• Alaska's Economy and Housing Market

      Goldsmith, Scott; Berman, Matthew; Huskey, Lee; Leask, Linda; Hull, Teresa (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/1986)
    • Anchorage Community Survey: Residential Stability

      Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-09)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators Series 1, "Anchorage Community Survey," presents a brief descriptive study of residential stability in Anchorage. In the spring of 2003 the Justice Center conducted a telephone survey of randomly selected households in Anchorage to collect information on a variety of topics, including residential stability. In all, more than 1,900 individual respondents 18 years of age or older participated in the survey. To measure residential stability throughout the municipality, respondents were asked by interviewers how long they had lived in their current neighborhood. Answers ranged from 2 weeks to 62 years; the median length of residency was 5 years.
    • Anchorage Housing in 1989

      Leask, Linda; Berman, Matthew; Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-12-01)
    • A College Student's Guide to Landlord/Tenant Relations in Alaska

      Fortson, Ryan (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-01-01)
      This guide for Alaska students preparing to rent an apartment gives answers to essential questions about renting an apartment, tenant rights, and landlord/tenant law in Alaska. The guide, structured in a question and answer format, covers renting an apartment, leases and subleases, living in the apartment, problems with the apartment, landlord powers, evictions, moving out, and public housing. The guide expands upon the "Housing" chapter (https://www.alaskabar.org/servlet/content/entering_the_real_world.html#Housing) for the Alaska Bar Association web publication Alaska Youth Law Guilde: A Handbook for Teens and Young Adults (https://www.alaskabar.org/servlet/content/youth_law_guide.html).
    • Criminogenic Features of Apartment Complexes: Preliminary Findings

      Payne, Troy C.; Scherer, Heidi L.; Eck, John E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-07-19)
      This study used epidemiological methods to compare high crime apartment complexes to low crime apartment complexes along multiple dimensions, including management practices and the immediate spatial context of the complexes.
    • Does Changing Ownership Change Crime? An Analysis of Apartment Ownership and Crime in Cincinnati

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-11-19)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation examines the question of changes in level of crime when ownership of an apartment building changes. Examination of data from Cincinnati, Ohio, shows that ownership change, size of apartment complex, and past crime all have some effect on crime counts. In particular, when the apartments that are sold are high-crime apartments, change in ownership tends to worsen the crime problem.
    • The Future of Disability in Alaska Summit & Follow-up Survey

      Center for Human Development, University of Alaska Anchorage (Center for Human Development, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12)
      The Future of Disability in Alaska Summit was held in Anchorage in the summer of 2013, May 9-10. The purpose was to gather perspectives from a diverse group of stakeholders to inform a vision of the future for people with disabilities in Alaska in five broad topical areas: 1) Housing Arrangements, 2) Advocacy, 3) Relationships, 4) Economic Wellbeing, and 5) Health. About 76 stakeholders participated in the summit including people with disabilities, family members, advocates, service providers, policymakers, and others. A follow-up online survey was conducted to gather information from a broader range of stakeholders and to get a sense of the highest priorities in each area. The purpose of the report and other products coming out of this effort is to inspire stakeholders to periodically reflect, individually and in groups, on how they are working toward the vision in a relevant area and taking action in the context of advocacy, policy/regulation, funding, and services/resources. The report states a vision for each of the five topical areas and includes many suggested strategies to accomplish it.
    • Section 8 Housing & Crime: Screwed or Skewed?

      Gallagher, Kathleen; Payne, Troy C.; Eck, John E.; Frank, James (School of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, 2010-11-18)
      This poster presentation examines the claim that Section 8 tenants in a small midwestern city in Ohio are consuming too many police resources. Based on previous research regarding public housing projects and perceptions of public housing and crime, the city has become concerned that the level of police services that are dedicated to residents with housing vouchers is in excess of the average residential tenant.
    • The Strength of Association: Housing Density and Delinquency

      Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators provides a brief examination of the relationship between housing density and delinquency in the Municipality of Anchorage. A commonly held belief is that crime rates rise as housing density increases, despite only sparse scientific evidence in support of this theory. These data show no relationship between housing density and delinquency at the block group level within the Municipality of Anchorage.