• An Assessment of Safety Belt Use In Alaska - 1992

      Kruse, Jack; Hanna, Virgene (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1992)
      During the summer of 1992, over 24,000 vehicles were observed in a survey of seatbelt use. Information on these vehicles, the driver, and the outboard passenger was recorded and analyzed. Of the passenger cars in the sample area, covering 85 percent of the state's population, 62 percent of the drivers and 57 percent of the outboard passengers were observed to be wearing seatbelts. Cars in which both the driver and passenger in the same car were belted were observed 55 percent of the time. Of all the drivers and all the passengers observed, 66 percent were buckled. Drivers and outboard passengers of pickup trucks and recreational vehicles were much less likely to be wearing their seatbelts. The same techniques used for observing vehicles were used for observing motorcycles. Areawide, 51 percent of the drivers of motorcycles were wearing helmets. It is important to note that survey results pertain to the driver and outboard passenger in a probability sample of vehicles drawn from the most settled areas of Alaska. Included in this area are the Municipality of Anchorage, the MatanuskaSusitna Borough, the Juneau Borough, the Kenai Peninsula Borough, and the Fairbanks North Star Borough.
    • An Assessment of Safety Belt Use In Alaska - 1999

      Hanna, Virgene (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      During July , August, and early September of 1999, safety restraint use by both the driver, and the outboard passenger in passenger cars and trucks was recorded and analyzed. In the sample area, covering 85 percent of the state's population, 64 percent of vehicles had either the driver or the passenger or both wearing a restraint. This compares with 63 percent in 1998. Of all the drivers and all the passengers observed, 61 percent of drivers and 60 percent of all outboard passengers were wearing seatbelts. This Drivers and outboard passengers of pickup trucks and recreational vehicles were much less likely to be wearing their seatbelts. The same techniques used for observing vehicles were used for observing motorcycles. Areawide, 51 percent of the drivers of motorcycles were wearing helmets. It is important to note that survey results pertain to the driver and outboard passenger in a probability sample of vehicles drawn from the most settled areas of Alaska. Included in this area are the Municipality of Anchorage, the MatanuskaSusitna Borough, the Juneau Borough, the Kenai Peninsula Borough, and the Fairbanks North Star Borough.
    • An Assessment of Safety Belt Use In Alaska Summer 2001

      Hanna, Virgene (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      To be eligible for certain federal grants, states must document levels of compliance with seatbelt laws. During June, July and August of 2001, ISER researchers recorded and analyzed seat belt use by drivers and front seat passengers in both passenger cars and trucks. In the sample area (which includes 85 percent of the state's population), 63 percent of drivers and 60 percent of outboard passengers were wearing seatbelts. these numbers reflect an increase of just over 1 percent over what was observed in 2000.
    • Commercial Fishing Safety Record: A National Perspective

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1992)
      Commercial fishing safety is an important problem in Alaska. The kinds of problems which exist differ for different fisheries in Alaska - safety problems in the Bering Sea crab fishery are different than those in the southeast troll fishery. This makes it more difficult to define the nature of the Alaska commercial fishing safety problem or to figure out how to deal with it. The same things are true at the national level. Commercial fishing safety is an important problem throughout the United States. The safety problems in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fisheries are different from those in Alaska fisheries. These kinds of differences contribute to the difficulty of defining or addressing the commercial fishing safety problem at the national level. This presentation reviews elements of a report entitled Fishing Vessel Safety: Blueprint for a National Program to provide a picture of what emerged in its exploration of safety problems at the national level. All of the data and graphs are from the committee's report, except some additional data for Alaska. Any opinions expressed are the presenters, not the committee's or the authors of the original report. Presented at the National Fishing Industry Safety and Health Workshop in Anchorage, Alaska on October 9, 1992
    • Effects of IFQ Management on Alaska Halibut Fishery

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      In 1998, the University of Alaska Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) conducted two telephone surveys of Alaska halibut fishermen about the effects of Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) management of the Alaska halibut fishery. Funding for the surveys was provided by the Alaska Sea Grant College Program. There are 4 papers in this series covering study methodology, resource conservation, fishing safety, and unreported discards of halibut under IFQ management. Highlights: More than half of the respondents to both surveys answered "better" in response to the question "Compared with the old system, do you think that IFQ management is better, worse, or about the same for conservation of the halibut resource?" About one-quarter responded "about the same," while about 10% answered "worse." The great majority of halibut fishermen believe IFQs have made fishing for halibut safer. More than 85% of the respondents to both surveys answered "yes" to the question "Do you think IFQs have made fishing for halibut safer?" Responses were similar across vessel classes and 1997 harvest levels. Another question asked, "How much halibut do you think was caught and then discarded in 1997 without being sold or reported? Very little, some, or a lot?" Slightly more than half of halibut fishermen responded that "very little" halibut was caught and then discarded without being sold or reported, while about one-third answered "some" or "a lot." Respondents who gave positive responses about other effects of the IFQ program were much more likely to give a positive response about unreported discards.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2003

      Hanna, Virgene; Lampman, Claudia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This year's spotlight for the Kid's Count Alaska Data Book is child health. As many as 12,000 more children in Alaska could qualify for a government-funded program that provides health care coverage for children without health insurance, according to a non- profit group working to let more Alaskans know about the program. Denali KidCare is an extension of Medicaid for children from uninsured families whose income is somewhat too high to qualify them for Medicaid. In 2003, children whose family income was less than 175 percent of the federal poverty level could apply. About 22,000 children were enrolled in the program during 2002, and the estimate of 12,000 additional children who could be eligible is based on U.S. census information about family income. The 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that Alaska high-school students are only about half as likely to use inhalants or smoke cigarettes as they were in 1995, and significantly less likely to drink, to fight, and to have sex without using condoms. The decline in inhalant use is especially welcome news, since sniffing gasoline fumes has killed a number of teenagers in Alaska Native villages in recent years. Students in Alaska are also now less likely than students nationwide to use inhalants—and to smoke or get into fights. On almost all measures, fewer Alaska students reported risky behavior in 2003 than in 1995, the last time this survey was administered in school districts statewide. So the recent news is good, but many high-school students are still putting their health—especially their long-term health—and safety at risk.
    • On the Eve of IFQs: Fishing for Alaska's Halibut and Sablefish

      Berman, Matthew; Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1994)
      This year, anyone with a boat, longline gear, and a $50 permit could try for halibut in Alaska’s commercial fisheries. But that open access will likely end in 1995, when the federal government introduces Individual Fishing Quotas (IFQs). Quotas—shares of the catch—will be issued just to those who owned or leased vessels that fished for halibut between 1988 and 1990. An IFQ system for sablefish (black cod) under federal management will start at the same time. The IFQ plan is not popular with the men and women who fish for halibut: 68 percent of captains (permit holders) believe IFQs will unfairly allocate halibut, even though 78 percent agree they will make fishing safer. But the IFQ system could also cause big changes in wealth, income, and jobs in Alaska’s coastal communities, which rely heavily on fishing. ISER is studying the potential effects of IFQs, especially on small coastal towns, under a Saltonstall-Kennedy grant. As a first step we surveyed captains (most of whom were also owners) of vessels with longline gear. This publication reports our survey findings.