• 1982 Conference on Violence

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-10-11)
      The 1982 Conference on Violence, sponsored by the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, was held October 11–13, 1982 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage. The conference was organized around five central themes: violent people, victims of violence, methods of preventing and controlling violence, firearms and violence, and research and public policy concerning violence.
    • About the Authors

      ANSC (2015-08-20)
    • Barrow

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979)
      This unpublished manuscript discusses police, judicial practices, and alcohol control in Barrow and the North Slope Borough of Alaska in the 1970s, and compares outpatient accident trends in Barrow and Bethel and their implications for protective custody laws. Community solutions to alcohol control in an area village, discussed under the pseudonym “Fishnet," are also described.
    • A Basic Police Communications and Records System: Student Manual for the Police Communications and Records Program

      Angell, John E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980)
      This student manual describes the basic structure of a sound police communications and records system, covering organization; files, forms, and procedures; property control records; and records retention and destruction.
    • Book Review of Village Journey by Thomas R. Berger

      Conn, Stephen (1985-09)
      This article reviews Village Journey: The Report of the Alaska Native Review Commission by Thomas R. Berger (New York: Hill and Wang, 1985). The Alaska Native Review Commission, headed by former Canadian parliamentarian and justice Thomas Berger, initiated an inquiry into the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) in 1984, visiting 62 villages and hearing 1600 residents to determine ANCSA's impact on Alaska Native lands and communities. Berger found that ANCSA had placed Native land at risk, endangering not only its title but the rights of Alaska Natives to subsist upon it.
    • Contract Award No. UAA 1514

      University of Alaska Anchorage (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-12-15)
    • The Correctional Master Plan: Some Legislative Options

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-11-30)
      This testimony before the House Judiciary Committee of the Alaska State Legislature lays out potential future scenarios for corrections in Alaska. The author urges legislators to pay attention to the results of over half a million dollars worth of research on correctional problems in Alaska over the past three years in its decisionmaking on how to implement recommendations of the Alaska Corrections Master Plan.
    • Courts and Trials: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to seventh-graders, ""Courts and Trials," focuses on the judicial system in America and in Alaska. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as local news articles about Alaska courts and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • The DOD Economic Analysis of Eielson Realignment Is Seriously Flawed

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      The DOD analysis of the economic impact on Fairbanks of the realignment of Eielson air base concludes that the net loss of 2,940 military and civilian jobs at Eielson would result in the loss of 1,770 additional jobs in the Fairbanks MSA (Fairbanks North Star Borough). This would represent a loss of 8.6% of all jobs, based on an estimate of 54,469 total jobs in the Borough. The loss of 8.6% of all jobs represents the 4th largest hit as a percentage among all 234 regions that would by effected by implementation of the BRAC recommendations. Netting out those bases recommended for closure, and thus available for redevelopment, the negative economic impact on Fairbanks would be exceeded in only one other region (Clovis, New Mexico).
    • Elder Abuse: More Than 1 in 9 Alaskan Women 60+ Experienced Abuse in the Past Year (transcript)

      Rosay, André B.; Casto, L. Diane (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage; Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety, 2017-06-14)
      [This is a transcript of a video presentation, which can be found at https://youtu.be/DT5KdyOmNJE.] Dr. Andre Rosay, director of the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, presents findings from the Alaska Victimization Survey with L. Diane Casto, executive director of the Alaska Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDVSA), which funds the Alaska Victimization Survey. Results show that 11.5% or 1 in 9 Alaskan women aged 60 and older experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year.
    • Finland v. the USA: Imprisonment Responses to Crime

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-10-20)
      This manuscript, prepared as a chapter for a prospective book on corrections and punishment in the Scandinavian/Nordic nations of northern Europe, compares Finland with the United States with respect to the imprisonment response to crime, correctional policies, and correctional populations.
    • Index to Volumes 1–10

      UAA Justice Center; Green, Melissa S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-04-11)
      The Alaska Justice Forum began publication in May 1977 under funding from the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice. It was published by the Criminal Justice Center (now the Justice Center) of the University of Alaska Anchorage and was edited by Roger V. Endell, Peter S. Ring, and Paul L. Edscorn. Due to lack of funding it discontinued with the June 1979 issue (Volume 3, Number 6). The Justice Center and the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit resumed publication of the Alaska Justice Forum under a different format in Spring 1987 (Volume 4, Number 1) with partial funding from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice. The Alaska Justice Forum is edited by Antonia Moras. This index includes all articles published in the Alaska Justice Forum from Volume 1, Number 1 (May 1977) through Volume 10, Number 4 (Winter 1994). It was compiled by Melissa S. Green.
    • Interview with Victor C. Krumm

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-10-28)
      Victor C. Krumm, district attorney in Bethel, Alaska from 1976 to 1979, was interviewed on October 28, 1978 about the numerous difficulties in enforcing state liquor laws and local liquor ordinances in Bethel and the villages of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in southwestern Alaska. According to Krumm, the authority villages formerly held to solve their own conflicts was removed due to constitutional rights guarantees, but gaps in the law and insufficient judicial and law enforcement resources in the bush leave villages without the ability to preserve social order.
    • Interview with William R. Nix

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1973)
      William R. Nix, magistrate supervisor with the Alaska Court System and former an Alaska State Trooper, was interviewed in 1973 about law enforcement in bush Alaska during the early years of Alaska statehood; the relationships between Alaska State Troopers, village councils, magisrates of the Alaska Court System, and district attorneys in regional hubs; bail decisions for accused offenders; and the difficulties of establishing and maintaining a fair and equitable justice system in the predominately Alaska Native villages of rural Alaska.
    • Introducing New Criteria for Assessing Training Materials About the Elderly

      Johnson, Knowlton W.; Beirnard, Charles A.; Stiles, Stephen R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-11)
      In what ways do law enforcement personnel and agencies use knowledge about the elderly? This article presents the findings of a recent study conducted by the International Training Research and Evaluation Council on how law enforcement trainees make use of the knowledge they gained through training materials developed by the National Retired Teachers Association/American Association of Retired Persons.
    • Juvenile Problems and the Law: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to eighth-graders, "Juvenile Problems and the Law," focuses on the legal aspects of juvenile delinquency and contains information regarding "helping" agencies. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as Alaska laws and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Lawmaking: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to fifth-graders, "Lawmaking," focuses on how our laws are made. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as information about the Alaska Legislature and other legal bodies in Alaska, the steps in the passage of a law in Alaska, and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Officer Drug- and Alcohol-Related Workload Daily Activity Log: User's Guide

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2002-08)
      This guide provides instructions to officers of the Anchorage Police Department for recording daily log forms as part of a study of the extent to which Anchorage patrol officer activities are the result of, or are in some way associated with, drugs and/or alcohol. Data collection was conducted over a seven-day period in August 2002.
    • Satellite Villages: Bethel and State Liquor Policy in the Modern Era

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979)
      When representatives of eleven villages in the 57-village Bethel region met in Bethel on September 19, 1962, to organize what came to be the Association of Village Council Presidents, they also discussed the interplay between state law and traditional social control meted out by village councils as they dealt with liquor-related problems. This paper examines the breakdown of the working relationship between official Alaska law and village social control in the 1960s and its impact on village law and the role of town liquor policy and town police and treatment resources on alcohol-related violence in the villages in the 1970s.