school suspensions and expulsions for Alaska. A fifth article describes StepUp, a diversion program for expelled or long-term suspended students which has operated for the past four years in the Anchorage School District. The issue also includes updates on Alaska Victimization Survey data releases, faculty and staff news, and a memorial to retired Justice Center faculty member Dr. Lawrence C. Trostle, who died in May 2013.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 4 (Spring 2018)  

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Spring 2018 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) as first responders in sexual abuse of a minor and sexual assault cases, findings from the 2014–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands, Alaska's progress on the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative, and a review of a book on the Sequential Intercept Model, which offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system. The Spring 2018 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 5, No. 3 (Fall 1988)

      Schafer, N. E.; Conn, Stephen; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-09)
      The Fall 1988 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum reports the results of study of the Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) of the Alaska Department of Law, which operated from 1983 to 1986. The PTI program was intended to provide an alternative to full prosecution in cases where the nature of the offense did not appear to warrant such prosecution; the study concludes that the program succeeded according to a number of factors. An article on the policy for Native self-determination in Alaska developed by Congress and the state has sought to replace a tribal model of governance with a body of legislation which confirms land rights without the direct political involvement of Alaska Native villages; however, the author argues, the absence of tribes as formal political structures has contributed to a loss of self-determination among Alaska Natives and to serious negative effects on Native village life. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on a national survey of criminal defense programs for the poor. September 1988 population figures for Alaska Department of Corrections facilities are presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 9, No. 4 (Winter 1993)

      Dellinger, A. B.; Schafer, N. E.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Angell, John E.; Miller, Roger C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1993-01-01)
      The Winter 1993 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum examines evidence from the discontinued Alaska Pretrial Intervention Program (PTI), as a basis for discussing new alternatives to incarceration in a time of crowded prisons and a runaway corrections budget. The Bureau of Justice Statistics describes drug enforcement and treatment methods being used in federal and state prisons in the U.S. Community policing as an alternative to traditional urban policing methods is examined.
    • The Alaska Pretrial Intervention Evaluation Development Project

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-06)
      In 1978 the Alaska Department of Law implemented the Pretrial Intervention Program (PTI) in Anchorage to provide an alternative to formal prosecution of first-time offenders. The program was later expanded to 8 other sites in Alaska. The PTI Evaluation Development Project was initiated in 1982 to develop an evaluation system for the PTI program which would provide information to assist PTI management to set screening and treatment policy, determine staff workloads, and make program modifications. This report details the evaluation system's development. Codebook and SPSS programs included in appendices.
    • Current Issues Regarding Alaska Tribal Court Jurisdiction

      ; Fortson, Ryan (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-12-17)
      This article examines some of the unresolved issues that will shape tribal court jurisdiction in Alaska in coming years.
    • Evaluation Capacity Building in Pretrial Diversion Services: A Case Study

      Partch, Serena Shores; Edwards, Steven M.; Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-03-27)
      Despite increasing use of adult pretrial diversion programs in recent years, the limited capacity to produce, analyze, and translate evaluation data in pretrial diversion programs has frequently resulted in policy and programmatic decisions being made on the basis of little or no empirical information. This paper presents a case study of the development of an evaluation system for the Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) program of the Alaska Department of Law which can generate timely results for policymaking as well as monitor staff productivity.
    • Evaluation of Pre-Trial Diversion Project, State of Alaska, Department of Law

      Ring, Peter Smith; Bruce, Kevin (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-01)
      In February 1978 the Alaska Department of Law initiated a pilot pretrial intervention (PTI) project in Anchorage directed at first-time property offenders with no history of violence and no current drug or alcohol dependency. The project was aimed at reducing recidivism and costs to the criminal justice system, and included a built-in evaluation component. This report explores the PTI project's impact by (1) comparing PTI clients with other defendants; (2) investigating compliance of PTI clients with contracts to which they agree at time of program entry; (3) comparing costs of PTI compared with those generated in ordinary criminal cases; (4) evaluating the program's administration, identifying its deficiencies, and suggesting improvements; and (5) looking at recidivism rates of PTI clients.
    • Evaluation of the Alaska Pre-Trial Intervention Program

      Schafer, N. E. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988)
      The statewide Pretrial Intervention (PTI) Program of the Alaska Department of Law, begun in 1981, received referrals of accused felons and misdemeanants charged with property crimes or misdemeanor personal crimes. Using data from 1983 to 1986, this study examines extralegal and legal characteristics of PTI clients; analyzies program conditions, compliance, and dispositions; and analyzes achievement of program goals. Criminal histories for 2 to 5 years after intake were used to assess recidivism and recidivist characteristics. Results indicate that PTI operated successfully on a variety of measures throughout its existence. It met intake goals, was available to a broad spectrum of citizens in both urban and rural areas of the state, and two-thirds of clients admitted to the program had no record of subsequent law violations. The program admitted only prosecutable offenders and did not result in netwidening. The program provided alternatives to more severe sanctions for nearly 1,900 Alaskans of all ages, races, and socioeconomic status whose offenses were not violent or of a serious or threatening nature. PTI clients ranged in age from 17 to 66 and included both males and females. Theft, drug burglary/trespass, assault, and minor consuming were the most frequently charged offenses. Of clients, 36.8 percent were felons, and 36.3 percent had prior convictions. During the evaluation period, clients completed 65,302 hours of community service; paid $435,081 in victim restitution; and participated in needed treatment programs, including alcohol, psychological, domestic violence, and career counseling.
    • Pretrial Intervention and Chronic Offenders

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-10-05)
      The Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) program of the Alaska Department of Law operated in 13 locations throughout the state from 1983 to 1986, when economic pressures resulted in the program's termination. The program was intended to provide an alternative to full prosecution in cases where the offense behavior did not appear to warrant it. This paper analyzes recidivism in the PTI program through examination of chronic offenders, defined as PTI clients who were rearrested for the same charge as that for which they had initially been referred to the program.
    • Sequential Intercept Model: Framework for a ‘Wicked Problem’

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Sequential Intercept Model offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system and into community-based treatment. This article reviews the 2015 book "The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal Justice" (New York: Oxford University Press), which looks at the success of programs along the intercept continuum. A workshop on the model sponsored by the Alaska Department of Corrections will be held in Anchorage in May 2018.