• 2011 Denali National Park and Preserve Visit Characteristics

      Fix, Peter; Ackerman, Andrew; Fay, Ginny (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/13)
    • ACES High or Low? The Impact of a Severance Tax Change on Alaskan Oil Activity

      Tanaka, Audrey; Reimer, Matthew; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-01)
    • ACES vs MAPA (SB21): Revenues and Jobs

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/2014)
    • Bycatch Avoidance Under Amendment 80 in the BSAI Non-Pollock Groundfish Trawl Fishery

      Haynie, Alan; Abbott, Joshua; Reimer, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-05-01)
    • Contribution of Land Conservation and Freshwater Resources to Residential Property Values in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough

      Armagost, Jeffrey; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/1/13)
    • Defining the economic scope for ecosystem-based fishery management

      Reimer, Matthew (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 3/5/2019)
      The emergence of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) has broadened the policy scope of fisheries management by accounting for the biological and ecological connectivity of fisheries. Less attention, however, has been given to the economic connectivity of fisheries. If fishers consider multiple fisheries when deciding where, when, and how much to fish, then management changes in one fishery can generate spillover impacts in other fisheries. Catch-share programs are a popular fisheries management framework that may be particularly prone to generating spillovers given that they typically change fishers� incentives and their subsequent actions. We use data from Alaska fisheries to examine spillovers from each of the main catch-share programs in Alaska. We evaluate changes in participation�a traditional indicator in fisheries economics�in both the catch-share and non�catch-share fisheries. Using network analysis, we also investigate whether catch-share programs change the economic connectivity of fisheries, which can have implications for the socioeconomic resilience and robustness of the ecosystem, and empirically identify the set of fisheries impacted by each Alaska catch-share program. We find that cross-fishery participation spillovers and changes in economic connectivity coincide with some, but not all, catch-share programs. Our findings suggest that economic connectivity and the potential for cross-fishery spillovers deserve serious consideration, especially when designing and evaluating EBFM policies.
    • Economic and Social Impacts of the Copper River Highway Vol. 2. Social Impacts of the Copper River Highway

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1993-06-01)
    • Economic Effects of Climate Change in Alaska

      Berman, Matthew; Schmidt, Jennifer (American Meteorological Society (AMS), 11/27/2018)
      We summarize the potential nature and scope of economic effects of climate change in Alaska that have already occurred and are likely to become manifest over the next 30-50 years. We classified potential effects discussed in the literature into categories according to climate driver, type of environmental service affected, certainty and timing of the effects, and potential magnitude of economic consequences. We then described the nature of important economic effects, and provided estimates of larger, more certain effects for which data were available. Largest economic effects were associated with costs to prevent damage, relocate, and replace infrastructure threatened by permafrost thaw, sea level rise, and coastal erosion. The costs to infrastructure were offset by a large projected reduction in space heating costs attributable to milder winters. Overall, we estimated that five, relatively certain, large effects that could be readily quantified would impose an annual net cost of $340-$700 million, or 0.6 to 1.3 percent of Alaska GDP. This significant, but relatively modest net economic effect for Alaska as a whole obscures large regional disparities, as rural communities face large projected costs while more southerly urban residents experience net gains.
    • Fisheries Law and Enforcement

      Havelock, John E.; Barber, Joe; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-09)
      This text provides a general introduction to the laws, agencies, and issues involved in fisheries regulation, particularly in Alaska, originally intended for an introductory course on regulation as part of an extensive curriculum in fisheries at Kodiak Community College, University of Alaska. The text covers international, federal, and Alaska fisheries law through 1982; the history of fisheries and fisheries law in Alaska; federal, Alaska, and local agencies which affect fisheries; and the justice system, law enforcement practice, and individual rights within the maritime context.
    • Institutional Change, Transactions Costs and Fisheries Reform: Two Illustrations from New Zealand

      Towsend, Ralph (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 10/11/2016)
    • Invasive Species Management Programs in Alaska: A Survey of Statewide Expenditures, 2007 - 11

      Schwoerer, Tobias; Federer, Rebekka; Ferren, Howard II (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/1/2012)
    • Katmai National Park and Preserve Economic Significance Analysis and Model Documentation

      Christense, Neal; Fay, Ginny (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/12)
    • Local Knowledge and Science: Observation of Landscape Change in the Nuiqsut Homelands

      Schmidt, Jennifer; Kofinas, Gary (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/19/2018)
    • Migration and Oil Industry Employment of North Slope Alaska Natives

      Marshall, David (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/1993)
    • Migration and Oil Industry Employment of North Slope Alaska Natives

      Marshall, David (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/1993)
    • Motorized Access and Moose Harvest in Alaska: 25 years in game management unit 20B

      Schmidt, Jennifer (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 9/1/2017)
      Moose hunting is a popular activity in Alaska enjoyed by a wide variety of people. Hunting provides personal satisfaction and cultural identity, as well as food for both urban and rural residents. As the human population grows, All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) technology improves, and development encroaches into currently less accessible areas of Alaska, hunting pressure on moose populations will likely increase. Our current understanding of how increased ATV access may affect harvest is limited. Understanding the relationship between hunter access and harvest is crucial as potential road development to access natural resources around Alaska will increase areas available for ATV access. The area near Fairbanks has seen substantial growth since 1990 both in number of people (77,720 in 1990 and 97,581 in 2010) and in construction of access routes. This research project will examine how much increase in motorized vehicle access over 25 years influenced moose harvest while controlling for other factors such as moose density, topography, and vegetation. The goal is to determine how road and ATV trail access may have influenced moose hunting in Game Management Unit (GMU) 20B, north of the Tanana River near Fairbanks, and to develop a model which could be applied to other areas of Alaska.
    • One Health Economics to confront disease threats

      Berry, Kevin (Oxford University Press, 10/16/2017)
      Global economic impacts of epidemics suggest high return on investment in prevention and One Health capacity. However, such investments remain limited, contributing to persistent endemic diseases and vulnerability to emerging ones. An interdisciplinary workshop explored methods for country-level analysis of added value of One Health approaches to disease control. Key recommendations include: 1. systems thinking to identify risks and mitigation options for decision-making under uncertainty; 2. multisectoral economic impact assessment to identify wider relevance and possible resource-sharing, and 3. consistent integration of environmental considerations. Economic analysis offers a congruent measure of value complementing diverse impact metrics among sectors and contexts.
    • Resource Revenues and Fiscal Sustainability: Lessons of the Alaska Disconnect

      Knapp, Gunnar (International Economic Development Council, 2014-12-01)
      In 1968, the Prudhoe Bay oil field was discovered on Alaska’s North Slope – the largest oil field ever discovered in North America. That discovery led to an economic and fiscal transformation of the young state of Alaska. A 1969 sale of Prudhoe Bay leases brought the state $900 million in one day ($4.9 billion in 2014 dollars) – six times the state’s budget that year of $115 million (Ragsdale, 2008). After the completion of the Trans-Alaska pipeline, oil began flowing from the North Slope – bringing the state very large annual oil revenues. Cumulatively, between 1978 and 2014 the state earned $111 billion in unrestricted general fund oil revenues ($164 billion expressed in 2014 dollars). 1, 2 (See Table 1.) It has not been a smooth ride. Annual state oil revenues have varied widely since North Slope production began, particularly because of changes in oil prices, but also because of changes in oil production, costs of production, and oil tax laws (Figure 1). Soaring oil revenues in the early 1980s were followed by 20 years of decline, including a very sharp drop in 1987 which contributed to a severe recession in Alaska. Rising prices brought soaring revenues again from 2005 to 2012 – followed by another very sharp drop since 2012, with drastically lower oil revenues projected for FY 2015 and FY 2016.
    • Seizing Opportunities for Energy Efficiency: How Are we Doing

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-05-01)