• Alaska Economic Database: Charting Four Decades of Change

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      This document contains data collated over four decades between 1961 and 1998. Data included in this document relate to employment, Alaska and state gross product, earnings, wages, salaries, labor market, price indices, and other economic indicators considered to be important at the time of collection.
    • Alaska Partnership for Teacher Enhancement Survey Summary

      Institute for Social and Economic Research, UAA (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      Provides high level results for open-ended questions from the Alaska Partnership for Teacher Enhancement District Questionnaire Fall 2004. No interpretation is provided.
    • The Alaska Village Energy Model

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska, 2013)
      We have constructed a simple but comprehensive village energy use model that includes space heating and transportation fuel use as well as electricity. Because people in isolated remote northern communities pay about 2/3 of their overall energy bills for heat and transportation (WH Pacific et al. 2012), knowledge of overall energy demand by major end use is important when considering energy systems that can make the best use of efficiency and renewables as resources to offset costly fossil fuels. Previous work (Devine & Baring-Gould 2004) provides community planners and policy makers with a good tool for estimating community electricity demand. This paper builds on that work with an integrated model that can be used to estimate overall village energy usage based on a relatively small number of socioeconomic characteristics, such as population; number of residential, commercial and public facilities; housing and building stock characteristics; and transportation patterns and equipment types. The Alaska Village Energy Model (AVEM) model uses the best available primary data from recent collection efforts, and can easily incorporate new data that may become available."
    • Kids Count Alaska 2000

      Dinges, Norman; Lampman, Claudia; Ragan, Shawna (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      Children living in small isolated places lead much different lives from those in bigger communities on the road system. Many villages still lack adequate water and sewer systems, and some still rely on honey buckets. In the past 20 years, state and federal agencies have built sanitation systems in many rural places–but it’s an enormous and ongoing job. Part of the problem is that many areas of Alaska require specially adapted systems that are very expensive to build and operate. In this data book, we look at (1) the indicators of children’s well-being the Kids Count program uses nationwide; and (2) other measures that reflect conditions Alaskan children face—and that illustrate the sharp differences among regions of a state twice the size of the original 13 American colonies.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2001

      Hanna, Virgene; Lampman, Claudia (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      Children living in small isolated places lead much different lives from those in bigger communities on the road system. Many villages still lack adequate water and sewer systems, and some still rely on honey buckets. In the past 20 years, state and federal agencies have built sanitation systems in many rural places–but it’s an enormous and ongoing job. Part of the problem is that many areas of Alaska require specially adapted systems that are very expensive to build and operate. In this data book, we look at (1) the indicators of children’s well-being the Kids Count program uses nationwide; and (2) other measures that reflect conditions Alaskan children face—and that illustrate the sharp differences among regions of a state twice the size of the original 13 American colonies.
    • Measuring Adult Criminal Victimization: Findings from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey

      Giblin, Matthew; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-07)
      Since 1973, the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) has been administered annually to a national sample of households. The survey captures unreported or underreported criminal events that are not available using official crime data such as the Uniform Crime Reports. However, the data collected are most useful in identifying crime trends nationwide. The national scope of the survey makes it impossible to extract crime data for smaller geographic areas, thus limiting its utility for Anchorage residents and policymakers with criminal justice concerns. To compensate for this limitation, the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage administered a local version of the NCVS during second quarter 2002. By surveying adult residents of Anchorage, the project, titled the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey (AACVS), generated a wealth of information on crime victimization, neighborhood conditions, fear, and policing in Anchorage. This report presents the results of the AACVS.
    • National Guard Subsistence Survey Reports (2006 and 2007)

      DeRoche, Patricia; Goldsmith, Scott; Killorin, Mary; Schultz, Caroline; Ulran, Uyuriukaraq Lily Anne Andrews; Wilson, Meghan (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      These reports provides data collected regarding subsistence activities in communities of Alaska's north and south west regions (2006) and in the southeast region including Kenai and Kodiak (2007) . Data is tabulated by community and then by species. No interpretation is provided. Information intended to determine the best times for the National Guard to conduct training exercises in these areas.
    • Public School Finance Programs for the United States and Canada: 1998-99

      Berman, Matthew (National Center for Education Statistics, 2001)
      This publication was undertaken by NCES in partnership with two private entities, the The Association for Education Finance and Policy, which contracted for the information collection, and the National Education Association (NEA), which funded the effort. This publication of expert authors' descriptions of each state or province funding system was compiled by education finance researchers from the University of Georgia and the University of Ottawa....The compilers sought to balance the simplicity of the descriptions to make them understandable to a wide audience and, at the same time, technically correct. Some of the terms and concepts might be new to the reader who is unfamiliar with the arcane art of education state aid formulas. To true finance sophisticates, however, these descriptions may lack the abstruse detail to deploy similar formulas in other venues.... The papers in this publication were requested by the National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education. They are intended to promote the exchange of ideas among researchers and policymakers, no official support by the U.S. Department of Education or NCES is intended or should be inferred.
    • Susitna-Watana Cost of Power Analysis

      Colt, Steve (2013)
      This paper provides a simple analysis of the cost of the proposed Susitna-Watana hydroelectric project from a ratepayer perspective, using data current as of June 2013. The Susitna Case 1 assumptions include a capital cost of 5.19 billion 2012 dollars, 100% debt financing at 5.0%, and an on-line date of 2024. Under these assumptions plus others described below, the production cost of Susitna power in 2024 would be 13 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) and the cost at a Railbelt customer’s meter would be about 18 cents per kWh.1 By comparison, if natural gas is available to electric utilities in year 2024 at a price of about $9.50 per million btu, and ignoring potential carbon taxes, then the production cost and retail cost of power from a new combined cycle gas turbine going online in 2024 would be about 11 cents and 16 cents per kWh, respectively.
    • Voluntary and Involuntary Child Support Payments in Alaska, February 1, 1987 to January 1, 1991 — Charts

      University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 1991)
      This document presents four figures with tables containing underlying data prepared from data from the Alaska Child Support Enforcement Division, comparing voluntary and involuntary child support payments in Alaska, February 1, 1987 to January 1, 1991.