• Assessment of Services Available for Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence in Anchorage, Alaska

      Vadapalli, Diwakar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-09-01)
      The Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) plans to expand services provided under its Flourishing Child initiative, and requested an assessment of service needs for children in the Anchorage area that are exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Specifically, CITC wishes to know if the proposed expansion of Flourishing Child services will satisfy an unmet need in the community. This assessment includes a brief introduction and review of related concepts, and an assessment of services available within the Municipality of Anchorage.
    • Density of Police Calls-for-Service, 2003: Domestic Violence

      Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-11)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators maps the density of Anchorage Police Department calls for service in 2003 for domestic violence in Anchorage.
    • An Examination of Police Service Deployment: Domestic Violence

      Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-07)
      This issue of Anchorage Community Indicators maps the rates by census block area and community council of Anchorage Police Department calls for service in 2003 for domestic violence in Anchorage.
    • Is Race a Factor in Disparate Health Problems Associated with Violence Against Women?

      Rivera, Marny; Garcia, Gabriel (Center for Health Disparities Research School of Community Health Sciences University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 2014-12-01)
      Research studies examining the health correlates of violence against women have consistently demonstrated associations between violence and poor health outcomes, but have not examined a disparate impact on racial minorities. Alaska Victimization Survey data (2010) were used to examine whether a disparate relationship between victimization and health problems exists for minority women relative to White women. The Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) is a cross-sectional survey designed to provide baseline estimates of intimate partner and sexual violence for Alaskan women. Logistic regression was used to assess the odds of experiencing various health problems given race and exposure to violence status while holding age and education constant. This study found that victimization increased the odds of health problems for all women, but significantly more so for minority women. Based on allostatic load theory, minority women who are victims of violence may be more likely to experience poor health outcomes because of the compounding effects of life stressors on neural, endocrine, and immune systems. Policy and practice implications of the study findings suggest preventing and reducing violence against all women, and for informed physicians to screen patients for abuse histories and refer to appropriate counseling and other stress reduction resources.
    • Older Women Face Psychological and Physical Abuse

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article examines psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and compares these rates to national rates. Psychological abuse includes expressive aggression by intimate partners and coercive control by intimate partners. Physical abuse includes physical violence by intimate partners. It also includes sexual violence, by both intimate partners and non-intimate partners. Estimates are provided for both psychological and physical abuse. Alaska estimates come from the 2010–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) and national estimates from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Results show that one in nine Alaskan women aged 60 or older (11.5%) experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year. These rates are all significantly higher than national rates.
    • Overview of Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations.
    • UAA Justice Center's Ongoing DVSA Research

      Rosay, André B.; Myrstol, Brad A.; Blumenstein, Lindsey (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-06-12)
      This Powerpoint presentation describes ongoing research on domestic violence and sexual assault presented to the Alaska Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDVSA) at its June 2017 quarterly meeting. Research discussed includes a recently completed survey on Alaskans’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB) regarding domestic violence and sexual assault; a Results First Initiative cost-benefit analysis of batterer intervention programs; psychological and physical abuse against women 60 and older from the Alaska Victimization Survey (2010-2015) (AVS) with a comparison to national data from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (2010); and an update on the Alaska Victimization Survey.