• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 2007)

      Rosay, André B.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Wood, Darryl S.; Kelley, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-03-01)
      The Spring 2007 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles describing stalking incidents reported to Alaska State Troopers from 1994 to 2005, a discussion of Alaska's 1993 stalking statute and a suggested update to it; and current visa programs which address the needs for guest workers in Alaska and the U.S.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Stalking Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 1994-2005

      Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2007-02-01)
      This project examined the characteristics of stalking incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers from 1994 to 2005. It included information from 210 reports, 222 charges, 211 suspects, 216 victims, and 246 witnesses. For those stalking incidents reported from 1999 to 2004, the charges, suspects, victims, witnesses, and legal resolutions are documented.
    • Overview of 'Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations. The briefing was coordinated through the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the Indian Law Resource Center, and the National Congress of American Indians.
    • Overview of UAA Justice Center Violence against Women Research

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-02-18)
      This Powerpoint presentation presents an overview of key results from Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska, including studies on sexual assault, stalking, and domestic violence through February 2009.
    • Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships to Impact Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Policy

      Masters, Joseph A.; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-04-07)
      The Alaska Department of Public Safety in partnership with the University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center has conducted and published numerous research projects and articles specific to domestic violence, sexual assault, child sexual abuse and stalking. These evidence based research projects have been used to develop Alaska’s new multidisciplinary and multifaceted initiative to combat domestic violence and sex crimes in Alaska. Certain portions of this new initiative target enforcement and prosecution of offenders who commit these crimes and are funded with both state general funds as well as Recovery Act Funds. The groundbreaking research conducted with UAA was supported with funds from the Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault and federal grant funds from the National Institute of Justice.
    • Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships to Impact Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Policy

      Rosay, André B.; TePas, Katherine H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-06-15)
      The Alaska Department of Public Safety and the UAA Justice Center conducted numerous research projects and published numerous articles on domestic violence, sexual assault, child sexual abuse, and stalking. These research projects were used to develop new multidisciplinary and multifaceted initiatives to combat violence against women in Alaska. This poster describes our researcher-practitioner partnership and its impact on policy and practice.
    • Sexual Assault in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-08-03)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation provides an overview of key results from Justice Center research on sexual assault in Alaska through August 2009, with discussion of victimization and its costs, victim characteristics, suspect characteristics, victim-suspect relationships, alcohol use, and criminal case processing (referral, prosecution, and disposition), and recidivism.
    • Sexual Violence in Alaska

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-06-01)
      This Powerpoint presentation presents an overview of key results from Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska through June 2009, with a particular focus on sexual assault, including victim characteristics, suspect characteristics, victim-suspect relationships, alcohol use, and criminal case processing (referral, prosecution, and disposition).
    • Stalking in Alaska

      Rosay, André B.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Wood, Darryl S. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 267 cases with a stalking charge reported to Alaska State Troopers from 1994 to 2005, and excluded any cases reported to local or municipal departments. We also examined the legal resolutions for cases that were reported from 1999-2004. * Over 50% of reports occurred in B detachment (Southcentral Alaska) and D detachment (Interior Alaska). Three units (Fairbanks AST Enforcement, Palmer AST Enforcement, and Soldotna AST Enforcement) handled 49% of reports. Thirty-five percent of the charges were for stalking in the first degree and 65% were for stalking in the second degree. * Most suspects (91%) were male and most victims (89%) were female. Most suspects (78%) were White and most victims (86%) were also White. On average, suspects were 36 years old while victims were 33 years old. Twenty percent of suspects had used alcohol, but only 2% of victims had used alcohol. Fifty-four percent of suspects were, or had been, in a romantic relationship with the victim. An additional 35% of suspects were friends or acquaintances of the victim. * The most common forms of stalking included standing outside or visiting the victim's home (in 54% of charges), making unsolicited phone calls to victims (in 51% of charges), following the victim (in 39% of charges), threatening to physically assault the victim (in 36% of charges), harassing the victim's family and friends (in 28% of charges), trying to communicate with the victim in other ways (in 27% of charges), standing outside or visiting the victim's work (in 20% of charges), physically assaulting the victim (in 19% of charges), sending the victim unsolicited mail (in 15% of charges), and vandalizing the victim's home (in 13% of charges). Forty-five percent of behaviors occurred primarily at the victim's home, while 27% occurred primarily in cyberspace. * Seventy-five percent of the cases reported between 1999-2004 were referred for prosecution, 55% were accepted for prosecution, and 40% resulted in a conviction on at least one charge. Cases with suspects who violated protective orders were 20% more likely to be referred for prosecution, were 19% more likely to be accepted, and were 41% more likely to result in a conviction.
    • Stalking Victimization in the Municipality of Anchorage: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Rosay, André B.; Rosay (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2017-01-27)
      This document is a two-page summary of key results on stalking victimization in the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey. The summary describes Alaska statutory definitions of the crime of stalking, methodology and limitations of the survey, and estimates of lifetime and past year stalking victimization experienced by adult women in the Municipality of Anchorage. The 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Municipality of Anchorage was conducted from May to August 2015. Stalking estimates were released on January 27, 2017. Findings include: * 1 in 4 women in the Municipality of Anchorage have experienced stalking in their lifetime; * 1 in 18 have experienced stalking in the past year; * More than 30,400 women in the Municipality of Anchorage have experienced stalking in their lifetime; and * More than 6,100 have experienced stalking in the past year. The 2015 survey also showed that stalking was particularly common among women who experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence: * Among women who experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence in their lifetime, 46% (more than 24,400) were also stalked in their lifetime; * Among women who experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence in the past year, 28% (more than 2,200) were also stalked in the past year.
    • Stalking Victimization in the State of Alaska: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2017-01-17)
      This document is a two-page summary of key results on stalking victimization in Alaska statewide from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey. The summary describes Alaska statutory definitions of the crime of stalking, methodology and limitations of the survey, and estimates of lifetime and past year stalking victimization experienced by adult women in Alaska. Results show that 1 in 3 women in Alaska have experienced stalking in their lifetime. One in 17 have experience stalking in the past year. More than 80,800 women in Alaska have experienced stalking in their lifetime, and more than 15,300 have experienced stalking in the past year. Stalking was even more common among women who had experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence.
    • Stalking Victimization: Comparisons Between Alaska and U.S. Data

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-01-01)
      This research overview presents information on stalking victimization currently available for Alaska and notes contrasts and similarities with the U.S. national data on stalking, looking in particular at gender, age, race, and relationship between victims and offenders. Limitations on the comparability of Alaska and national data are noted.
    • UAA Research on Violence against Women

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-03-25)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation presents an overview of key results from Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska, including studies on sexual assault, stalking, and domestic violence through March 2009.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-09)
      More than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women and men have experienced violence in their lifetime, and more than one in three experienced violence in the past year, according to a new report from an NIJ-funded study. The study, part of NIJ's research program on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women, looked at how prevalent psychological aggression and physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and sexual violence were among American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. It also examined the perpetrators' race and the impact of the violence.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05)
      This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05-18)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a webinar held at the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center (NIWRC), examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women. Few estimates are available to describe the prevalence of violence experienced by American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) women and men. In addition, these estimates are often based on local rather than national samples. The few available national estimates are often based on very small samples. These small samples do not always accurately represent the AI and AN population in the United States. This study provides the first set of estimates from a national large-scale survey of victimization among self-identified AI and AN men and women on psychological aggression, coercive control and entrapment, physical violence, stalking, and sexual violence, using detailed behaviorally specific questions. These results are expected to raise awareness and understanding of violence experienced by AI and AN people. The webinar also will highlight the need for additional services that are needed for AI and AN victims of crime—a need that has been persistently noted but lacked the research to support efforts to increase resources or allocate them appropriately.
    • Violence against Women in Alaska: Justice Perspective

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12-09)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation provides an overview of UAA Justice Center research on violence against women in Alaska through 2013, the current research being conducted through the Alaska Victimization Survey, and efforts to combat intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence in Alaska through the Choose Respect initiative.