• Alaska Criminal Code Revision — Tentative Draft, Part 6: Sentencing: Classification of Offenses Chart; Index to Tentative Draft, Parts 1-6

      Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission (Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission, 1978-02)
      The Alaska Criminal Code Revision Commission was established in 1975, and reestablished in June 1976 as a Subcommission of the newly formed Code Commission, with the responsibility to present a comprehensive revision of Alaska’s criminal code for consideration by the Alaska State Legislature. Tentative Draft, Part 6, contains an overview of sentencing in existing Alaska law as of 1978 and the provisions on sentencing and related procedures of the draft Revised Criminal Code, including classification of offenses, probation, fines, restitution, community service, imprisonment, and appeals. Commentary following each article is designed to aid the reader in analyzing the effect of the draft Revised Code on existing law and also provides a section-by-section analysis of each provision of the draft Revised Code. Appendices include definitions, proposed revisions to Title 33 of the Alaska Statutes (parole), a chart of classification of offenses, and an index to the six volumes of the Tentative Draft.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 1, No. 6 (October 1977)

      Carpeneti, Anne; Endell, Roger V.; Ring, Peter Smith; Hutchings, Steve (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-10)
      The lead article of the October 1977 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum describes the provisions of House Bill 549, which would comprehensively revise Alaska's statutes pertaining to drug offenses. Other articles report on the 107th Congress of the American Correctional Association held August 21-25, 1977 in Milwaukee, describes reclassification of crimes of assault under the proposed Revised Alaska Criminal Code, a present the sixth of a six-part series on the history of the law of search and seizure. A justice training calendar is also included.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 7 (August 1978)

      Ring, Peter Smith; Trivette, Samuel H.; Kowacki, Marian; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-08)
      The August 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum offers a historical and legal primer on the exclusionary rule, which requires the suppression of evidence resulting from unconstitutional searches and seizures. The director of the Alaska Parole Board describes the "parole guidelines model" adopted by the parole board as a method of releasing sentenced offenders on parole. A program to place pre- and post-trial criminal offenders in community-based treatment programs is described. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, the fall 1978 schedule of criminal justice courses offered on University of Alaska campuses, announcements of upcoming seminars and workshops, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 21, No. 2 (Summer 2004)

      Riley, John; Myrstol, Brad A.; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-06-01)
      The Summer 2004 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on Alaska justice system expenditures and employment from 1984 to 2001; a review essay about a recent book about the impact of incarceration and reentry on children, families, and communities; a discussion of incarcerated parents in Alaska; results of an Anchorage public survey on legal sanctions for gun crimes; and Alaska laws regarding the loss and restoration of voting rights.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 2005)

      Rosay, André B.; Riley, John; Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-06-01)
      The Summer 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on homeless youth in Homer, a review essay of a recent book about mass incarceration, an overview of probation and parole in Alaska, and public perceptions of and experiences with Anchorage Police Department.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 3, No. 1 (January 1979)

      UAA Criminal Justice Center; Trivette, Samuel H.; Lederman, Sema (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-01)
      The January 1979 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with a summary of Anchorage Superior Court Judge Victor D. Carlson's decision in the case of Sundberg v. State, in which he ruled AS 12.15.080, 'Means to Effect Arrest,' unconstitutional to the extent that it permits a peace officer to use deadly force to apprehend a suspect who is not a threat to anyone's life. Carlson declared Russel Sundberg's arrest for burglary unlawful due to use of excessive force and suppressed the evidence resulting from the arrest. The executive director of the Alaska Parole Board describes the importance of parole guidelines in light of the provision for such guidelines in the newly enacted Revised Alaska Criminal Code (effective January 1, 1980). A a new program in Anchorage for the prevention and prosecution of bad check writers is described. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 4, No. 1 (Spring 1987)

      Angell, John E.; Endell, Roger V.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1987-03)
      The Alaska Justice Forum has resumed publication after a seven-year hiatus. The original Forum was published from 1977 to 1980. The Spring 1987 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on the implementation of Offender-Based State Correctional Information System (OBSCIS) by the Alaska Department of Corrections; a Bureau of Justice Statistics study estimating the likelihood of imprisonment for persons arrested for robbery, burglary, or theft in the U.S., Canada, England, and West Germany; and preliminary results of a study assessing the impact on Alaska of participation in the Interstate Compact for Probation and Parole; and results of a public opinion poll showing that a majority of Anchorage and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough residents oppose selection of Fire Island as a site for a long-term correctional facility. Briefer items address the appointment by Governor Steve Cowper of a committee to coordinate Alaska's implementation of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 and two new Alaska Judicial Council research reports. March 1987 population figures for Alaska Department of Corrections facilities are presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 6, No. 4 (Winter 1990)

      Schafer, N. E.; Read, Emily E.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Copus, Gary D.; Holmes, Caralyn (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1990-01)
      The Winter 1990 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum examines the criminal activity of Alaska women by analyzing Uniform Crime Reporting arrest data for 1975–1984. Women do not contribute substantially to the overall rate of violent crime in Alaska, but arrests of female offenders, both adult and juvenile, comprise a substantial proportion of all arrests for alcohol-related offenses. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on adults on federal and state probation and parole in 1988. Analysis of 1988 data on reported crime incidents from seven villages in the North Slope Borough suggests that crime rates for certain offenses may be higher in rural Alaska than in urban Alaska. January 1990 population figures for Alaska Department of Corrections facilities are presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 9, No. 1 (Spring 1992)

      Trivette, Samuel H.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-03-01)
      The Spring 1992 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features findings from a study of 67 parole violators who appeared before the Alaska Parole Board in the summer of 1990, figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics on prosecutors in state courts in 1990, and a further look at the the nonenforcement role of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs), which was also discussed in the previous (Winter 1992) issue of the Alaska Justice Forum.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 9, No. 3 (Fall 1992)

      Schafer, N. E.; Green, Melissa S.; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-09-01)
      The Fall 1992 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents population figures for prisoners, probationers, parolees, and community corrections residents under jurisdiction of the Alaska Department of Corrections from February 1980 to September 1992. The Bureau of Justice Statistics examines characteristics of persons in local jails arrested or convicted of driving while intoxicated (DWI), finding that more than half the persons in local jails charged with DWI in 1989 had prior sentences to incarceration for DWI offenses. Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) statistics from the FBI for the first six months of 1992 show a three percent increase in violent crime and three percent decrease in property crime nationwide compared with the same period for 1991.
    • Alaska Offender Profile: Adult Probation/Parole, 2002–2012

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-06)
      This fact sheet presents data on characteristics of offenders under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) for the period 2002–2012, and briefly describes how probation and parole operate in Alaska. Data were extracted from the annual Offender Profile publication of the Alaska Department of Corrections. Data presented include total numbers of adult probationers and parolees, rates of adult probation/parole supervision, percentage breakdowns of the probation/parole population by sex and race, and distribution of probation/parole cases among the three largest DOC-PP offices. There has been a notable increase in the total number of persons subject to probation/parole supervision in Alaska over the 11-year period, but this increase has not outpaced the state’s population growth.
    • Alaska's Participation in the Interstate Compact for Probation and Parole

      Schafer, N. E.; Wenderoff, Leslie; Mirc, Peter (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1987)
      The Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Parolees and Probationers is an agreement whereby one state agrees to provide supervision for offenders on community release from other states. Participants in the interstate compact agree that any state will accept supervision of a parolee or probationer providing the offender has proper residence either as a resident of that state or with family, and that he/she is able to find employment. Major increases in Alaska's prison population over the past decade have been accompanied by corresponding increases in the number of persons under probation/parole supervision and in the caseloads of individual probation officers. Using a master listing of all persons under the jurisdiction of the Alaska Department of Corrections from 1976 to 1983, the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage made a preliminary assessment of the impact on Alaska of participation in the Interstate Compact. From 1976 to 1983, Alaska processed 1,551 offenders through the Interstate Compact, of whom 999 were received for supervision from other states (64.4% of the total) and 552 (35.6%) were sent to other states. Based on this data, the interstate compact has not yet been an equitable arrangement for any city in Alaska: each city has seen a greater number of incoming than of outgoing transfers.
    • Centralization to Consolidation: Some Historical Antecedents of Unified Correctional Systems

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1995-10)
      Autonomous prisons in the nineteenth century were often inefficient and highly political. Many state legislatures and governors attempted to move toward centralized control of their state facilities. In the twentieth century the Federal Bureau of Prisons was seen by the Wickersham Commission as a model for institutional centralization. Consolidation of all correctional services was recommended by the National Advisory Commission in 1973. Today only a few states – Alaska, Delaware, Rhode Island, and Vermont – have fully unified adult correctional systems; each is described.
    • Equitable over Time? — Evaluating the 'Costs' of Interstate Compact Participation

      Schafer, N. E.; Wenderoff, Leslie (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-10)
      The Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Parolees and Probationers (ICSPP) provides for the supervision of offenders in states other than those in which they were sentenced. It is assumed that the number of offenders entering a state for supervision is, over time, approximately equal to the number leaving for supervision elsewhere. Thus the net "cost" to the state would, over time, be zero. Data on Alaska's participation in the Interstate Compact formed the impetus for a study of Interstate Compact clients processed through the Anchorage probation office. This study suggests that numbers should not be the only measure of cost: demographic and offense characteristics of clients, as well as their supervision needs, should be factored into any cost assessment.
    • Exploring the Link between Visits and Parole Success: A Survey of Prison Visitors [manuscript]

      Schafer, N. E. (Exploring the Link between Visits and Parole Success: A Survey of Prison Visitors [manuscript], 1992-08-13)
      An exploratory survey of visitors to two men's prisons finds that the visitors differ in some significant ways from prisoners' families previously described in the literature. The results raise some questions about the correlation that has been established between visits and post-release success and provoke suggestions for in-depth research into visitor/prisoner relationships.
    • Parole and Probation in Alaska, 2002–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-05)
      This fact sheet presents data on the characteristics of offenders who came under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) between 2002 and 2016. Probation and parole offender data are from the Alaska Department of Corrections’ annual Offender Profile publication. Overall trends saw numbers of probationers and parolees increasing from 2002 to 2012, then decreasing through 2016. The majority of probationers and parolees are between 20 and 34 years old. The trend for both males and females followed the overall trend, increasing from 2002 to 2012 then decreasing. On average, from 2002 to 2016, Alaska Natives were 26.7% of the probation and parole population, Asian & or Pacific Islander 4.1%, Black 8.7%, and White 56.1%.
    • A Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Alaska of Participation in the Interstate Compact

      Schafer, N. E.; Wenderoff, Leslie (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1986-10)
      The Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Parolees and Probationers is an agreement whereby one state agrees to provide supervision for offenders on community release from other states. Participants in the interstate compact agree that any state will accept supervision of a parolee or probationer providing the offender has proper residence either as a resident of that state or with family, and that he/she is able to find employment. Major increases in Alaska's prison population over the past decade have been accompanied by corresponding increases in the number of persons under probation/parole supervision and in the caseloads of individual probation officers. Using a master listing of all persons under the jurisdiction of the Alaska Department of Corrections from 1976 to 1983, the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage made a preliminary assessment of the impact on Alaska of participation in the Interstate Compact. From 1976 to 1983, Alaska processed 1,551 offenders through the Interstate Compact, of whom 999 were received for supervision from other states (64.4% of the total) and 552 (35.6%) were sent to other states. Based on this data, the interstate compact has not yet been an equitable arrangement for any city in Alaska: each city has seen a greater number of incoming than of outgoing transfers.
    • Prison Visiting Policies and Practices [manuscript]

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1991-01)
      Based on empirical evidence that visiting is significantly related to parole success, correctional administrators have begun to view family visits as one component of the rehabilitation process. Several authorities have encouraged correctional institutions to maximize visiting opportunities. Previous studies have noted geographical and architectural limits to such maximization. This paper reports the results of a national survey of visiting policies and draws comparisons with surveys reported in 1978 and 1954 to determine the extent to which prisons have increased efforts to make visiting a priority.
    • Prison Visiting Policies and Practices [paper]

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1987-10)
      Based on empirical evidence that visiting is significantly related to parole success, several authorities have encouraged correctional institutions to maximize visiting opportunities. Previous studies have noted geographical and architectural limits to such maximization. A decade of prison construction should have improved visiting opportunities. This paper reports the results of a national survey of visiting policies and draws comparisons with surveys reported in 1978 and 1954.
    • Prison Visiting: Is It Time to Review the Rules? [manuscript]

      Schafer, N. E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1989-06-09)
      Visiting rules and regulations from 71 long-term adult correctional facilities from 31 states were collected and reviewed. Most of the rules cover five distinct areas: visitor application, visitor processing, contraband, conduct, and dress codes. The rules are described and discussed in light of recent standards which stress the importance of encouraging visitors. Suggestions and recommendations are included.