• How to Prolong the Career Life of a Practicing Physician: Assessing the Causes and Extent of Physician Burnout in a Primary Care Setting

      Tsigonis, Jean M. W. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-05-01)
      Physicians report widespread burnout and job dissatisfaction. Institutional and personal changes are necessary for meaningful work and restoration of the joy of the practice of medicine. This practicum project conducted a survey to assess the causes and extent of physician burnout at Tanana Valley Clinic (TVC). The Areas of Worklife Survey-Maslach Burnout Inventory (AWS-MBI) was used to gather data on the causes and extent of physician burnout. Analysis of the AWS-MBI survey data produced by Mind Garden was done by the principal investigator. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) assesses the extent of physician burnout. The Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS) reveals causes of burnout and enables directed interventions to help decrease the physician burnout. The data indicate that burnout does exist in two of the three areas of burnout assessed: emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Specific areas in the worklife were identified that cause burnout: workload, control, fairness and value. Suggestion for future direction includes interventions, analysis of those interventions, and an evaluation plan.
    • Indigenous social and economic adaptations in northern Alaska as measures of resilience

      Martin, Stephanie (Resilience Alliance, 2014-12-01)
      I explored one aspect of social-ecological change in the context of an Alaskan human-Rangifer system, with the goal of understanding household adaptive responses to perturbations when there are multiple forces of change at play. I focused on households as one element of social resilience. Resilience is in the context of transition theory, in which communities are continually in a process of change, and perturbations are key points in the transition process. This case study of Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska, USA, contributes to the understanding of cultural continuity and household resilience in times of rapid change by using household survey data from 1978 to 2003 to understand how households adapted to changes in the cash economy that came with oil development at the same time as a crash in the caribou population and state-imposed limits on caribou harvests. The research illustrates that households are resilient in the way they capture opportunities and create a new system so that elements of the old remain while parts change.