• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 32, No. 4 (Winter 2016)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      The Winter 2016 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on approaches to evidence-based criminal justice reform and recidivism reduction in Alaska, and an initiatve to make Alaska and national public health data available online.
    • The Anchorage Community Survey, 2005: Sourcebook

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-05-06)
      A randomly selected sample of 2,485 adult residents of the Municipality of Anchorage participated in a telephone survey conducted by the Justice Center over a five-month period in late 2004 and early 2005. The results, compiled in this sourcebook, provide one of the most detailed pictures available of community attitudes within the network of communities forming the Anchorage municipality, containing information on the demographics of residents, their perceptions of the social cohesion in their community, and their satisfaction with various municipal and government functions, including policing. These survey results are organized by demographic measures and by community council area.
    • The Anchorage Community Survey, 2007: Sourcebook

      Flexman-Evans, Shel Llee (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-09-23)
      A sample of 1,772 adult residents of the Municipality of Anchorage participated in a survey conducted by the Justice Center in late 2007. The results, compiled in this sourcebook — the second in a series of biannual surveys of the Anchorage municipality — provide one of the most detailed pictures available of community attitudes within the network of communities forming the Anchorage municipality, containing information on the demographics of residents, their perceptions of the life in their neighborhoods, social activities and organizations, and their satisfaction with various municipal and government functions, including policing. Survey results are presented in summary form for the entire municipality and also by community council area.
    • Baseline Assessment: Alaska's Capacity and Infrastructure for Prescription Opioid Misuse Prevention

      Elkins, Amanda (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-08-01)
    • Baseline Opioid Survey: Access, Consumption, Consequences, and Perceptions among Young Adults in Alaska

      Barnett, Jodi (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
    • Culturally-Relevant Online Education Improves Health Workers' Capacity and Intent to Address Cancer

      Cueva, Katie; Dignan, Mark; Revels, Laura; Cueva, Melanie (Springer, 2018-01-24)
    • Determinants of Obesity in Latinos in Anchorage Alaska

      Appa, Andrea (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-12-01)
      Determinants of obesity can be complex and group specific. There is limited data about the Latino population and the health needs of Latinos in the state of Alaska. The goal of this project was to better understand the determinants of obesity in Latinos, including the impact of dietary choices, financial status, mental health, and exercising in the levels of obesity of Latinos. The investigator used Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to study the association of several variables in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). After data exploration, univariate analysis and logistical regression were conducted for selected variables related to the causes of obesity in Latinos living in the state of Alaska where the investigator observed higher percentages of obesity in Latinos as compared to other groups. However, results were not statistically significant except for the higher percentages with high blood pressure in obese Latinos when compared to non-obese Latinos and other groups. The results produced by this study are evidence that further research is needed to determine the impact of obesity in Latinos and their differences with other groups.
    • Development of a Crystalline Silica Management Plan for a Coal-Fired Power Plant

      Martinson, Tracey A. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      Respirable crystalline silica is a serious occupational health hazard. Exposure can result in the development of silicosis, lung cancer, renal disease, and autoimmune disease. Development of silica-related diseases may take 5-40 years, and there is no cure. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recognizes the health burden placed on workers exposed to respirable crystalline silica, and has promulgated a regulatory standard that will protect these workers to a greater extent than in the past. The standard mandates that businesses implement exposure monitoring, engineering and work practice controls to reduce exposures, and training and medical surveillance for employees exposed at the action level (AL) for more than 30 days per year. For this project, a brief epidemiological and knowledge assessment of employees was conducted and initial exposure monitoring for workers was performed. Based on the results, recommendations on work practice controls to reduce exposures were made. To comply with the new OSHA standard, a training program for employees was developed, and requirements for medical surveillance were outlined. The results of this work were used to develop a comprehensive Respirable Crystalline Silica Management Plan for the Golden Valley Electric Association power plant located in Healy, Alaska.
    • The Effect of Cultural Beliefs and Customs on Nutritional Attitudes and Food Choices of Asian Populations Living With Chronic Diseases in the Anchorage Metropolitan Area

      Armour, Alison (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      A chronic disease is a non-infectious, gradually occurring illness that worsens and lasts over a lengthy period (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). According to the WHO, the number of individuals with chronic disease is increasing worldwide. The rise in numbers is especially dramatic in Asian populations as they make the transition from traditional to Western diets. Studies have shown that chronic disease can be prevented or managed by rejecting the Western diet of processed, refined, high fat foods and adopting a healthier diet. However, little is known about the effect of culture and customs on attitudes towards nutrition. This study explored their influence on the nutritional status and food choices of Anchorage-area Asian adults living with chronic disease. A purposive sample of Asian adults with chronic disease was recruited, a series of focus group meetings were held over a month-long period, and participants were asked questions related to nutrition and culture. Themes were identified and analyzed using the PEN-3 theoretical model and quality of analysis was addressed by following the process proposed by Lincoln and Gruba. Findings indicate that participants in general recognized the benefits of improved nutrition in the management of their chronic disease but had insufficient knowledge or perceived lack of support to make the necessary changes.
    • Experiences of Opioid Use Initiation and Progression among Alaskans who Use Heroin

      Barnett, Jodi; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, 2018)
      The opioid epidemic has continued in Alaska and nationwide. Information about the types of opioids that are misused first, the age of first use, and the circumstances and mode of initial and progressive use of opioids can help to inform effective prevention and early intervention efforts. These topics were explored during interviews with adults in Alaska who use heroin for the Partnerships for Success project. Results indicate that most participants were exposed to opioids through a legitimate prescription in their teens to early twenties for a severe injury or multiple surgeries before developing an addiction. Some obtained prescription opioids for misuse initially from social sources such as a friend, at a party, or stealing them from a neighbor. Only two participants began their use of opioids with heroin. All participants eventually went on to use heroin which became cheaper, more effective, and easier to obtain than prescription opioids. Few participants indicated that social influences, rather than price or availability, were a factor in their transition to heroin. Recommendations and an overview of recent state prevention initiatives and policy efforts related to the findings are presented.
    • Informed Alaskans Initiative: Public Health Data in Alaska

      Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This article describes the national and state public health data made available online through the Alaska Division of Public Health's Informed Alaskans Initiative.
    • Preventive Screenings Gap Analysis

      Frazier, Rosyland; Guettabi, Mouhcine; Wheeler, John; Cueva, Katie (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-10-01)
    • Public Health Research in Alaska: Applying Quality Research and Evaluation to Alaska's Public Health Challenges

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-01-01)
    • Vaccination Hesitation: Investigation Why Parents Decline Pediatric Influenza Vaccines in Juneau, Alaska

      Leder, Lindsey (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-14)
      The influenza virus is responsible for hundreds of childhood deaths and costs the health care system millions of dollars each year (Hassan, Lewis, Davis, Gebremariam, and Dombkowski, 2009). The influenza vaccine is the most effective intervention for prevention of pediatric influenza, yet many parents decline this vaccine for their children. Studies completed in various geographic locations cite different factors influencing parents who decline pediatric vaccinations. Alaska has the second lowest rate of influenza vaccination in the country (Center for Disease Control [CDC], 2012). The purpose of this project was to understand the factors that influence parental decision to refuse influenza vaccination in Juneau, Alaska. A modified version of the Childhood Influenza Immunization Questionnaire, an instrument based on the Health Belief Model, was utilized to collect data from a convenience sample of parents at a private pediatric practice in Juneau, AK. Statistical analysis revealed the only significant influencing factor on parents’ decisions on whether to vaccinate against influenza was their perception of vaccine risk (p < .001). Information obtained from this study will be used to educate local providers in the community with the goal of enabling said providers to overcome resistance to vaccination hesitancy based on parent perceptions.
    • What role can regional economics plan in addressing health questions?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-01-01)