• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 2005)

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-09-01)
      The Fall 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles about an Alaska Judicial Council evaluation of two new Alaska Court System programs focused on the domestic violence protective order process and results from the Anchorage Community Survey on public attitudes about the justice system.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 4 (Winter 2006)

      Moras, Antonia; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-01-01)
      The Winter 2006 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on language interpretation in the Alaska justice system, results of a Justice Center report on sexual assaults in Anchorage from 2000 through 2003, changes in Alaska justice system operating expenses from FY 1990 to FY 2006, and a brief report on an evaluation of an ankle bracelet alcohol monitoring project in use in Alaska.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 1 (Spring 2009)

      Everett, Ronald S.; Carns, Teresa W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-03-01)
      The Spring 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on Anchorage Wellness Court and other therapeutic jurisprudence and problem-solving courts, justice system operating expenditures, and an update on the work of the Criminal Justice Working Group.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 4 (Winter 2010)

      Periman, Deborah; Rosay, André B.; Begich, Thomas S.; Carns, Teresa W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01-01)
      The Winter 2010 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads off with an article on a recent Ninth Circuit decision holding that a Washington state law denying felons the right to vote is a violation of the Voting Rights Act. Other articles include profiles of correctional populations in Alaska and the U.S., an update on the work of the Criminal Justice Working Group, a pilot program aimed at reducing probation revocations rates, a study of juvenile probation officer workloads, and a discussion of the Language Interpreter Center, which works to provide qualified interpreters in legal, medical, social services, and educational settings statewide.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 27, No. 1 (Spring 2010)

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald S.; Chamard, Sharon; Armstrong, Barbara; Carns, Teresa White (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-03-01)
      The Spring 2010 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on juvenile sex offenders, housing for chronic inebriates, justice projects in Alaska funded through Recovery Act funds, and the Alaska Prisoner Re-entry Task Force.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 28, No. 2-3 (Summer / Fall 2011)

      Moras, Antonia; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-06-01)
      The Summer/Fall 2011 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on immigration in Alaska, a pilot project for Anchorage probation violators, Alaska's five-year plan for offender reentry, and the impact of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) in violence against women cases.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 29, No. 2 (Summer 2012)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Lepage, Cory R.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-06-01)
      The Summer 2012 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on public perceptions of judicial fairness in Alaska criminal courts, an initiative to improve the system of in-state community-based treatment for youth and children with severe emotional disturbances and challenging behaviors, and an update on the work of the Criminal Justice Working Group.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 29, No. 3-4 (Fall 2012 / Winter 2013)

      Jarrett, Brian; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-09-01)
      The Fall 2012/Winter 2013 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on different approaches to mediation, Alaska and U.S. correctional populations in 2011, and an update on the work of the Alaska Prisoner Reentry Task Force.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 30, No. 3-4 (Fall 2013 / Winter 2014)

      Periman, Deborah; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      The Fall 2013/Winter 2014 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on offender reentry and the collateral consequences of criminal conviction, the relationship between unemployment and domestic violence, and prison visitation policies. The issue also includes faculty and staff news, and a memorial to retired Justice Center faculty member Dr. Nancy E. Schafer, who died in September 2013.
    • Alaska Prisoner Reentry Task Force Update

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      The Alaska Prisoner Reentry Task Force, a subcommittee of the Alaska Criminal Justice Working Group (CJWG), focuses on promoting the goal that individuals released from incarceration do not return to custody. This article presents an update on progress on Alaska's Five-Year Prisoner Reentry Strategic Plan, 2011–2016, which was released by Task Force in February 2011.
    • Career Mobility in Criminal Justice: An Exploratory Study of Alaskan Police and Corrections Executives

      Angell, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-03-08)
      This paper provides exploratory research into the career patterns of Alaska police and correctional executives in order to assess career mobility patterns and the variables which may have had a significant influence on success. Basic data for the paper is from biographical descriptions of 78 people who have served during the past ten years in top executive positions of Alaska's police and correctional agencies, including the commissioner of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, police chiefs of the 25 largest municipal police agencies in Alaska, superintendents of Alaska correctional institutions, and directors and assistant directors within the Alaska Division of Corrections.
    • Finland v. the USA: Imprisonment Responses to Crime

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-10-20)
      This manuscript, prepared as a chapter for a prospective book on corrections and punishment in the Scandinavian/Nordic nations of northern Europe, compares Finland with the United States with respect to the imprisonment response to crime, correctional policies, and correctional populations.
    • Justice

      Angell, John E. (Alaska Legislative Council, 1980-01)
      This issue paper, prepared for the Future Frontiers Conference held December 5-8, 1979 in Anchorage to provide guidance to the legislature regarding allocation of North Slope oil revenues, discusses the quality of justice services provided in Alaska and the relative equity in which they are delivered throughout the state and suggests improvements.
    • Justice Data Base Directory

      Moras, Antonia; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-09)
      The Justice Data Base Directory, first published in 1988 with new chapters added annually through 1992, presents information about the primary databases maintained by Alaska justice agencies and the procedures to be followed for access to the data. Its availability should substantially reduce the work required to identify the sources of data for research and policy development in law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The 1992 update to the directory adds five chapters, for a total of 27 Alaska agencies whose justice-related data holdings are described: Alaska Court System; Alaska Judicial Council; Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct; Alaska Department of Law; Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) and three agencies under DPS: Alaska Police Standards Council, Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDSA), and Violent Crimes Compensation Board; Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) and Parole Board; four agencies of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services — Bureau of Vital Statistics (Division of Public Health), Epidemiology Section (Division of Public Health), Division of Family and Youth Services, and Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Alaska Public Defender Agency; Office of Public Advocacy (OPA); Alaska Bar Association; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit; Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (Office of the Governor); Alaska Office of the Ombudsman; Alaska Legal Services Corporation; Alaska Public Offices Commission; Alaska State Commission for Human Rights; Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board; Legislative Research Agency; Legislative Affairs Agency; State Archives and Records Management Services (Alaska Department of Education). Fully indexed.
    • Narrative Report to Law Reform Commission of Australia on Results of Field Trip to the Northern Territory Pursuant to the Reference on Customary Law

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-07)
      This submission to the Law Review Commission of Australia (later the Australian Law Review Commission) makes recommendations regarding to what extent existing courts or Aboriginal communities themselves should be empowered to apply Aboriginal customary law and practices in the trial, punishment, and rehabilitation of Aboriginal offenders. The report is based on field interviews in six Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory of Australia as well police, magistrates, solicitors, legal aid field officers, the Crown Solicitor of the Northern Territory; and community advisors and staff of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs. The report discusses the relationship between indigenous law and the western law system derived from the British common law system as one of legal pluralism — more than on legal process at work in the same environment at the same time — and draws comparisons between legal pluralism as it exists in Australia with the situation in Alaska.
    • Potentially Discriminatory Criminal Justice Agency Policies

      Angell, John E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-11)
      This report describes potential sources of discrimination in the Alaska criminal justice system related to agency policies and procedures. The study relied on policy and procedural manuals and other written materials describing operational practices and organizational and management information about criminal justice operations. The report identifies policy areas in law enforcement, the legal and judicial system , corrections, and systemwide which provide the highest potential for discrimination on the basis of race, sex, economic condition, or other characteristics.
    • The Public's Perspective— Justice Administration 1980: A Survey of Public Opinion

      Havelock, John E.; Ring, Peter Smith; Bruce, Kevin (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-08)
      This public opinion survey was commissioned by the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, to help people interested in justice administration in planning, predicting, and educating with respect to the future design and administration of the justice system in Alaska. The survey was conducted during November and December 1979 and included 676 respondents from throughout Alaska. The survey elicited public opinion in four major areas: (1) the climate of public safety, including perceptions of crime rates, public safety, gun ownership, victimization, and family violence; (2) images of the justice professional, including professional skills, professionalism, educational qualifications, discretionary judgments, and discriminatory practices; (3) changes in the law, including the role of public opinion in revision of law, strictness and leniency of laws, perceptions of revisions (including recent revisions in sentencing, the Alaska criminal code, alcohol regulations, and drug laws), perceptions of laws relating to alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs, criminality of gambling and sex offenses, and election of justice officials; and (4) public attitudes toward selected decisions regarding the administration of justice, including law enforcement and corrections priorities, justice services in rural Alaska, consolidation of public safety services, police use of firearms, sentencing, and public education in justice.
    • The Resilience of Indigenous Law in Alaska and the New States of Africa South of the Sahara

      Opolot, James S. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-03)
      Comparative analysis of not only criminal justice administration, but also efforts to modify existing legal systems, are informative to the extent that they allow readers to broaden their perspectives and to learn lessons from other countries. This paper seeks to elaborate on this statement by comparison of the ways in which customary law in Alaska and the young nations of sub-Saharan Africa has been become living law, that is, law which dominates life itself even though it has not been written into the official law of the state.
    • Senate Bill 64 - Omnibus Crime Bill

      Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-22)
      This brief article describes provisions of SB 64, the omnibus crime bill enacted during the 2013–2014 session of the Alaska Legislature. Sidebar accompanying the article "The Alaska Criminal Justice Commission: A Legislative Call for Action."
    • Short Papers Prepared for the Law Reform Commission While in Australia

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980)
      These four brief papers were submitted for the consideration of the Law Review Commission of Australia (later the Australian Law Review Commission) in its inquiry about whether it would be desirable to apply, either in whole or in part, Aboriginal customary law to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The author presents suggestions and information based on his research on traditional law ways among Alaska Native peoples and the relationship between indigenous law and the western law system in Alaska.