• Alaska Snapshot: What's Happened to the Alaska Economy Since Oil Prices Dropped?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-11-01)
      North Slope oil has paid for most of Alaska state government—and indirectly, a big share of local government—since the 1980s. It’s also been the backbone for much of Alaska’s economic growth over time. But today, a combination of declining oil production and sharply lower oil prices has left the state budget billions of dollars in the red and is reverberating throughout the economy. How has the big drop in oil prices affected the Alaska economy so far? This paper looks at that question, using changes in the number of jobs— statewide, and also by census area and sector—as a gauge. We look specifically at the period from March 2014, when oil prices were over $100 a barrel, through March 2016, when prices had dropped below $40. We use that period because right now reliable employment data are only available through the first quarter of 2016. Also, this is a broad look at job changes, not a detailed analysis of all the specific changes we found.
    • Alaska's $5 Billion Health Care Bill - Who's Paying?

      Goldsmith, Scott; Foster, Mark (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      Spending for health care in Alaska topped $5 billion in 2005. Just how big is $5 billion? It is, for perspective, one-third the value of North Slope oil exports in 2005—a year of high oil prices. It’s nearly one-sixth the value of everything Alaska’s economy produced last year. In 1991, health-care spending in Alaska was about $1.6 billion. Even after we take population growth into account, spending for health care increased 176% per Alaskan in 15 years. These soaring costs are taking a growing share of family and government budgets, increasing labor costs, and putting businesses at a competitive disadvantage.
    • Alaska's Economic Outlook (Alaska House of Representatives)

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019)
      This presentation includes information about employment and income from the Permanent Dividend Fund. Presented at the Alaska House of Representatives.
    • Alaska's Economic outlook (Seattle Chamber of Commerce)

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019)
      This presentation includes information about employment and income from the Permanent Dividend Fund. Presented at the Seattle Chamber of Commerce.
    • Anchorage at 90: Changing Fast, With More to Come

      Goldsmith, Scott; Leask, Linda; Howe, Lance (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      Anchorage began as a boom town, headquarters for construction of the Alaska Railroad. It’s seen many ups and downs since. But after 35 years of growth triggered by oil development—and boosted lately by an infusion of federal money—the city has grown to 277,000 and its economy is bigger, broader, and more dominant statewide. Despite that growth, the city still depends on resource development and state and federal spending (including military spending). It’s still subject to forces beyond its control, chiefly oil prices and production and federal and state policies affecting the flow of money into the economy. As long as Alaska prospers—and that depends a lot on how the state deals with its long-term fiscal problems - Anchorage will prosper.