• Effects of the Chignik Cooperative: What the Permit Holders Say

      Hill, Alexandra; Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      The value to fishermen of the 2002 Alaska salmon harvest was $141 million—less than one-third of the $481 million average value of catches in the first half of the 1990s. Many factors contributed to this decline, including not only competition from farmed salmon, but also lower sockeye salmon harvests, changes in consumer demand, and a worldwide economic slowdown. These changes have created discussions throughout the salmon industry—among fishermen, processors, fishery managers, and government officials—about how to restore profitability to the salmon industry. Part of the discussion has been about options for “restructuring” the management of salmon fisheries to lower costs, increase value, or steer more of the benefits to Alaskans and their communities.
    • Trends in Atlantic Salmon Markets and Implications for Bristol Bay Salmon Markets

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska, 2019)
      World salmon markets are dominated by farmed Atlantic salmon. As farmed salmon production has grown, Bristol Bay sockeye salmon has become an ever-smaller share of world salmon supply. Norway and Chile are by far the largest producers of farmed salmon, followed by the UK and Canada. Historically, year-over-year changes in US monthly imports have been inversely correlated with year-over-year changes in prices. What explains changes over time in the price premium or discount of sockeye relative to competing farmed salmon? Looking at the relationship between price and supply changes, we conclude that the market is able to absorb 6-7% more fish at stable prices. As a consequence, we expect a 5% increase in price is 2019 despite 4% supply growth.