• Diaries of Archaeological Expeditions to Alaska with the Smithsonian's Aleš Hrdlička in 1936, 1937, and 1938

      Veltre, Douglas W.; May, Alan G. (2021-01)
      For three summers in the late 1930s, Dr. Aleš Hrdlička, the preeminent physical anthropologist in the United States in the first half of the 20th century, led expeditions to southwestern Alaska to investigate the earliest peopling of that region. Curator of Physical Anthropology at the U.S. National Museum at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., the acknowledged “founding father” of physical anthropology in the United States sailed north with small crews of young men—whom he called his “boys”—in the summers of 1936, 1937, and 1938 to probe ancient villages, camps, and burial places on Kodiak Island and throughout the Aleutian Islands. Only one member of his crews took part in all three of these expeditions—Alan G. May. While nearly everyone who knew Hrdlička recognized him to be a kind and often generous scientist of world renown, albeit an elite and difficult taskmaster, May developed an affection for him and an interest in Alaskan archaeology that brought him back on each summer’s venture. For his part, Hrdlička considered May to be his “best man.” Most important, unlike Hrdlička’s other crew members, May kept detailed and lengthy diaries of each summer’s thoughts and experiences. Those documents, presented here, offer insights into both May’s own character as well as his personal perspective on—as Aleš Hrdlička has recently been called—“a most peculiar man.” May’s diaries have been transcribed, edited, and made available through Archives and Special Collections, University of Alaska Anchorage/Alaska Pacific University Consortium Library (henceforth, the Archives), with the support of the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, the not-for-profit Alaska Native Corporation for the region. In this introduction, I offer some brief historical context to those diaries. I begin with background on Hrdlička, including his place in the discipline of American anthropology and his interest in Alaska studies. Next, I outline the significance of the Kodiak Island and Aleutian Islands region to Hrdlička. This is followed, based in part on my personal association with him, by notes about Alan May and his participation in Hrdlička’s research in Alaska. Following this, I outline the three expeditions and their participants. Finally, I offer observations on May’s diaries and the manner in which they are presented here. --Douglas W. Veltre, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of Alaska Anchorage
    • Monty's Bridge to Tomorrow (モンティの明日への架け橋)

      Harada, Hiroko; Ushida, Eiko; Kataoka, Hiroko; Izumi, Yuruka; Douglas, Masako; Chinen, Kiyomi; Tokuda, Junko; Masuyama, Kazue; Murakami, Chisato; 原田宏子; et al. (2014-07-04)
      本書の「モンティの明日への架け橋」は、2011 年3 月11 日の東日本大震災の津波で亡 くなったアラスカ大学アンカレジ校(University of Alaska Anchorage [UAA]) の卒業生、 モントゴメリー・ディクソン(モンティ)を記念して作成されました。モンティは、 UAA で日本語を専攻して2009 年に卒業し、その夏JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching) プログラムで 岩手県陸前高田市に派遣され、外国語指導助手(ALT)として、地元の小 中学校の英語教育に従事しました。日本文化をこよなく愛し、地元の住民の方々と家族 のように交わり、「モンティ先生」として親しまれていました。津波に流される数時間 前には司馬遼太郎の「世のために尽くした人の一生ほど、美しいものはない」の英訳を 書き残しています。26 歳でした。 この震災では、もう一人のJETALT、バージニアのランドルフ・メイコン大学出身のテ イラー・アンダーソンさんが石巻で津波の犠牲となりました。国際交流基金日米センタ ー(Center for Global Partnership [CGP]) では両氏の出身校において記念事業を実施し、 その一環として、UAA には2012 年に「モントゴメリー・ディクソン日本語日本文化教 育センター」(Montgomery Dickson Center for Japanese Language & Culture) が設立されま した。当センター企画の「モンティの明日への架け橋」の教科書の企画は2013 年と 2014 年の二年間に渡るCGP の助成金により実現しました。 本書は、カリフォルニア大学サン・ディエゴ校の牛田英子、ならびにカリフォルニア州 立大学ロングビーチ校の片岡裕子の監修の元、9 人の日本語教師によって執筆され、大 学レベルの日本語中上級を対象に作成されています。陸前高田市で無料の英語教室を開 講していたモンティの精神にのっとり、オンラインで無料配布いたします。多くの教 師・学生の皆さんに利用していただき、「太平洋の架け橋」となるというモンティの夢 を皆で実現していくことを心から願っています。
    • No Need of Gold — Alcohol Control Laws and the Alaska Native Population: From the Russians through the Early Years of Statehood

      Conn, Stephen; Moras, Antonia (School of Justice, University of Alaska, Anchorage, 1986)
      Based on two earlier works by the author — "Alcohol Control in Village Alaska and Town Law" and "Town Law, Village Law" — this history traces the use of legal resources to control alcohol consumption among the Alaska Native population from the period of Russian domination through Alaska statehood in 1959 and makes a detailed examination of alcohol-related issues in Bethel in the decade immediately following statehood.
    • Northern Eskimo stories

      Lynch, Kathleen Roys (Anchorage Community College. Adult Literacy Laboratory, 1978-11)
      The Adult Literacy Laboratory was an Anchorage Community College (ACC) program that trained paraprofessional teachers in the villages how to use materials and curriculum the ALL Project created and disseminated all over Alaska.
    • Southeastern stories

      Lynch, Kathleen Roys (Anchorage Community College. Adult Literacy Laboratory, 1978)
      The Adult Literacy Laboratory was an Anchorage Community College (ACC) program that trained paraprofessional teachers in the villages how to use materials and curriculum the ALL Project created and disseminated all over Alaska.
    • Stories of the the Aleutians and Kodiak

      Lynch, Kathleen Roys (Anchorage Community College. Adult Literacy Laboratory, 1978)
      The Adult Literacy Laboratory was an Anchorage Community College (ACC) program that trained paraprofessional teachers in the villages how to use materials and curriculum the ALL Project created and disseminated all over Alaska.
    • A Village Fish Processing Plant: Yes or No?

      Knapp, Gunnar (2001)
      People in many Alaska villages are interested in starting fish processing plants. A fish processing plant can provide markets for fishermen, processing jobs and income for village residents, and many other benefits. But starting and operating a village fish processing plant is not easy, and fish processing plants may not work in every village. This handbook is to help you get started in planning a fish processing plant in your village. It can help you think clearly about whether or not you should start a fish processing plant. It provides step-by-step advice about questions you need to ask and decisions you need to make. As part of this handbook, we have included case studies of experiences some western Alaska villages have had with fish processing plants. These may give you ideas of things to do–and things to avoid–when you are thinking about a fish processing plant for your village.