• 1982 Conference on Violence

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-10-11)
      The 1982 Conference on Violence, sponsored by the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, was held October 11–13, 1982 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage. The conference was organized around five central themes: violent people, victims of violence, methods of preventing and controlling violence, firearms and violence, and research and public policy concerning violence.
    • Adult Violent and Property Crime Arrests in Alaska, 2002-2010

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
      This research overview presents data on adult arrests and arrest rates for serious violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 10, No. 4 (Winter 1994)

      Morrow, Phyllis; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Carns, Teresa W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-01-01)
      The Winter 1994 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum examines some of the salient issues surrounding language, interaction, and legal interpretation in Alaska situations. Associated stories describe policies on interpretation in federal and state courts in Alaska and examples of errors in translation between Yup'ik and English in actual courtroom situations. A National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) report finds that more than 2.5 million women in the United States experience violence annually; although are significantly less likely to become victims of violent crime than men, women are more vulnerable to particular types of perpetrators, including intimates such as husbands or boyfriends. An Alaska Judicial Council seminar on alternative sanctions highlights the various reasons that Alaska judges may choose alternative punishments, ranging from an effort to rehabilitate the offender to a decision to hold the offender accountable, recompense the victim, or respond to overcrowding in the local jail.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 11, No. 2 (Summer 1994)

      Trostle, Lawrence C.; Cunningham, Patrick; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-06-01)
      The Summer 1994 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum describes a pilot victim-offender mediation program in Anchorage which involves juveniles accused of certain offenses and the victims of those crimes. The number of prisoners under the jurisdiction of federal or state correctional authorities at the end of 1993 reached a record high of 948,881, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), with Alaska’s system increased by 7.1 per cent in 1993, less than the percentage increase for the nation as a whole. A second BJS report finds that nearly one million individuals each year become victims of violent crime while working or on duty, accounting for 15% of the over 6.5 million acts of violence experienced by Americans age 12 or older. A gift of $200,000 from Cook Inlet Region, Inc. (CIRI) to University of Alaska is intended to address justice issues and problems affecting Alaska Natives.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 16, No. 2 (Summer 1999)

      Riley, John; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1999-06-01)
      The Summer 1999 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum opens with an article presenting figures on the use of firearms in the commission of violent crimes in Alaska and in the U.S. as a whole from 1980 to 1997. A recent book on the growth of mass incarceration is reviewed. Major findings from an Alaska Judicial Council report on a 15-month pilot probation program for misdemeanor domestic violence offenders in Palmer are summarized.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 2005)

      Chamard, Sharon; Carns, Teresa W.; Langworthy, Robert H.; McKelvie, Alan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03-01)
      The Spring 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on youth violence in Anchorage, the Alaska Judicial Council's evaluation of three therapeutic courts, the relationship between drug use and arrest offenses in Anchorage, and Bureau of Justice Statistics figures on the high rates of criminal victimization experienced by Alaska Natives and Native Americans.
    • Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Firearms, 2009-2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) on characteristics of trauma admissions for the period 2009–2014 for injuries for which a firearm was the main mechanism of injury. The Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) is an active surveillance system that collects data pertaining to hospitalizations of the most seriously injured patients in Alaska.
    • Collective Efficacy and Firearms Violence in Anchorage, Alaska: Preliminary Findings

      Evans, Shel Llee; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-02)
      This paper seeks to advance the discussion of the utility of collective efficacy, as captured by Sampson, Raudenbush and Earls, in understanding community levels of crime by exploring the relation between community structure, collective efficacy, and in this case firearms violence, in Anchorage, Alaska. The specific aims of this paper are to report the results of a test of the collective efficacy thesis, modeled loosely after the test presented in the 1997 Science paper by Sampson, Raudenbush and Earls, as an explanation of neighborhood rates of firearms violence in Anchorage.
    • Insights and Strategies for Confronting Violence: Conference Proceedings

      Johnson, Knowlton W.; Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-06)
      This volume collects 25 papers based on presentations at the 1982 Conference on Violence sponsored by the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, which was held October 11–13, 1982 in Anchorage. Part I, “Violent Behavior and Contributing Factors,” presents papers focusing on sexual abuse, police violence, and political violence. Additionally, firearms, alcohol, and the media are discussed as contributing factors to violence. Part II, “Control, Treatment and Prevention of Violence,” highlights traditional and alternative strategies for combating violence. In particular, research findings and models are presented that center on domestic violence, sexual abuse, violent juvenile and adult crime, crime against children, and the criminally insane. Part III, “Victims of Violence,” gives attention to traditional victim services as well as proposals for alternative programs for victims of violence. In addition, there is a discussion of people experiencing homelessness as victims of violence. Part IV, “Public Policy and Violence,” focuses on macrolevel issues of violence. The lead article presents a policy perspective in connection with violence in Northern Canada. Other issues addressed in the remaining articles are public policy and victims of violence, resource management and violence control, legal ramifications of censoring violence in the media, and use of research in combating violence.
    • The Justice Center

      Fitzgerald, Doreen (University of Alaska Magazine, 1982-11)
      This article, by the editor of University of Alaska Magazine, presents a profile of the Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage. The article covers the Justice Center's creation (as the Criminal Justice Center) in 1975, its faculty and staff, and Justice Center research and education projects, such as the Justice Center-sponsored 1982 Conference on Violence (https://scholarworks.alaska.edu/handle/11122/10716) and video documentaries including an award-winning series on the legal and social issues of the Beaufort Sea oil lease sale. Other items of discussion include faculty views on crime and crime prevention and a project to develop a conflict resolution center in Anchorage.
    • Juvenile Violent and Property Crime Arrests in Alaska, 2002–2010

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
      This research overview presents data on juvenile arrests and arrest rates for serious violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
    • Merging Social Control and Criminal Law in Small Eskimo Villages in Alaska — Can It Be Done? The Portrait of the Inner Logic of Social Control Governing Drinking Behavior and Its Relationship to Criminal Law Process

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1985-04-04)
      The legal reaction by Yup'ik and Inupiat Eskimos in Alaska to drunken behavior has changed over time from one that penalizes drunkenness to one that seeks to prevent drinking. This new therapeutic approach interferes with any preemptive aggressive response by persons seeking to control an intoxicated person. Moreover, since the law perceives an intoxicated person as sick rather than bad, the traditional perception that an intoxicated person is not his normal self may be reinforced by the law. Indeed, a drunken person may act aggressively without fear of later community blame. The author concludes that the law should re-orient Native community members to understand that there is a connection between the sober and intoxicated self.
    • Model Programs for the Prevention of Youth Violence

      Rosay, André B.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-01-28)
      This poster compares levels of youth violence in Anchorage to U.S. levels and identifies effective programs to reduce levels of youth violence, including functional family therapy, multisystemic therapy, nurse-family partnership, multidimensional treatment foster care, bullying prevention program, promoting alternative thinking strategies, and "the incredible years." Estimated program costs are also detailed.
    • Overview of 'Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-06-16)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a Congressional briefing, examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men based on a nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Findings included estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners, as well as estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations. The briefing was coordinated through the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the Indian Law Resource Center, and the National Congress of American Indians.
    • The Use of Research in Confronting Violence in Alaska: Final Report

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-10)
      This study of research diffusion and use in Alaska was a major effort to generate empirical information about the connection between research and policymaking relating to the critical problem of violence, a problem which threatens the quality of life for Alaskans . Policy questions of interest centered on: (1) describing the research diffusion process in connection with human service agencies that deal with problems of violent behavior; (2) determining how research influences decisions about violence reduction policy and programming; and (3) discovering what facilitates or inhibits the use of research in making decisions about combating violence.
    • Utilization of Research in Combating Violence in Alaska: An Ecological Perspective

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-09)
      Research diffusion and use has increasingly become an interest of social scientists and policymakers. This interest on the part of policymakers is evidenced by the results of this study. In particular, high level administrators in 268 human service agencies of Alaska reported moderate to high use of statistics, evaluation studies and other social science research in making pol icy decisions about combating violence. Findings are also presented that point to specific facilitators and inhibitors of research use. The conclusions and policy implications highlight how the results of this research utilization study can direct the formulation of a research and development agenda at the agency and state level.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-09)
      More than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women and men have experienced violence in their lifetime, and more than one in three experienced violence in the past year, according to a new report from an NIJ-funded study. The study, part of NIJ's research program on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women, looked at how prevalent psychological aggression and physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and sexual violence were among American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. It also examined the perpetrators' race and the impact of the violence.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05)
      This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05-18)
      This Powerpoint, presented as part of a webinar held at the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center (NIWRC), examines findings from a study of the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women. Few estimates are available to describe the prevalence of violence experienced by American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) women and men. In addition, these estimates are often based on local rather than national samples. The few available national estimates are often based on very small samples. These small samples do not always accurately represent the AI and AN population in the United States. This study provides the first set of estimates from a national large-scale survey of victimization among self-identified AI and AN men and women on psychological aggression, coercive control and entrapment, physical violence, stalking, and sexual violence, using detailed behaviorally specific questions. These results are expected to raise awareness and understanding of violence experienced by AI and AN people. The webinar also will highlight the need for additional services that are needed for AI and AN victims of crime—a need that has been persistently noted but lacked the research to support efforts to increase resources or allocate them appropriately.
    • Violent and Property Offenses in Alaska, 2002–2010

      Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
      This research overview presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for seven of the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. (UCR does not report the other Part I offense, arson, by state. For arson arrests, see Research Overview numbers 15 and 16). Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.